Flooding death toll in Southeast U.S. floods rises to 24; oil slick moving little

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:11 PM GMT on May 04, 2010

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The death toll from last weekend's record flooding in Tennessee, Kentucky, and Mississippi has risen to 24, making it the deadliest non-tropical storm or hurricane flood disaster in the U.S. since the October 1998 Central Texas floods that killed 31 when a cold front stalled over Texas. As flood waters recede today, the toll from last weekend's floods is expected to grow higher. Particularly hard-hit was the Nashville, Tennessee area, where ten fatalities were reported. The city had its heaviest 1-day and 2-day rainfall amounts in its history over the weekend. A remarkable 7.25" of rain fell on the city Sunday, breaking the record for most rain in a single day (6.60", set September 13, 1979.) Nashville's third greatest day of rainfall on record occurred Saturday, when 6.32" fell. Nashville also eclipsed its greatest 6-hour and 12-hour rainfall events on record, with 5.57" and 7.20", respectively, falling on Sunday. And, only two days into the month, the weekend rains made it the rainiest May in Nashville's history.

Rainfall records were smashed all across Tennessee, Kentucky, and northern Mississippi over the weekend, with amounts as high as 17.73" recorded at Camden, TN, and 17.02" at Brownsville, TN. According to Chris Burt, the author of the excellent book Extreme Weather, the 13.30" that fell on Camden in 24 hours just missed eclipsing the state's all-time 24-hour precipitation record, the 13.60" inches that fell on Milan on September 13, 1982. Jackson, Tennessee had its rainiest day in its 63-year weather history on Sunday, 7.93". Bowling Green Kentucky had its heaviest 2-day precipitation event on record, 9.67". Records in Bowling Green go back to 1870.


Figure 1. Satellite-estimated precipitable water at 23 UTC (7 pm EDT) Sunday, May 2, 2010. Precipitable water is a measure of how much rain would be produced if all the water vapor and cloud moisture through the depth of the atmosphere were to fall as rain. Values above 50 mm (about 2 inches) are frequently associated with flooding. Sunday's precipitable water image showed a tropical disturbance crossed Mexico into the Gulf of Mexico, dragging a plume of very moist air northwards over the Southeast U.S. Image credit: University of Wisconsin GOES Satellite Blog.


Figure 2. Flood forecast for the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. Image credit: NOAA.

The record rains were accompanied by a surge of very warm air that set record high temperature marks at 21 major airports across the Eastern U.S. on Saturday. This is not surprising, since more moisture can evaporate into warmer air, making record-setting rainfall events more likely when record high temperatures are present. Accompanying this warm air was moisture from a tropical disturbance that crossed over Mexico from the tropical East Pacific over the weekend (Figure 1.)

The record rains sent the Cumberland River in downtown Nashville surging to 51.86' this morning, 12' over flood height, and the highest level the river has reached since a flood control project was completed in the early 1960s. The previous post-flood control project record level was 47.6', set on March 15, 1975 (the river hit 56.2' in 1929, before the flood control project was built.) The river has now crested (Figure 2) and is expected to recede below flood stage by Wednesday morning. There are no further rains in the forecast this week for Tennessee. At least four rivers in Tennessee reached their greatest flood heights on record this week. Most remarkable was the Duck River at Centreville, which crested at 47', a full 25 feet above flood stage, and ten feet higher than the previous record crest, achieved in 1948 (to check out the flood heights, use our wundermap for Nashville with the "USGS River" layer turned on.)

Funding issues to take 17 Tennessee streamgages offline
According to the USGS web site, seventeen Tennessee streamflow gages with records going back up to 85 years will stop collecting data on July 1 because of budget cuts. With up to eighteen people in Tennessee dying from flooding this weekend, now hardly seems to be the time to be skimping on monitoring river flow levels by taking 17 of Tennessee's 94 streamflow gages out of service. These gages are critical for proper issuance of flood warnings to people in harm's way. Furthermore, Tennessee and most of the northern 2/3 of the U.S. can expect a much higher incidence of record flooding in coming decades. This will be driven by two factors: increased urban development causing faster run-off, and an increase in very heavy precipitation events due to global warming. Both factors have already contributed to significant increases in flooding events in recent decades over much of the U.S. The USGS web site advertises that users who can contribute funding for the non-Federal share of costs to continue operation of these streamgages should contact Shannon Williams of the USGS Tennessee Water Science Center at 615-837-4755 or swilliam@usgs.gov. Tennessee is not the only state with streamgages at risk of closing down; fully 276 gages in 37 states have been shut down or will be shut down later this year. If you have questions about specific streamgages, click on the state of concern on the USGS web page of threatened stream gages.

