Asia records its hottest temperature in history; Category 4 Phet threatens Oman

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 1:47 PM GMT on June 02, 2010

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A hellish heat wave hit Pakistan last week, sending the mercury to an astonishing 53.5°C (128.3°F) at the town of MohenjuDaro on Wednesday May 26, reported the Pakistani Meteorological Department. While this temperature reading must be reviewed by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) for authenticity, not only is the 128.3°F reading the hottest temperature ever recorded in Pakistan, it is the hottest reliably measured temperature ever recorded on the continent of Asia. This information comes to me courtesy of Chris Burt, the author of Extreme Weather, who is probably the world's foremost expert on extreme weather records. In a collaborative effort with weather record researchers Maximiliano Herrera and Howard Rainford, Mr. Burt has painstakingly researched the extreme weather records for every country on Earth. They list the previous reliable record high for Asia as the 52.7°C (127°F) temperature measured on June 12, 1919, in the Sindh province of Pakistan. Temperatures exceed 120°F in this region of Pakistan nearly every year, in the late May/early June time frame before the monsoon arrives. Last week's heat wave killed at least 18 Pakistanis, and temperatures in excess of 50°C (122°F) were recorded at nine Pakistani cities on May 26, including 53°C (127.4°F) at Sibi.

All-time hottest temperature for Southeast Asia this month
Record heat also hit Southeast Asia in May. According to the Myanmar Department of Meteorology and Hydrology, Myanmar (Burma) had its hottest temperature in its recorded history on May 12, when the mercury hit 47°C (116.6°F) in Myinmu. Myanmar's previous hottest temperature was 45.8°C (114.4°F) at Minbu, Magwe division on May 9, 1998. According to Mr. Burt, the 47°C (116.6°F) measured on May 12 this year is the hottest temperature measured in Southeast Asia in recorded history.

Bogus extreme temperature records
I'm pleased to say that Chris Burt will be joining wunderground.com as a featured blogger later this year to discuss his work. He's working on a great new website that features weather records for each country of the world, complete with footnotes on disputed records. For example, many record books list Israel as the site of Asia's all-time maximum temperature. Mr. Burt comments: "54°C (129.2°F) has widely been quoted as the highest temperature ever recorded in Israel (and Asia) but there exist serious issues with this record. The temperature was recorded on a thermograph at Tirat Zvi on 21 June 1942. Examination of a copy of this trace (see Bio-Climatic Atlas of Israel by Dr. D. Ashbel, Central Press, Jerusalem, 1950, p.125, Figure 1) actually shows a maximum temperature of 53°C (127.4°F). No explanation is known for this 1°C discrepancy. In comparison with surrounding stations, it is likely that the actual temperature recorded at Tirat Zvi on this data was probably no higher than 52°C (125.6°F), which would be a record high temperature for Israel. Temperatures have reached or exceeded 50°C (122°F) in Israel only during this one episode in 1942.


Figure 1. Temperature trace from Bio-Climatic Atlas of Israel by Dr. D. Ashbel, Central Press, Jerusalem, 1950, p.125 for Tirat Zvi, Israel, the week of June 21, 1942.


Figure 2. Zoom of temperature trace from Bio-Climatic Atlas of Israel by Dr. D. Ashbel, Central Press, Jerusalem, 1950, p.125, for Tirat Zvi, Israel, the week of June 21, 1942. The temperature clearly only reached 53°C, if one reads the graph properly. Thus the 54°C temperature labeled on the graph is not correct.

Mr. Burt comments in his Extreme Weather book that every temperature record for the planet in excess of 129°F can be disputed. All of these records, except for the 134°F recorded at Greenland Ranch in Death Valley, California, were made by French colonial era instruments which were found to be irregular as far as the exposure of the screens used to house the temperature instruments. In some cases, the temperature instrument was housed closer to the ground than it should have been. Mr. Burt will have an in-depth analysis of the evidence later this summer when he begins blogging for us.


Figure 3. Visible satellite image of Tropical Cyclone Phet on Wednesday, June 2, 2010.

