Long range oil spill forecast

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:02 PM GMT on June 04, 2010

Share this Blog
4
+

Onshore winds out of the south, southwest, or west are expected to blow over the northern Gulf of Mexico over through Tuesday, resulting in a continued threat of landfalling oil to Alabama, Mississippi, and the Florida Panhandle, according to the latest trajectory forecasts from NOAA and the State of Louisiana. The latest ocean current forecasts from the NOAA HYCOM model show that these winds will generate a 0.5 mph current flowing from west to east along the Florida Panhandle coast Sunday through Tuesday. If this current develops as predicted, it will be capable of bringing light amounts of oil as far east as Panama City, Florida, by Wednesday. Long range surface wind forecasts from the GFS model for the period 8 - 14 days from now predict a return to a southeasterly wind regime, which would bring the oil back over Louisiana by mid-June. If you spot oil, send in your report to http://www.gulfcoastspill.com/, whose mission is to help the Gulf Coast recovery by creating a daily record of the oil spill.

Long range oil spill outlook
The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) issued a press release yesterday showing 4-month model runs (Figure 1) of where the Deepwater Horizon oil spill might go. The model runs show that given typical ocean currents in the Gulf of Mexico, we can expect the oil to eventually affect most of the Florida Panhandle, Keys, and Florida East Coast, as well as coastal areas of South Carolina and North Carolina. Very little oil makes it to the West Florida "Forbidden Zone", where offshore-moving surface currents dominate. The oil may eventually affect three foreign countries: Mexico along the northern tip of the Yucatan Peninsula, Cuba near Havana, and the Bahamas in the Bimini Islands and along the western side of Grand Bahama Island. Once oil does get into the Loop Current, it will probably reach the coasts of France, Spain, and Portugal in about a year. The oil will be too dilute by then to be noticeable, though.

The present ocean current configuration in the Gulf features a newly formed Loop Current Eddy (dubbed "Franklin"), which will tend to capture the majority of oil that flows southwards from the Deepwater Horizon spill site. A plot of drifting buoys (drifters) launched into the Gulf May 19 - 24 (Figure 2) reveals how this clockwise-rotating eddy has been capturing southward-moving surface water. Eddy Franklin will move slowly west-southwest at 2 - 3 mph in the coming weeks. By August or September, the eddy will have moved far enough west that the Loop Current will be able to push northwards towards the spill location again, increasing the chances of oil getting into the Loop Current and being advected through the Florida Straits and up the U.S. Southeast Coast. Between now and mid-August, I doubt that a significant amount of oil will get into the Loop Current, unless a hurricane or tropical storm goes through the Gulf of Mexico. I put the odds of this happening by mid-August at 50%. The odds of a named storm in the Gulf of Mexico will increase sharply after mid-August, when the peak portion of hurricane season arrives. Past history shows a 95% chance of getting two or more named storms in the Gulf of Mexico during hurricane seasons with above-normal activity.


Figure 1. Animation from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) showing one scenario of how oil released at the location of the Deepwater Horizon disaster on April 20 in the Gulf of Mexico may move in the upper 65 feet of the ocean.


Figure 2. During the R/V Bellows 19-24 May 2010 Cruise into the Loop Current, drifters were dropped on the eastern edge of the Loop Current. These drifters have all been caught in Loop Current Eddy "Franklin", and are orbiting the central Gulf of Mexico in clockwise loops. Additional drifters deployed by the Coast Guard over the past few weeks (orange colors) are also shown. The colored balloons show the starting location of the drifters. Image credit: University of South Florida.

Oil spill resources
My post, What a hurricane would do the Deepwater Horizon oil spill
My post on the Southwest Florida "Forbidden Zone" where surface oil will rarely go
My post on what oil might do to a hurricane
Oil trajectory forecasts from NOAA
Gulf Oil Blog from the UGA Department of Marine Sciences
Oil Spill Academic Task Force
University of South Florida Ocean Circulation Group oil spill forecasts
ROFFS Deepwater Horizon page
Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery from the University of Miami


Figure 2. Visible satellite image of Tropical Cyclone Phet on Friday, June 4, 2010.