Oil spill update
The oil slick from the April 20 explosion and blowout of the offshore oil rig Deepwater Horizon has retreated from the coast, thanks to a slackening of the persistent onshore winds that have affected the northern Gulf of Mexico over the past week. According to the latest NWS marine forecast, winds will be light and variable through Wednesday, resulting in little transport of the oil slick. Winds will then resume a weak onshore flow at 5 - 10 knots, Thursday through Friday, then reverse to blow offshore at 5 - 10 knots over the weekend. The net result of this wind pattern will be little transport of the oil slick. The only areas at risk of landfalling oil over the next five days will be the mouth of the Mississippi River in Louisiana, and the Chandeleur Islands. The latest forecast of Gulf currents from the NOAA HYCOM model (see also this alternative view of the HYCOM ocean current forecast) show weak ocean currents affecting the region during the remainder of the week. These currents will not be strong enough to push any oil southwards into the Loop Current over the next five days, so the Keys and South Florida are safe from oil for now. I'll have a post on the long-range prospects for oil to enter the Loop Current later this week, and a discussion of how a hurricane might affect and be affected by the oil spill.


Figure 3. Forecast location at 6pm CDT Tuesday, May 4, 2010, of the oil slick from the Deepwater Horizon blowout. Image credit: NOAA Office of Response and Restoration. See also the trajectory maps available at State of Louisiana web site.

Jeff Masters

Alice Aycock sculpture (laughingjester)
If you saw my other pics of this sculpture you cam get an idea how high the Cumberland river has risen. when I left it was still getting higher.
Alice Aycock sculpture
Harpeth River Flooding (XMLP)
Harpeth River Flooding
Removing the flood damaged cars and trucks. (laughingjester)
I am a wrecker driver for Martin's wrecker service. We were called to remove the vehicles that got caught in the flooding on interstate I 24 westbound near the Bell Road exit in Nashville Tennessee. Of course this is after the waters had subsided. It was roughly 200, 250 cars and trucks that got caught up in the flood..
Removing the flood damaged cars and trucks.
Nashville Flooding (jadnash)
This is looking east - the Cumberland River is just on the other side of the buildings.
Nashville Flooding
Parking via Mother Nature (jadnash)
This car drove into the swiftly moving water at the Belle Meade Kroger and was thrown up against a parking deck. Luckily someone got a ladder and dropped it down to break the rear window and the driver climbed out safely!
Parking via Mother Nature

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An interesting side note about BP and liability. BP and US Fish and Wildlife are overseeing the wildlife response. BP is requiring ALL responders/volunteers to take their hazmat/safety training. So even professional rehabbers, etc who have had oiled bird training and eperience, as well as hazmat training, now are scrambling to sign up for BP's own training, which it looks like they'll be offering in various locations.
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Best of luck containing that nasty oil spill.

Last month it was a bit of fun posting a few pictures of spring here and advising that we still had plently of cold available to generate some wet and potentially very severe weather on your side of the 49th.

Now this is just getting stupid. It was snowing heavily at 7 am this morning. It now after noon and it has just about stopped. ENOUGH ALREADY!!

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Quoting presslord:



...yea...that's a pretty big word for a Georgia grad...
Fiduciary? Press has just been watching "Mary Poppins." It's in a song there about the "Fidelity Fiduciary Bank."
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I found a couple of good estimate articles:

Drop in BP stock prices = a loss of 25 Billion for the company.

They can only be sued for 75 million before the Oil Spill Liability Trust fund kicks in and up to a max of 2.7 Billion.
But if they are penalized a years worth of profits in punitive damages that is 20 billion right there.
(conservative est. with lost production, 1.46, clean-up 8, penalties 2, legal fees 3, Lawsuits and settlements 20 =
34.5 billion (-1.6 drain the oil spill liability trust fund)
http://beforeitsnews.com/story/39459/BPs_oil_spill_costs_will_likely_exceed_30_billion.html
Total Cost:$33 billion
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Economic damages have already exceeded $75 Million. We reached that point within the first week of the spill being announced.

If the law states that BP's liability beyond cleanup costs cannot exceed $75 Million... then the law is the law. They won't voluntarily pay more than required.

However, the federal government is not helpless in this... they have a nice bit of leverage over BP to pay for the financial damages.

First of all, who is to say How Clean is Clean? The EPA... that's who. If BP is responsible for cleanup, you could make them spend $10 Billion on cleanup until every grain of sand is hand buffed & polished... unless they'd rather pay the financial damage claims and then do reasonable cleanup costs instead.

Secondly, the federal government has responsibility to inspect all of BP's offshore platforms and shut-off valves for safety. Those inspections can take months, or even years if you want to be really, really picky... meanwhile they can't operate those rigs until declared safe... unless they'd like to contribute to the Gulf Coast Fund to repay damages.

Thirdly, the government can ammend the law so that future incidents may have a financial cap of $10 Billion dollars per incident. The day the well is capped, the initial incident ends. Then, all lingering oil issues or left over residue opens up a new incident. Since the new incident started after the law was changed... then the new liability amounts come into play.