Tropical Cyclone Phet the 2nd strongest Arabian Sea storm on record
The record heat over southern Asia in May has helped heat up the Arabian Sea to 2°C above normal. The exceptionally warm SSTs have helped fuel a rare major hurricane in the Arabian Sea today, as Tropical Cyclone Phet underwent an impressive bout of rapid intensification this morning to become a Category 4 storm with 145 mph winds. Phet is a Thai word pronounced as Pet, meaning "Diamond". Intense hurricanes are rare in the Arabian Sea, due to the basin's small size, the interference of the summer monsoon, and the frequent presence of dry air and dust from the Arabian Peninsula. Phet is now the second strongest tropical cyclone ever recorded in the Arabian Sea, behind Category 5 Cyclone Gonu of 2007, which devastated Oman. Third place is held by the 2001 India Cyclone 01A and Very Severe Cyclonic Storm ARB 01 (02A), which were Category 3 storms with 125 mph winds.

Phet is over some of the warmest ocean waters on the planet, 30 - 31°C (86 - 88°F), and warm waters in excess of 26.5°C (80°F) extend to a depth of at least 50 meters (165 feet), resulting in a Tropical Cyclone Heat Potential high enough to allow Phet to attain Category 5 status. Phet is under moderate wind shear of 10 - 20 knots. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) is forecasting Phet to become a Category 5 storm later today. The storm is moving slowly north-northwest towards Oman, and could ingest dry air from the Arabian Peninsula on Thursday, resulting in weakening. It now appears likely that Phet will make landfall in Oman before recurving to the northeast and hitting Pakistan. The region of Oman likely to get hit is sparsely populated, so wind and storm surge damage will not be the main concerns. Phet will spread heavy rains over the heavily populated northern regions of Oman, which will likely cause extreme flooding. Phet has the potential to be worse for Oman than Tropical Cyclone Gonu, which did $4.2 billion in damage and killed 50 people in June 2007.

Impact on Pakistan
Phet is on track to make landfall in Pakistan or Iran after hitting Oman. Phet will be much weakened by passage over Oman, and may only be a tropical storm after crossing the Gulf of Oman and arriving at the Iran/Pakistan coast. Still, Phet's rains could easily cause destructive floods in Iran and Pakistan.

The strongest tropical cyclone on record to hit Pakistan was Very Severe Cyclonic Storm ARB 01 (02A), which hit near Karachi on May 20, 1999, as a Category 3 storm with 125 mph winds. According to Wikipedia, 02A killed 700 people did $6 million in damage (1999 USD). I've also found references to a December 15, 1965 cyclone that killed 10,000 near Karachi, Pakistan.

Oil spill update
Moderate onshore winds of 10 - 20 knots out of the southeast to southwest are expected to blow over the northern Gulf of Mexico over most of the next week, resulting increased threats of oil to Alabama, Mississippi, and the Florida Panhandle, according to the latest trajectory forecasts from NOAA. These persistent southwesterly winds will likely bring oil as far east as Fort Walton Beach, Florida, by Monday.

Oil spill resources
My post, What a hurricane would do the Deepwater Horizon oil spill
My post Wednesday with answers to some of the common questions I get about the spill
My post on the Southwest Florida "Forbidden Zone" where surface oil will rarely go
My post on what oil might do to a hurricane
Gulf Oil Blog from the UGA Department of Marine Sciences
Oil Spill Academic Task Force
University of South Florida Ocean Circulation Group oil spill forecasts
ROFFS Deepwater Horizon page
Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery from the University of Miami

I'll be back Thursday with more on Phet and an analysis of the new Colorado State University hurricane forecast issued by Phil Klotzbach and Bill Gray issued today.

Jeff Masters

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whats everyones thoughts on wave in eastern atlantic?? looks impressive for june 2nd!! thats what worries me wave this impressive now could mean trouble 6 weeks from now
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Twister rips through Lennox Head, northern New South Wales


AT LEAST one person is missing and others have been injured after a huge storm swept through the beachside town of Lennox Head on the NSW north coast.

Buildings have been destroyed and power lines brought down, while police say more people may have been hurt when what has been described as a mini-tornado hit the town about 7.30am (AEST) today.

At least one person is missing and a mother and daughter have been taken to hospital after being hit by flying debris, media reports say.