Tropical Cyclone Phet unleashes heavy rains on Oman
Tropical Cyclone Phet hit the northern tip of Oman yesterday as a Category 2 storm, bringing torrential rains and killing at least two people. Masirah, Oman recorded sustained winds of 74 mph yesterday, and Sur, Oman on the northeast coast has received 3.25 inches of rain so far. Phet was the 2nd strongest tropical cyclone ever recorded in the Arabian Sea, when it peaked at Category 4 strength with 145 mph. Only Category 5 Cyclone Gonu of 2007, which devastated Oman, was stronger. Phet has emerged from the coast of Oman this morning, but is likely to weaken over the next day due to increased wind shear. Phet should hit Pakistan as a tropical storm on Saturday, bringing heavy rain and serious flooding.

Next update
I'll probably have one update over the weekend. The tropical Atlantic is quiet right now, with no models predicting tropical cyclone development over the next seven days.

Jeff Masters

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 2206 - 2156

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64 | 65 | 66 | 67 | 68 | 69 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 74 | 75 | 76 | 77 | 78 | 79 | 80 | 81 | 82 | 83 | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 89 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93 | 94 | 95 | 96 | 97 | 98 | 99 | 100 | 101 | 102 | 103 | 104 | 105Blog Index

Quoting hurricane23:


Terrifying night. I was 15. I could imagine what is was like living here in 40's. 1 major every other year. Crazy


I was 11. I remember the eye coming over and hearing everyone screaming out for their neighbors. Not too many houses were left standing around us. Why anyone would actually wish for something like that is beyond me.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2205. IKE
288 hour 18Z GFS is a BP nightmare...

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Thundercloud01221991:
Ida made landfall that image does not show the entire track for some reason


From Wikipedia, "Shortly before making landfall near Dauphin Island, Alabama, the storm completed its extratropical transition."
Member Since: May 27, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 4438
TROPICAL DEPRESSION IDA ADVISORY NUMBER 27
NWS TPC/NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL AL112009
900 AM CST TUE NOV 10 2009

...IDA BECOMES EXTRATROPICAL...ALL WARNINGS DISCONTINUED...

AT 900 AM CST...1500 UTC...ALL TROPICAL STORM WARNINGS HAVE BEEN
DISCONTINUED.

FOR STORM INFORMATION SPECIFIC TO YOUR AREA...INCLUDING POSSIBLE
INLAND WATCHES AND WARNINGS...PLEASE MONITOR PRODUCTS ISSUED BY
YOUR LOCAL NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FORECAST OFFICE.

DATA FROM NOAA DOPPLER RADAR AND SURFACE OBSERVATIONS INDICATE THAT
THE CENTER OF IDA MADE ITS SECOND LANDFALL AROUND 700 AM CST...1300
UTC...JUST TO THE NORTHWEST OF BON SECOUR ALABAMA.


AT 900 AM CST...1500 UTC...THE CENTER OF IDA WAS LOCATED NEAR
LATITUDE 30.6 NORTH...LONGITUDE 87.6 WEST OR ABOUT 30 MILES... 50
KM...EAST-SOUTHEAST OF MOBILE ALABAMA AND ABOUT 25 MILES... 40
KM...WEST-NORTHWEST OF PENSACOLA FLORIDA.

IDA IS MOVING TOWARD THE NORTHEAST NEAR 9 MPH...15 KM/HR...AND THIS
GENERAL MOTION WITH A TURN TOWARD THE EAST IS EXPECTED UNTIL IT
BECOMES ABSORBED BY A FRONT ON WEDNESDAY.

MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS HAVE DECREASED TO NEAR 35 MPH...55
KM/HR...WITH HIGHER GUSTS. IDA HAS LOST TROPICAL CHARACTERISTICS
AND ITS WINDS ARE EXPECTED TO SLOWLY DIMINISH DURING THE NEXT DAY
OR SO.

THE ESTIMATED MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE IS 1000 MB...29.53 INCHES.

IDA IS EXPECTED TO PRODUCE TOTAL RAIN ACCUMULATIONS OF 3 TO 6
INCHES...WITH ISOLATED MAXIMUM STORM TOTALS OF 8 INCHES...THROUGH
WEDNESDAY EVENING FROM THE EASTERN GULF COAST ACROSS THE
SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES INTO THE SOUTHERN MID-ATLANTIC
STATES.

WATER LEVELS ALONG THE NORTHERN GULF COAST SHOULD GRADUALLY BEGIN TO
SUBSIDE DURING THE DAY.