The federal government shouldn't overplay their hand, but they do have one HUGE stick to make BP repay reasonable financial damages to the communities affected.
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Quoting tomas5tex:


You have head the nail on the head. There are groups in this country that will raise a stink about drilling for oil and our government lets them rant and rave and give into them. The government does not care if it drive companies to buy from foreign sources. They spend billions and billons buying oil when they could use that money to put people to work in our country by building drilling rigs and exploring for oil. The extra jobs that it would create if the restriction were lifted is endless. When we open up those jobs then lots of other industries will also benefits from it. From the drilling companies to the hamburger joint would benefit. Our government need to take quit thinking about how to line their pockets and start thinking of how to put money in the peoples pockets.


So let me get this straight: despite the fact that we have what is potentially the worst oil spill in history going on in the Gulf of Mexico, one that will certainly cause environmental damage for generations to come, an oil spill that will at the very least cripple a 10 billion dollar a year industry (fishing) and cripple another (tourism) 10 billion dollar a year industry you want to expand drilling?

Wow...that's an interesting point of view, to say the least...you do realize, of course, that the more oil they find, the less they want to drill, right? That there's a make/break cost per barrel, so that if oil goes below say, $85 a barrel they start to lay people off and slow down exploration, right? Or were you not aware of that?
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That first oil dome is to be lowered on Thursday now....
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I have a silly question.....If LA blocks the oil from entering the marshes and MS, AL & FL do the same thing, where will the oil go??? Are we going to have to keep doing this everytime the wind changes direction???
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Quoting SAINTHURRIFAN:
good day" i do not mean to start a fuss just want to state a couple facts. i live on the ms.coast so my concern over the oil spill is very serious, but a simple fact that no one has bothered to bring up really suprises me. i am well aware that most people on this sight including Masters are liberal which is thier choice, fir if you tune into fox you get a right wing view and most of the rest a liberal view. now the fact is if NOAA is right, and thier is a chance this could leak millions of gallons of oil a day: then we have many rigs in the gulf. we have the potential to build many more rigs in our federal waters, so in conclusion if these rigs can pump this much oil here is the million dollar question no body has asked why should we depend on foriegn oil? we need to make sure its safe first and foremost but the jobs and economic impact for the country would be astounding. the awnser all these years is simple its politics and a lot of brave men in our military have died fighting for it, as far back as North africa in ww2 was over the control of the oil fields.may we all get through this with the best and turn to GOD almighty for his help. have a blessed day.


You have head the nail on the head. There are groups in this country that will raise a stink about drilling for oil and our government lets them rant and rave and give into them. The government does not care if it drive companies to buy from foreign sources. They spend billions and billons buying oil when they could use that money to put people to work in our country by building drilling rigs and exploring for oil. The extra jobs that it would create if the restriction were lifted is endless. When we open up those jobs then lots of other industries will also benefits from it. From the drilling companies to the hamburger joint would benefit. Our government need to take quit thinking about how to line their pockets and start thinking of how to put money in the peoples pockets.
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200,000 gallons a day of oil spewing as crews wait

Restaurateurs, hotel owners, fishermen and beachfront property owners watched and waited for the weather and ocean currents to determine where a bulk of the oil from a calamitous Gulf of Mexico spill would finally wash ashore.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 415 Comments: 125736
113. xcool
pat nice image...
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112. RM706
Quoting Patrap:
To be sur.e..Im not a conspiracy typr atall.
But Imagery has been,er..had to come by,since ESL hasnt updated their grids in awhile.

Unless someone else has a key to MODIS stuff...?

I lost mine,well..they kinda,well..thats not really important now,..

LOL




HAHAHAHAHA! This is a consipiracy website after all /duck
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Okay, here you go, in regards to liability for the spill; it seems that BP is completely on the hook ofr the clean up; there is no limit to liability there, but:

"WASHINGTON – A federal law may limit how much BP has to pay for damages such as lost wages and economic suffering in the Gulf Coast oil spill, despite President Barack Obama's assurances that taxpayers will not be on the hook.

A law passed in response to the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill in Alaska makes BP responsible for cleanup costs. But the law sets a $75 million limit on other kinds of damages.

Economic losses to the Gulf Coast are likely to exceed that. In response, several Democratic senators introduced legislation Monday to raise the liability limit to $10 billion, though it was not clear that it could be made to apply retroactively."


I vaguely remember when that law was passed because there was a fairly large hue and cry about limiting any company for this sort of thing...
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I'll never use BP gas again. If a lot of people do this it will teach them a lesson about treaty the little people Badly.
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I like dis un..


Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 415 Comments: 125736
To be sure,..Im not a conspiracy type atall.

But Imagery has been,er..hard to come by,since ESL hasnt updated their grids in awhile.

Unless someone else has a key to MODIS stuff...?

I lost mine,well..they kinda,well..thats not really important now,..