Emergency services said the picture remained unclear with numerous calls for help from residents in the area.

Police inspector Shane Dean said he could see "mini tornadoes" off the Lennox Head coast.

"As I look out at the ocean you can actually see what I'd describe as mini tornadoes out to sea," he told Channel 7.

Start of sidebar. Skip to end of sidebar.

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Resident Andy Brown told the ABC he saw a twister cross the coast.

"It sounded like a jet was coming in to land on our house," he said.

"The spiralling of the material just being ripped out the roofs as you would see in a tornado in America but just on a smaller scale.

"(There were) sheets of roofing spinning into the air and anything else that it can pick up. It's hard to explain, a friend of ours has been injured and they can't get out, no ambulances can get in because of the powerlines."

The wild storm was reportedly heading up the coast, with reports of two twisters sighted off Byron Bay, the Gold Coast Bulletin said today.

At Lennox Head, roofs were ripped off, people trapped in cars in rising flood waters and power lines felled during the freak storm.

Early reports indicate the Pacific Parade area was the worst affected after a water-spout hit the shore, with caravans and cabins at the Lake Ainsworth Caravan Park overturned.

A command post has been set up at Lennox Point Hotel, and evacuation centres have been established.

Residents have been warned to stay in their homes.

Weather Channel meteorologist Tom Saunders said the water-spout was like a mini-tornado, which produced flash flooding and damaging winds.

A severe thunderstorm warning has also been issued for the area, with large hail, very heavy rain, flash flooding and water-spouts that could produce destructive winds likely.

The affected area includes Lennox Head, Lismore, Byron Bay, Ballina, Brunswick Head and Evans Head.

Emergency services from across the region are rushing to assess the damage.

Floodwaters forced a school at Middle Pocket, near Mullumbimby, to close this morning.

Up to 185mm of rain fell in some areas last night, an SES spokesman said.

AAP
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Good evening!
Member Since: September 2, 2009 Posts: 130 Comments: 21098
Quoting pottery:

This is Really Bad news...

Good Evening all


Not necessarily bad news. They have a plan to cut the riser which has been proven to work. It won't make a clean cut, so the cap will fit loosely and won't make a good seal... but at least the riser will be capped so they can pipe the oil to surface vessels.

The change of plans may only cost a 1-day delay. What's another 12,000 - 20,000 barrels of oil among friends. The looser cap might result in extra leakage of 750 bpd vs. 200 bpd with a tighter cap.

At least BP has a plan and are ready to implement it. If they can cut the flow of oil into the Gulf to 1/10th of present, then there are always ways to improvise a decent seal later and stop excessive leakage around the cap.

It is at times like these that our ancient ancestors would have sacrificed a virgin to the sea in hopes of guaranteed success. I'd guess that 4 BP executives = 1 virgin. Let the offering begin.
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Quoting Weather456:
Tools used to track tropical waves:

Also, my blog from June 2008 "Tracking Tropical Waves", illustrates the types of waves and how to apply the available data to them.

It needs expanding to add other rising tools and you can expect a blog in the near future.



I'll definitely be looking forward to that.

On another note, I just looked at Phet this evening and it seems like it'll run into Oman after all. Bad for the people there, but good for the people in Karachi who aren't going to take a major hurricane head-on.
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Quoting SLU:


Some great points there. So far for the season it's been like one tropical wave emerging every two days.
at this pace something sooner than later is going to happen
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 170 Comments: 53479
Evening CRS, good to see ya. Yeah, I saw they cut it once already. Guess they just have to see how much damage is done to the pipe in the process and if they can still fit something on top of it.

There is no excuse for not having a contingency plan for how to deal with a broken pipe and failed blow out preventer at 5000 feet. Someone in BP likely saw an extremely low risk of this situation and high cost in developing an effective contingency plan. Goes to show that cost cutting often costs more than spending the money in the first place.
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Pott! you have mail!
Member Since: January 24, 2007 Posts: 317 Comments: 31946


..Spock raise eyebrow slightly
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 423 Comments: 127804
Tools used to track tropical waves:

Also, my blog from June 2008 "Tracking Tropical Waves", illustrates the types of waves and how to apply the available data to them.