...SUMMARY OF 900 AM CST INFORMATION...
LOCATION...30.6N 87.6W
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...35 MPH
PRESENT MOVEMENT...NORTHEAST OR 45 DEGREES AT 9 MPH
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...1000 MB

THIS IS THE LAST PUBLIC ADVISORY ISSUED BY THE NATIONAL HURRICANE
CENTER ON THIS SYSTEM. FUTURE INFORMATION ON IDA CAN BE FOUND IN
PUBLIC ADVISORIES ISSUED BY THE HYDROMETEOROLOGICAL PREDICTION
CENTER...UNDER AWIPS HEADER TCPAT1 AND WMO HEADER WTNT31
KWNH...BEGINNING AT 300 PM CST.


$$
FORECASTER BLAKE/CANGIALOSI

NNNN
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting MrstormX:


Wow thats a very good point!

Even I, in my advanced years, can remember a few details about last November.

(though we did just do a wind analysis and WRF model hindcast run for Ida literally 3 days ago)
Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 6 Comments: 12463
Quoting CaneWarning:


I was in Homestead not far from US1. It's amazing to go back to that area and see how much it's all grown. I can't imagine anything like it going through there now. Luckily building codes are much better.


Terrifying night i was 15. I could imagine what is was like living here in 40's. 1 major every other year. Crazy
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
My first storm of the day, its kind of disappointing considering it was supposed to be moderate risk today. But on a positive side it doesn't look like much damage is going to occur in Illinois.

Member Since: May 27, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 4438
Ida made landfall that image does not show the entire track for some reason
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
MrsStormX, its running along the western edge of Broward County. Cell that has the Severe T-Storm warning on it. Had some big size hail indicators on it earlier.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting hurricane23:


Thankful there rare occurences. I was in florida city right of US1 when andrews ferocious eyewall rolled through.


I was in Homestead not far from US1. It's amazing to go back to that area and see how much it's all grown. I can't imagine anything like it going through there now. Luckily building codes are much better.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: May 27, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 4438
Quoting CaneWarning:


I was in Ft. Lauderdale a few days after Wilma went through and the place was a disaster. There were skyscrapers that were missing most of their windows. Trees were down and many buildings lost their roof.

I lived through Andrew, and I can tell you that I never ever wish a storm like that on anyone. We can do without them. As fun as they are to track and watch, they are no fun when they hit land.


Thankful there rare occurences. I was in florida city right of US1 when andrews ferocious eyewall rolled through.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting plywoodstatenative:
This is the information on the cell I am speaking about: Id as F4 with max hail size of 2.25 inches Speed is 12kn and from the NW




Am I looking at the right thing, because im not seeing anything...
Member Since: May 27, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 4438
2193. IKE
Quoting TexasGulf:


"I don't want anyone to get hit.....including him. There's been enough heartache in the world lately and most of it continues....earthquake recovery...tornadoes...floods...oil volcano.">

Ike, don't be so negative. Look at the good side.

Earth has a molten mantle, which is why we have plate tectonics and hence earthquakes. If it weren't for shifting plates and earthquakes, Earth would have almost NO mountains, stagnant oceans and the planet would be primarily lifeless.

If it weren't for storms (lightning, wind, hydraulic cycle with rains & evaporation, hurricanes and other weather events) Earth would be almost completely devoid of life. Floods are just an extreme of rain, which incidentally floods are important for bringing nutrients to river valleys and creating rich agricultural land along rivers. Tornadoes are just an extreme of storms. Hurricanes, lightning and monsoons are all important for diverse life to exist on earth. Arguably, some of the richest farmlands on earth are in flood plains, downwind from mountains and in volcanic regions.

Oil is an important Earth resource, without which we wouldn't have many of the plastics, foams, gels, synthetic rubber, fuels and chemicals that make our modern society function. This oil spill is a result of careless drilling for this resource. That isn't a natural phenomenon, but it was almost inevitable to occur considering the thousands of wells drilled in the Gulf coastal waters. Yes, it's a tragedy, but Earth will overcome and renew itself. Perhaps a large Hurricane will be Earth's response to help rejuvenate the Gulf Coast and dissipate the oil.

Where you see tragedy... try instead to see Earth's majesty and forces of creation rather than destruction. We live in a constantly changing world. If the world suddenly became static and unchanging, the human race would cease to exist within a generation.



Hurricanes...tornadoes...earthquakes...floods...we can't doing anything about. I agree...they're going to happen.

The oil spill/neglect is a man made disaster that should have been avoidable.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2192. hydrus
Quoting Baltimorebirds:
Florida needs a long break after the 04 and 05 season.
Amen to that.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting StSimonsIslandGAGuy:
.