LOL

ESL by LSU
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 415 Comments: 125736
Quoting presslord:


I believe there's a statutory limit to their financial exposure in this...others more adept at research can confirm this...or deny it...but if there is, you can bet your hat they'll exhaust every means available to avoid exceeding that...


I'm looking ont that...I heard something along those lines recently...
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Quoting RM706:
Pat, do you have any current satelite shots of the spill?


I'm still awaiting word, but it looks to me that the area was to cloudy for a good pass.
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105. xcool
MJO- OH BEHAVE!

The collapsing nino means the 40-day wave... or as it is more commonly known, the MJO... is looking like it is getting better behaved. The warmth of the nino waters really distorts the "movement" of this wave as the very warm waters act like a magnet to keep its upward motion from advancing east. Conversely, the very cold waters of a La Nina can have the effect of "stalling" it also, but instead of over the Pacific, it's back more toward the Indian Ocean. In any case, it is in its octants know where the wildest U.S. weather usually occurs. Its forecast
by joe..
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Quoting DestinJeff:


woah, Press! "fiduciary"? you better take a breather after using that kind of language! we need you around during the season!



...yea...that's a pretty big word for a Georgia grad...
Member Since: August 13, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 10458
...thus...I'd be in favor of giving a good hard look at nationalizing the oil industry...
Member Since: August 13, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 10458
in fact...to belabor the point...their corporate Board and officers have a fiduciary responsibility to limit their liability...
Member Since: August 13, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 10458
100. MahFL
Well they tried to get fishermen to sign waivers, they are greedy uncaring "bar stewards" really. Also the less they have to pay means their stock value will go up, which is what it's all about.
Member Since: June 9, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 2913
Quoting SAINTHURRIFAN:
why should we depend on foriegn oil? .. the awnser all these years is simple its politics

Gulf of Mexico estimated reserves: 21 billion barrels [2006]
Annual US oil consumption: 21 million barrels/day [2007]

That's less than 3 years' worth of oil.
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Quoting Floodman:


There's the courts...how much property does BP have in the US? Guess we could freeze their assets...how does that grab ya, BP? How about we hold on to 40 or 50 billion in your property and banking assets? Now about that plan you refuse to fund...


I believe there's a statutory limit to their financial exposure in this...others more adept at research can confirm this...or deny it...but if there is, you can bet your hat they'll exhaust every means available to avoid exceeding that...
Member Since: August 13, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 10458
Stormchaser2007 i doo
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Quoting MahFL:
What if BP says NO WE WON'T FUND THAT PLAN...?

BTW, why would they say no to funding the clean up?
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hi guys whats up with tropical waves
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good day" i do not mean to start a fuss just want to state a couple facts. i live on the ms.coast so my concern over the oil spill is very serious, but a simple fact that no one has bothered to bring up really suprises me. i am well aware that most people on this sight including Masters are liberal which is thier choice, fir if you tune into fox you get a right wing view and most of the rest a liberal view. now the fact is if NOAA is right, and thier is a chance this could leak millions of gallons of oil a day: then we have many rigs in the gulf. we have the potential to build many more rigs in our federal waters, so in conclusion if these rigs can pump this much oil here is the million dollar question no body has asked why should we depend on foriegn oil? we need to make sure its safe first and foremost but the jobs and economic impact for the country would be astounding. the awnser all these years is simple its politics and a lot of brave men in our military have died fighting for it, as far back as North africa in ww2 was over the control of the oil fields.may we all get through this with the best and turn to GOD almighty for his help. have a blessed day.
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Pat, do you have any current satelite shots of the spill?
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Quoting Floodman:


There's the courts...how much property does BP have in the US? Guess we could freeze their assets...how does that grab ya, BP? How about we hold on to 40 or 50 billion in your property and banking assets? Now about that plan you refuse to fund...


They caused to much damage, too many people are watching for them to get away with this. Watch how the public will react.

I think they should have to pay for there mistakes and they will.
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Quoting MahFL:
What if BP says NO WE WON'T FUND THAT PLAN...?


There's the courts...how much property does BP have in the US? Guess we could freeze their assets...how does that grab ya, BP? How about we hold on to 40 or 50 billion in your property and banking assets? Now about that plan you refuse to fund...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
What if BP says NO WE WON'T FUND THAT PLAN...?
Member Since: June 9, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 2913
100504-O-0000X-001 Oil Spill predicted trajectory

Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 415 Comments: 125736
This line continues to move across the entire state of NY along the thruway...

SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS WILL BE NEAR... ST. JOHNSVILLE BY 145 PM EDT... CAROGA LAKE BY 150 PM EDT... CAROGA LAKE PUBLIC CAMPGROUND AND FORT PLAIN BY 155 PM EDT... AMES... EPHRATAH AND CANAJOHARIE BY 200 PM EDT... MAYFIELD... JOHNSTOWN AND GLOVERSVILLE BY 210 PM EDT...