It needs expanding to add other rising tools and you can expect a blog in the near future.

Member Since: July 24, 2005 Posts: 407 Comments: 19076
Quoting TropicalWave:
my pic appeared.


What's the left hand doing?
Member Since: July 30, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 261
Quoting StormJunkie:
the plan now was to use a large shear to cut the riser



Man those are some serious shears! This is what they cut through...


They have cut it once already:

img src="" alt="" />


18 ft. long shears with
3,000 TONS of shear force
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920. SLU
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:


from my blog with added info

Easterly Waves
Long waves occur in bands of geostrophic wind flowing above the friction layer. Long waves may flow toward the west or toward the east depending on which of the major global wind belts they occur in. Easterly waves are "long waves" that occur within the trade wind belt, start over north western Africa, and propagate toward the west in the lower tropospheric tradewind flow across the Atlantic Ocean. They are first seen usually in April or May and continue until October or November. They occur between 5-15 degrees N. They have a wavelength of about 2000 to 2500 km, a period of ~3-4 days, and move at approximately 18 - 36 km/h. Approximately two easterly waves per week travel from Africa to North America during hurricane season at the moment we have had a run of 5 waves per week since early may for a total of 15 waves this year already. Passing from the African continent onto the cool Eastern Atlantic, the waves generally decay, but remnants mostly survive to the Western Atlantic and Caribbean where they regenerate. Only 9 out of 100 easterly waves survive to develop into gale-force tropical storms, or full-fledged hurricanes.

About 60% of the Atlantic tropical storms and minor hurricanes (Saffir-Simpson Scale categories 1 and 2) originate from easterly waves. However, nearly 85% of the intense (or major) hurricanes have their origins as easterly waves. The majority of synoptic scale systems from Africa propagate beyond the Caribbean and the Central American Isthmus into the Eastern Pacific, where some intensify into Tropical Storms. It has been suggested that nearly all of the tropical cyclones that occur in the Eastern Pacific Ocean can also be traced back to Africa. Many Typhoons in the Western Pacific are also believed to develop from Easterly Waves, although more work is needed on the relationship of Easterly Waves in the Western and Eastern Pacific.


Some great points there. So far for the season it's been like one tropical wave emerging every two days.
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Amy !!!!
Hi, darlin'
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Quoting DestinJeff:


yeah but what about if you are looking to match a photo you already have ... somebody on here did that, but can't remember the details

tineye is the tool ... I already tried it. apparently JFV is smarter this go around. He didnt grab a stock photo, probably one off of Facebook (given the pixel size)
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Afternoon stormj, NRA, everyone else!
Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 23857
Quoting Ameister12:
We're getting hammered.



It's just leaving where I am now, we've been getting hit for the last hour or so.
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pott!!!!!

:)
Member Since: January 24, 2007 Posts: 317 Comments: 31946
the plan now was to use a large shear to cut the riser



Man those are some serious shears! This is what they cut through...
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Quoting CaicosRetiredSailor:
BP Searches for Another Way to Slice Through Pipe


By CAMPBELL ROBERTSON, JOSEPH BERGER and HENRY FOUNTAIN
Published: June 2, 2010

HOUMA, La. — BP officials were casting about for another way to slice through a leaking riser pipe located a mile underwater after a diamond-studded wire saw operated by a robot got stuck and was later found to be ineffective.

...
A technician involved in the effort said that the wire saw had cut less than halfway through the riser when it stopped being effective. The technician, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to comment on the work, said that it appeared that there was other material in the riser — including, perhaps, some of the objects pumped into the well during the failed “top kill” procedure last week — that was dulling the saw.

“It was cutting at a rate far less than it should have,” he said.

The technician said that rather than trying again with the saw, the plan now was to use a large shear to cut the riser. The shear, which is about 20 feet long and nearly 10 feet high, was used to make an earlier cut in the riser about 50 feet from the wellhead.

Because the shear will not make as clean a cut as the wire saw, modifications would have to be made to the containment cap that is to be lowered over the cut pipe. But the technician said that even with the switch to the shear and the modifications, he expected the containment cap could be in place by Thursday.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/03/us/03spill.html?hp

This is Really Bad news...