As I recall, hurricane Wilma brought hurricane force winds to Miami after Katrina did. That sounds like a hurricane hit to me.

I double-dog dare ya to post on seflagamma's blog that Wilma did not hit Miami ;) She was posting back then.


I was in Ft. Lauderdale a few days after Wilma went through and the place was a disaster. There were skyscrapers that were missing most of their windows. Trees were down and many buildings lost their roof.

I lived through Andrew, and I can tell you that I never ever wish a storm like that on anyone. We can do without them. As fun as they are to track and watch, they are no fun when they hit land.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting atmoaggie:

Ummm, what about Ida?

I don't think she was still a classified TS or TD when she crossed the shoreline...



Wow thats a very good point!
Member Since: May 27, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 4438
Quoting atmoaggie:

Ummm, what about Ida?

I don't think she was still a classified TS or TD when she crossed the shoreline...



thats a possibility too
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting StSimonsIslandGAGuy:
.


As I recall, hurricane Wilma brought hurricane force winds to Miami after Katrina did. That sounds like a hurricane hit to me.

I double-dog dare ya to post on seflagamma's blog that Wilma did not hit Miami ;) She was posting back then.


Katrina did hit metro miami as i was at tpc that night when the eyewall came right over us. If katrina had 6 hrs more of water sfl would have had a major in there hands.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Here's the Wiki page on Floyd.
Link
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Hurricanes101:


looking back I see 4 storms that they say didnt make landfall after being a Hurricane in the Gulf

If what you say about Henri is true, then 3 of those to me are incorrect

Laurie in 1969 made landfall as a tropical depression, so I am not sure why she was on the list

Alberto in 1982 was declassified pretty much in the same spot Henri was, so I would think landfall could be considered for both


That leaves only 1 storm; Hurricane Jeanne in 1980

Ummm, what about Ida?

I don't think she was still a classified TS or TD when she crossed the shoreline...

Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 6 Comments: 12463
Quoting plywoodstatenative:
Someone pull up The South Florida NexRad Composite radar map. We have what appears to be a Tornadic cell just to the Southwest of Pompano beach. I know that there is a Mesocyclone as indicated by radar.


Member Since: May 27, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 4438
This is the information on the cell I am speaking about: Id as F4 with max hail size of 2.25 inches Speed is 12kn and from the NW


Member Since: Posts: Comments:

"I don't want anyone to get hit.....including him. There's been enough heartache in the world lately and most of it continues....earthquake recovery...tornadoes...floods...oil volcano.">

Ike, don't be so negative. Look at the good side.

Earth has a molten mantle, which is why we have plate tectonics and hence earthquakes. If it weren't for shifting plates and earthquakes, Earth would have almost NO mountains, stagnant oceans and the planet would be primarily lifeless.

If it weren't for storms (lightning, wind, hydraulic cycle with rains & evaporation, hurricanes and other weather events) Earth would be almost completely devoid of life. Floods are just an extreme of rain, which incidentally floods are important for bringing nutrients to river valleys and creating rich agricultural land along rivers. Tornadoes are just an extreme of storms. Hurricanes, lightning and monsoons are all important for diverse life to exist on earth. Arguably, some of the richest farmlands on earth are in flood plains, downwind from mountains and in volcanic regions.

Oil is an important Earth resource, without which we wouldn't have many of the plastics, foams, gels, synthetic rubber, fuels and chemicals that make our modern society function. This oil spill is a result of careless drilling for this resource. That isn't a natural phenomenon, but it was almost inevitable to occur considering the thousands of wells drilled in the Gulf coastal waters. Yes, it's a tragedy, but Earth will overcome and renew itself. Perhaps a large Hurricane will be Earth's response to help rejuvenate the Gulf Coast and dissipate the oil.

Where you see tragedy... try instead to see Earth's majesty and forces of creation rather than destruction. We live in a constantly changing world. If the world suddenly became static and unchanging, the human race would cease to exist within a generation.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
The 2004 season had numerous unusual occurrences. The first named storm of the season formed on August 1, giving the season the fifth-latest start since the 1952 season. Tropical Storm Bonnie and Hurricane Charley became the first storms to sequentially hit the same U.S. state%u2014Florida%u2014within 24 hours of each other in recorded history. For the remainder of the season, Florida was hit by three more hurricanes: Frances, Ivan, and Jeanne. Credit Wikipedia: 2004 Hurricane Season Florida.