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Quoting NoNamePub:
Hey All -
Guess who else is back -
Watching a whole new point in the topics -
I will be saying ALOHA in July!


Hey, man, wazzup?
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Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Response/www.deepwaterhorizonresponse.com

Gulf of Mexico-Transocean Drilling Incident

DATE: May 04, 2010 12:31:27 CST
Media Advisory: Unified Area Command Subject Matter Experts to hold conference call from Robert, La.

* Report oiled shoreline or request volunteer information:
(866)-448-5816
* Submit alternative response technology, services or products:
(281) 366-5511
* Submit your vessel as a vessel of opportunity skimming system:
(281) 366-5511
* Submit a claim for damages:
(800) 440-0858
* Report oiled wildlife:
(866) 557-1401





Deepwater Horizon Incident
Joint Information Center

Phone: (985) 902-5231
(985) 902-5240











WHAT: There will be a question and answer conference call following today's press conference.

WHO: Subject matter experts from the U.S. Coast Guard National Strike Force and NOAA

WHEN: Tuesday, May 4, 2010 at 4 p.m. CDT. The call-in number for this event: (877) 918-5750. International callers use (312) 470-7364 Password – RESPONSE (73776673).


If media calls in for press conference at 3 p.m., media may remain on the line for the follow-on Q&A session.

NOTE: This is a conference call. Media SHOULD NOT send representatives to the Robert, La. location for this event.

Broadcast-quality video of this Subject Matter Expert session may be available on the Digital Video Information Distribution System (DVIDS) hub, which can be accessed at www.dvidshub.net.

To download this video, media must register with DVIDS no later than 3:45 p.m. This can be done on the DVIDS Web site or by calling (678) 421-6612.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 415 Comments: 125736
just went through the first severe thunderstorm of the year. No hail but I had to turn the lights on because it got so dark. 60mph winds, heavy rain with big drops, lots of lightning. To think we had snow showers a week ago at this exact time!!

Issued by The National Weather Service
Binghamton, NY
1:08 pm EDT, Tue., May. 4, 2010

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN BINGHAMTON HAS ISSUED A

* SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING FOR... CENTRAL MADISON COUNTY IN CENTRAL NEW YORK... SOUTHEASTERN ONEIDA COUNTY IN CENTRAL NEW YORK... NORTH CENTRAL OTSEGO COUNTY IN CENTRAL NEW YORK...

* UNTIL 215 PM EDT

* AT 103 PM EDT... NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DOPPLER RADAR INDICATED A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM CAPABLE OF PRODUCING QUARTER SIZE HAIL... AND DAMAGING WINDS IN EXCESS OF 60 MPH. THIS STORM WAS LOCATED NEAR CLINTON... AND MOVING EAST AT 60 MPH.

* THE SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WILL BE NEAR... 9 MILES NORTH OF RICHFIELD SPRINGS BY 126 PM EDT...

WHEN YOU CAN DO SO SAFELY... PLEASE REPORT HAIL... OR DAMAGING WINDS TO THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BY CALLING TOLL FREE AT 1-877-633-6772... OR BY EMAIL AT BGM.STORMREPORT@NOAA.GOV.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

IF YOU ARE IN THE PATH OF THIS STORM... SEEK SHELTER INDOORS AND STAY AWAY FROM WINDOWS!

&&
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I'm glad Louisiana officials are being proactive, sharing resources and information. By mobilizing their resources now, they may prevent some of the worst effects of the oil spill on the environment.

This is a stressful time for all involved. It's more stressful still if you don't have a clear plan of action. I'm glad Louisiana's governer and parish leaders are stepping up to the task and working together so closely.
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ESL By LSU
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 415 Comments: 125736
In other Flood related news,...

They found Noah's Ark..

..again
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 415 Comments: 125736
Detecting the spill.

They use satellite measured surface roughness to estimate surface wind speeds over the ocean.
The oil slick changes surface tension and smoothes surface roughness. Can the wind speed detector be used to find the edge of the oil slick?
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Blog went quiet zzzzzzzzz
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Hey All -
Guess who else is back -
Watching a whole new point in the topics -
I will be saying ALOHA in July!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:


LoopEATL

From the 8 AM NHC Discussion
ATLANTIC OCEAN...
STRONG UPPER LEVEL RIDGE OF HIGH PRESSURE IS OVER THE WESTERN ATLANTIC SUPPORTING A NEAR STATIONARY SURFACE HIGH NEAR 28N65W. A COLD FRONT IS OVER THE CENTRAL ATLANTIC ENTERING THE DISCUSSION AREA THROUGH 32N30W CONTINUING WEST-SOUTHWEST ALONG 25N37W 24N47W. WEAK SCATTERED SHOWERS ARE WITHIN 30 NM OF THE
FRONT...BUT NO EVIDENT CONVECTION IS SEEN WEST OF 40W. THIS FRONT IS SUPPORTED BY AN UPPER LEVEL TROUGH OVER THE NORTH CENTRAL ATLANTIC NORTH OF 30N BETWEEN 25W AND 55W. TO THE EAST
OF THIS FRONT...A REMNANT CLOUD/SHEAR LINE IS ALONG 30N31W 21N40W 18N51W. WEAK ISOLATED SHOWERS ARE WITHIN 30 NM ON EITHER SIDE OF THE LINE. THIS LINE WILL CONTINUE TO SLOWLY DISSIPATE OVER THE NEXT 24 HOURS. ALSO...LOOK FOR THE COLD FRONT TO MOVE SLOWLY EASTWARD OVER THE NEXT 24 HOURS WITH SHOWERS.
Member Since: July 11, 2006 Posts: 14 Comments: 11047
For Immediate Release:



Governor Jindal Highlights Coastal Parish Plans Sent to Coast Guard and BP

Governor Jindal Highlights Coastal Parish Plans Sent to Coast Guard and BP
For Release On:

May 04, 2010
Baton Rouge: Governor Bobby Jindal highlighted the coastal parish plans to protect the state's wetlands from the effects of oil that continues to spill into the Gulf at an estimated rate of around 210,000 gallons a day. The coastal plans detail parish and state coordinated efforts to protect the coast from the effects of the oil and they were submitted to the Coast Guard for approval and BP for authorization last night. The full plans are available on www.lacpra.org.

Governor Jindal said, We have asked BP for their plans to address the oil leak many times over the last two weeks since this leak began and it became clear that there was no detailed plan to address an incident on this scale.

On Saturday, we met with Parish leaders here at GOSHEP to incorporate input and guidance from parish leaders who know the best ways to protect their own areas. Saturday night, leaders from all across coastal Louisiana in Baton Rouge and we asked Plaquemines Parish President Billy Nungesser and St. Tammany Parish President Kevin Davis to demonstrate the plan they developed, as an example of how other coastal parish leaders could develop their own plans.

Yesterday, we met with the President and we briefed him on our work here to develop our own response plans in coordination with local leaders. We also flew over the oil spill area. We stressed to the President yesterday that to support these plans we would need two things one: funding from BP, and two: approval from the Coast Guard Incident Commander. The President made clear that he supported these efforts and he was glad that the state and parishes were leaning forward and creating their own plans to respond to this incident.

He said he was committed to having BP pay for the response to this spill and working to get a streamlined approval process in place so our coastal parish leaders can quickly begin to get their primary and in some cases also their secondary and third defense systems in place to protect our wetlands.

I want to reiterate again this spill fundamentally threatens our way of life in Louisiana. That is why we didnt just want to sit down with Plaquemines and St. Bernard Parishes this weekend we called on every parish president all along the coast of Louisiana. We want to have a comprehensive plan in place for wherever the oil moves. We know the slick of oil in the water continues to be quickly- changing and we must be prepared to mitigate the effects of the oil on our coast no matter where it moves.

Last night, we submitted worst-case scenario detailed plans for all coastal parishes, requesting hard boom, absorbent boom and other resources for secondary lines of defense, including jack up barges for staging and quick deployment of booms. The plans also include requests for Coast Guard training of fishermen at specific sites established all along the Louisiana coast.

These plans are aimed at preventing oil from entering our coastal waters and minimizing the impact of oil on our fragile wetlands and marine wildlife. I want to highlight that while these plans must be approved by the Coast Guard and funded by BP, it is the people of Louisiana who will make them work. It is our own people in coastal communities all across the state who stand ready, willing and able to protect their homes, their businesses and their way of life who will make these plans work. They will help make these plans work. Each parish plan calls for fishermen to help deploy many of the primary and secondary lines of defense called for in their plans.

Leaning Forward with Response Efforts

The Governor also said that the state is planning in the event that the effects of the oil spill become a worst-case scenario situation.

Governor Jindal said state officials met with the Coast Guard in Venice yesterday and requested several resources in anticipation of the additional response resources these parish plans would need in order to respond to a worst-case scenario of the spill that could impact any area of the Louisiana coastline.

Governor Jindal said, Because the well remains unstable and there is no certainty that the situation will not deteriorate, we developed our worst-case scenario request for resources. A worst-case scenario plan would require three million more feet of absorbent boom, five million more feet of hard boom, 30 jack up barges, and the Coast Guard to prepare to train fishermen to layout and monitor boom.

I want to be clear that we do not expect to get these resources tomorrow; however, considering the timeframe for turning around the requests we have made to the Coast Guard and BP to date, we wanted to lean forward and request the resources required to protect coastal Louisiana under the worst case scenario. We will continue to be in constant communication with the Coast Guard and BP on our resource needs.

We pre-ordered these resources to give the Coast Guard a jump start on getting the funding for them approved by BP and getting us ahead of the curve on implementing these parish plans. The plans we submitted to BP and the Coast Guard last night are initial response plans and we are working with parishes now to develop supplemental plans that anticipate greater threats to our coast.