Good Evening all
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Quoting msgambler:
Now see wasn't that easier....LOL
Didn't answer my question but I got enough from the last post, I think, to figue it out. Thanks, Alan
456 would be the one to ask i believe he may be able to givemore info he is very good at picking them out
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 170 Comments: 53479
Quoting Weather456:


Its called a marine layer/tradewind inversion. Cool waters from the canary current along with upwelling near the African coast cools the air directly above it to its dew point and thus forming clouds. The marine layer is capped by an inversion and dry air as we discuss yesterday.





Thanks!
We're getting hammered.

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Quoting TropicalWave:
456, how profound i SAL affecting our area of interest?


It not really affecting the wave. There huge amounts of deep layer moisture near the vort max along the axis. Dry air intrusion actually begins near 8N-10N, well north of the wave nucleus. This is based on GFS soundings and backed by the sal maps.
Member Since: July 24, 2005 Posts: 407 Comments: 19076
902. DestinJeff 4:16 PM PDT on June 02, 2010
I remember when TropicalAmanda was on here someone was able to find the avatar pic on the web using some service...can't remember exactly. But the pic being used was available on the free web.


you can get photos off of photobucket.com....trust me...I'm an expert....

;)
Member Since: January 24, 2007 Posts: 317 Comments: 31946
Now see wasn't that easier....LOL
Didn't answer my question but I got enough from the last post, I think, to figue it out. Thanks, Alan
Member Since: February 27, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 1125
We're about to get hammered.
Already under a Severe T-storm warning.
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Quoting msgambler:
KOTG, could you explain that in South Alabama terms.....LOL
current wave will trek across the basin right into the epac just because you cannot see it does not mean it is not there and along the way there is always a chance to get some type of weather from it
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 170 Comments: 53479
BP Searches for Another Way to Slice Through Pipe


By CAMPBELL ROBERTSON, JOSEPH BERGER and HENRY FOUNTAIN
Published: June 2, 2010

HOUMA, La. — BP officials were casting about for another way to slice through a leaking riser pipe located a mile underwater after a diamond-studded wire saw operated by a robot got stuck and was later found to be ineffective.

...
A technician involved in the effort said that the wire saw had cut less than halfway through the riser when it stopped being effective. The technician, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to comment on the work, said that it appeared that there was other material in the riser — including, perhaps, some of the objects pumped into the well during the failed “top kill” procedure last week — that was dulling the saw.

“It was cutting at a rate far less than it should have,” he said.

The technician said that rather than trying again with the saw, the plan now was to use a large shear to cut the riser. The shear, which is about 20 feet long and nearly 10 feet high, was used to make an earlier cut in the riser about 50 feet from the wellhead.

Because the shear will not make as clean a cut as the wire saw, modifications would have to be made to the containment cap that is to be lowered over the cut pipe. But the technician said that even with the switch to the shear and the modifications, he expected the containment cap could be in place by Thursday.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/03/us/03spill.html?hp
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Quoting weather42009:


How can clouds be in dust?


Its called a marine layer/tradewind inversion. Cool waters from the canary current along with upwelling near the African coast cools the air directly above it to its dew point and thus forming clouds. The marine layer is capped by an inversion and dry air as we discuss yesterday.



Member Since: July 24, 2005 Posts: 407 Comments: 19076
Quoting HurricaneSwirl:


I remember you, did you get anything from this? We didn't get a drop and we're in Macon as well, though the rumbles have been going on for a while. We had a hailstorm on Sunday though. It's been like this forever... And it doesn't look like these storms are stopping soon by the look of our hazardous weather outlook.