(Not sure I'd count Ivan too heavily as we dodged a bullet there. Others were notoriously not as fortunate.)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Maine Tornado warning expired, now we must wait to see if a rare touchdown occurred.
Member Since: May 27, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 4438
Just thought I would put it out there....Jim Cantore and OZ are not welcome here in Biloxi this year!!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Someone pull up The South Florida NexRad Composite radar map. We have what appears to be a Tornadic cell just to the Southwest of Pompano beach. I know that there is a Mesocyclone as indicated by radar.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2173. IKE
Impressive waves in the eastern ATL on the 18Z GFS @ 138 hours...

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting TropicalWave:
I'm anticipating numerous floyd scenerios this year, Teddy.


Unfortunatly that seems quite possible this year with the way the way the bermuda high appears to be is setting up.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2169. IKE
Quoting TropicalWave:
Remember, Ike, anything that typically comes through here. heads up towards your general direction.


I don't need any tropical system here or anywhere in the GOM this year.


Quoting StSimonsIslandGAGuy:
HurricaneKing is still around.

I miss Hawkeye.


What happened to Hawkeye...he post elsewhere?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2168. hydrus
Quoting CybrTeddy:


Imagine if Floyd at peak hit Florida..
An absolute disaster. The Miami Hurricane of 1926 was huge. they had an average windspeed of over 76 mph for over 24 hours. Gusts may have been as high as 160 mph. If that were to happen today, it would be a 100 billion dollar hurricane.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting xcool:
TropicalWave 10:12 PM GMT on June 05, 2010
Katrina had winds of 80MPH
huh


Im assuming he is talking about the Florida landfall.
Member Since: May 27, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 4438
Quoting hurricane23:
And yet there some folks in sfl who think they have been through a bonafied major. Andrew was a very small compact cyclone with an extremly powerful small core of winds that went through florida city not metropolitan dade/broward. In all honestly my fear is a repeat of the 26 miami hurricane which could amount to a disaster of epic proportions in my view.


I will agree with you on that adrian, that and because of the fact that South Florida has not been through many hurricanes people have become complacent about getting ready for a storm. Most say, they get ready each year for a storm and none come. So why then should they prepare this year.

What Storm and Patrap keep trying to pound into people's heads is true: Preparation is the key, unfortunately many have not listened.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Hurricanes101:


looking back I see 4 storms that they say didnt make landfall after being a Hurricane in the Gulf

If what you say about Henri is true, then 3 of those to me are incorrect

Laurie in 1969 made landfall as a tropical depression, so I am not sure why she was on the list

Alberto in 1982 was declassified pretty much in the same spot Henri was, so I would think landfall could be considered for both


That leaves only 1 storm; Hurricane Jeanne in 1980


Yah its actually been a bit of a debate going on at Wikipedia over it, Henri specifically but the 2 others you mention could be argued as well.
Member Since: May 27, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 4438
Quoting hurricane23:
And yet there some folks in sfl who think they have been through a bonafied major. Andrew was a very small compact cyclone with an extremly powerful small core of winds that went through florida city not metropolitan dade/broward. In all honestly my fear is a repeat of the 26 miami hurricane which could amount to a disaster of epic proportions in my view.


I guess it depends on your definition of "metropolitan" dade. Everyone south of 152nd ST had substantial winds.
Member Since: September 23, 2005 Posts: 15 Comments: 11347
2158. xcool
TropicalWave 10:12 PM GMT on June 05, 2010
Katrina had winds of 80MPH
huh
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I'm looking for the goofy map that shows the four hurricanes that criss-crossed Florida that year within a span of no more than 6 weeks, I think. Fond memories... lol
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2156. IKE
Quoting StSimonsIslandGAGuy:


That's why I count HurricaneKing as the first wishcaster ;) He's no troll though.



Seems like I remember recent posts from him.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Viewing: 2206 - 2156

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64 | 65 | 66 | 67 | 68 | 69 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 74 | 75 | 76 | 77 | 78 | 79 | 80 | 81 | 82 | 83 | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 89 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93 | 94 | 95 | 96 | 97 | 98 | 99 | 100 | 101 | 102 | 103 | 104 | 105Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

JeffMasters's Recent Photos

Lake Effort Snow Shower Over Windsor, Ontario
Sunset on Dunham Lake
Pictured Rocks Sunset
Sunset on Lake Huron