It is important to point out that we will stage boom at critical locations so it can be deployed within 48 hours in the event oil shifts in the water. In the immediate response phase, parishes will also work to establish regional staging areas for supplies. They will also immediately begin to inventory, identify and organize multiple shore bases and begin to train local fisherman and others to be involved in clean up efforts. The plans also detail action steps for when oil is five miles away from the coast, 36 hours away, and then throughout the impact of oil on the coast.

Our first priorities are the primary areas affected by the oil St. Bernard and Plaquemines Parishes. St. Bernard Parish has 35,000 feet of hard boom in hand. Their immediate request is for a total of 74,000 feet of hard boom. President Nungesser said Plaquemines Parish is aggressively staging and deploying 24 miles or 126,720 feet of absorbent boom and more than 100,000 feet of hard boom. They also planning to stage multiple jack up barges. I plan to visit President Nungesser tomorrow in Plaquemines as they activate their first jack up barge in their response efforts.

Booms

Governor Jindal also detailed some of the key materials included in the worst-case scenario coastal parish plans.

Governor Jindal said,There are numerous critical areas along the marsh edge that have been identified as strategically located for deployment of boom measures to minimize the entrance of the oil into the interior marsh areas. We estimate that approximately 760,000 feet of boom would be needed to address the worst-case scenario plans. This includes a number of critical areas located throughout the Louisiana coast, from the Mississippi State line at the Pearl River to Sabine Pass at the Texas State line.

The effectiveness of implementing booming strategies will depend on site-specific conditions, such as water velocities, tidal influence, wind speed, and wave height. The plans also include tactics referred to as Towed Boom Measures, Anchored Boom Measures, Barge Boom Measures, and Retention Booms all depending on the conditions and the environmental sensitivities in a certain area.

Absorbents

Governor Jindal added that to supplement booming activities, absorbent materials including cotton booms, pads, and/or loose material - will be used to collect the initial amounts of oil and will be managed onsite to minimize the amounts of oil that may penetrate the booms.

The Governor said, Absorbent booms or pads have low capacity but very high efficiency. As such, total amounts of needed absorbent will depend on the amounts of oil encountered at each site and must be replaced when absorbency limits are reached. Absorbent boom is intended for use in areas too small or sensitive for other skimmers. Absorbent types actually applied will be tailored to parochial conditions.

Jack Up Barges

Governor Jindal said coastal plans for worst-case scenarios also call for jack up barges to be stationed across the coast and serve as mobile field bases. He said 20 barges are capable of transporting materials necessary for the incident, as well as providing food and shelter for the oil spill and shoreline clean up teams and first aid as necessary. These barges can be deployed as conditions change and areas of critical need shift.

The Governor said, %It is also important to point out that just like with the booming, we have leaned forward in our requests of jack up%u2019 barges by requesting 30, because once we have an initial 20 in place we expect to need to establish secondary and third lines of defenses as the oil shifts that will require additional resources in areas further in the coast.

Training

Governor Jindal also spoke about the requests for training fisherman and other coastal responders in boom deployment and monitoring, oil collection protocols, and active containment strategies.

The Governor said plans call for Coast Guard trainers to be prepared to train workers in Chalmette, Belle Chasse, Slidell, Houma, Golden Meadow, Morgan City, Abbeville, and Lake Charles.

%u201CIt is very important that the some of the training begin now so we do not have a shortage of manpower should the oil spill begin to move more quickly to our coast, the well condition deteriorates, or the oil unpredictably shifts toward another area,Governor Jindal said.

Training needs to begin now because we need to ensure we have folks already standing by and prepared to implement the plans if the emergency supervisory training.

Our request for training also includes financial management training under the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 so parishes can learn the relevant regulatory and legal guidelines for their response efforts.

Plan Specifics

The Governor also outlined some of the initial plans for East of the Mississippi River - including all of Plaquemines Parish.

The CPRA and parish emergency managers identified 82 closure points east of the Mississippi River and on the west bank of Plaquemines Parish. This would include booming an area of nearly 45,000 feet with over 200,000 feet of hard boom - due to multiple layers - and over 50,000 feet of secondary and tertiary removal measures.

Governor Jindal said, In talking to St. Tammany Parish President just today, they indicated that their supplemental plan will likely request another 41,000 feet of hard boom for St. Tammany, in addition to their original plan for 11,000 feet of boom. St. Bernard Parish President just today asked for another 165,000 feet of boom that will be included in their supplemental plan, in addition to the 74,000 feet he already requested. This means we anticipate needing another 206,000 feet of boom to secure the East side of the River in these parishes being primarily impacted.%u201D

The plan for east of the Mississippi River calls for the deployment of 29 teams from 12 shore bases and staging areas and seven mobile deployment sites. These mobile sites will consist of lift boats or jack up barges that will be converted to active spill fighting platforms when oil seeps through these initial lines of defense.