Hi Swirl, sent you a WU-mail.
Member Since: September 3, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 20854
The formation of tropical cyclones is the topic of extensive ongoing research and is still not fully understood. While six factors appear to be generally necessary, tropical cyclones may occasionally form without meeting all of the following conditions. In most situations, water temperatures of at least 26.5 °C (79.7 °F) are needed down to a depth of at least 50 metres (160 ft); waters of this temperature cause the overlying atmosphere to be unstable enough to sustain convection and thunderstorms. Another factor is rapid cooling with height, which allows the release of the heat of condensation that powers a tropical cyclone.High humidity is needed, especially in the lower-to-mid troposphere; when there is a great deal of moisture in the atmosphere, conditions are more favorable for disturbances to develop. Low amounts of wind shear are needed, as high shear is disruptive to the storm's circulation. Tropical cyclones generally need to form more than 555 kilometres (345 mi) or 5 degrees of latitude away from the equator, allowing the Coriolis effect to deflect winds blowing towards the low pressure center and creating a circulation. Lastly, a formative tropical cyclone needs a pre-existing system of disturbed weather, although without a circulation no cyclonic development will take place.
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 170 Comments: 53479
i think someone slipped james carville a sedative.
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KOTG, could you explain that in South Alabama terms.....LOL
Member Since: February 27, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 1125
Quoting msgambler:
I wonder if I can ask a question. Is there any reason this wave can't just continue until it gets into a favorable area? Does it have to form or die right now? Isn't there a possibility of this to drift or move westerly/wnwesterly until in an area for development?


from my blog with added info

Easterly Waves
Long waves occur in bands of geostrophic wind flowing above the friction layer. Long waves may flow toward the west or toward the east depending on which of the major global wind belts they occur in. Easterly waves are "long waves" that occur within the trade wind belt, start over north western Africa, and propagate toward the west in the lower tropospheric tradewind flow across the Atlantic Ocean. They are first seen usually in April or May and continue until October or November. They occur between 5-15 degrees N. They have a wavelength of about 2000 to 2500 km, a period of ~3-4 days, and move at approximately 18 - 36 km/h. Approximately two easterly waves per week travel from Africa to North America during hurricane season at the moment we have had a run of 5 waves per week since early may for a total of 15 waves this year already. Passing from the African continent onto the cool Eastern Atlantic, the waves generally decay, but remnants mostly survive to the Western Atlantic and Caribbean where they regenerate. Only 9 out of 100 easterly waves survive to develop into gale-force tropical storms, or full-fledged hurricanes.

About 60% of the Atlantic tropical storms and minor hurricanes (Saffir-Simpson Scale categories 1 and 2) originate from easterly waves. However, nearly 85% of the intense (or major) hurricanes have their origins as easterly waves. The majority of synoptic scale systems from Africa propagate beyond the Caribbean and the Central American Isthmus into the Eastern Pacific, where some intensify into Tropical Storms. It has been suggested that nearly all of the tropical cyclones that occur in the Eastern Pacific Ocean can also be traced back to Africa. Many Typhoons in the Western Pacific are also believed to develop from Easterly Waves, although more work is needed on the relationship of Easterly Waves in the Western and Eastern Pacific.
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893. xcool
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892. xcool
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891. xcool
so gfs and ngp
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Quoting Weather456:
And last...dust blowing off Africa



How can clouds be in dust?
Quoting weathersp:


Wheres the KML/KMZ file for that?


I think there are some on the MODIS site, not sure. But these are image overlays done by me.
Member Since: July 24, 2005 Posts: 407 Comments: 19076


little late on big picture latest as of 601 next just after 9
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 170 Comments: 53479
Portlight.org has been sheltering and sending aid since early February to Haiti.

With the Help of many bloggers,and folks from around the globe, the wunderground and Jeff Masters,..we can make a difference in a lotta ways.

Please support us this Season as it takes funding to make a difference.

And were thankful to the christopher reeve foundation for their Kind and generous grant to help us make a difference in those unable to help them selves.


portlight.org



www.christopherreeve.org



So many of our dreams at first seem impossible, then they seem improbable, and then, when we summon the will, they soon become inevitable.
Christopher Reeve




Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 423 Comments: 127804
And last...dust blowing off Africa

Member Since: July 24, 2005 Posts: 407 Comments: 19076
Quoting Baltimorebirds:
I agree.It is also to far south to catch the earths rotation.By any chance dose anyone know how to post an avatar.I tried to find out how to do it and it sounded like confusing.I tried to google it but that was an epic fail.


I'm in Baltimore too....

(but I'm only a lurker.... 4 1/2 years)
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Quoting Weather456:
You can see the surface outflow boundary below mid-upper clouds...



Surreal




Wheres the KML/KMZ file for that?
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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