This eastern coastal worst-case scenario plan is estimated to cost $107.7 million for the initial 30-day period. The Governor is asking BP to fund these efforts and the Coast Guard to approve them.

The primary worst-case scenario plan for the West Side of the Mississippi River - excluding Plaquemines Parish includes 122 closure points with a width of nearly 92,000 feet protected by over 400,000 feet of boom. In addition, over 100,000 feet of successive lines of defense and other removal measures are included in the plan.

The worst-case scenario plan includes five training sites from Houma to Lake Charles. The plan calls for the deployment of 42 teams west of the river operating from 19 onshore sites and 13 mobile offshore deployment sites. Again, these offshore sites would be mobilized and converted to active oil removal efforts should oil overcome initial containment measures.

The western coastal worst-case scenario plan is estimated to cost more than $177.8 million for the initial 30-day period. The Governor is asking BP to fund these efforts and the Coast Guard to approve them.

Fishermen Assistance Program

The Governor also said today that the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is working in partnership with LED to develop a Fishermen Assistance Plan. This plan calls on BP to address three important components, including:

Immediate assistance to fishermen unable to work due to the oil spill and closure of fishing areas.
Integrating fishermen into the Vessel of Opportunity program to provide them with alternative work opportunities.

Restoring fishery habitat and fisheries stock adversely impacted by the spill to get them back to work as quickly as possible.

The Department is requesting that BP fund this initiative to support our fishing industry, which is being directly impacted by the spill.

National Guard Update

The National Guard has completed hazardous material training and protective equipment training for their direct responders to ensure that each is prepared to safely operate in areas that may be contaminated with oil.

Due to rising waters and high winds, flood waters threatened to over-top the levees in four locations. The National Guard worked with Plaquemines Parish responders to place over one mile of sandbags that ultimately prevented flooding of Highway 23 yesterday.

In St. Bernard Parish, the Louisiana National Guard is supporting parish officials at Breton Sound Marina and Campo Marina. Guardsmen are staging boom materials and accounting for vessels emplacing boom. Yesterday, Guardsmen loaded over 11,000 feet of boom material.

In addition to the National Guard%u2019s liaison teams located in Jefferson, Orleans, St. Bernard, and Plaquemines Parishes, they deployed Liaison teams to St. Tammany Parish.

Thus far, LANG has deployed the following equipment to support response operations:

Over 125 All Terrain Vehicles

Over 55 Boats

Over 140 pieces of Engineer Equipment
Over 40 Transport Vehicles

LDWF Update

Today, the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries trained 80 inmates from the Elayn Hunt Correctional Center who will assist in the cleaning of oil-impacted wildlife recovered from coastal areas. The inmates, who are cleared for community service duty by the Department of Corrections, were provided short course training to handle support duty for professional wildlife rescue personnel.

Tri-State Bird Rescue and Research, Inc. provided the short course training. The inmate trainees will be staged to work in two 40-man shifts, beginning tomorrow. LDWF's Coastal & Nongame Division has 50 people who are helping with boom deployment and are on standby to help with wildlife injury reports.

Wildlife announced today that the special shrimp season in the remaining portion of Zone 1 and all of Zone 2 will close tomorrow at 6 p.m. Last week, LDWF announced a special shrimp season in these waters due to potential effects from the oil spill.

Governor Jindal said, It's important to note that tomorrow's closure is not a result of oil spill. Instead, LDWF biologists collected data that indicates the marketable white shrimp have been harvested and the juvenile brown shrimp remain. In an effort to preserve the smaller brown shrimp, the season has been closed.

LDWF's enforcement division established a mobile forward command at the Breton Sound Marina in Hopedale this morning to monitor the clean up efforts, patrol the closure areas and to respond to any possible search and rescue missions. They have 95 agents and 50 boats dedicated to this mission.

Louisiana Workforce Commission Update

The Louisiana Workforce Commission has mobile units in operation in Plaquemines and St. Bernard parishes today. The mobile units are on hand to handle unemployment claims in connection with oil spill as well as process applications from people seeking oil spill clean-up job opportunities.

LSP Update

Louisiana State Police Emergency Services (HazMat) have been deployed to coastal areas for shoreline assessments and close monitoring of Louisiana coastal regions. Hazmat Troopers are also working closely with local emergency representatives to develop a proactive plan of action in response the oil impacting the coast.

Additionally, LSP Troop B based in Metairie, has Troopers serving as liaison officers to the St. Bernard and Plaquemines Parish Offices of Emergency Preparedness as well as at the Shell Beach staging area to ensure logistical and operational needs are met.

DOTD Update

The Governor also announced today that DOTD has opened the Ostrica Locks in Plaquemines Parish to help divert the oil from entering coastal areas.



Office of the Governor http://www.gov.louisiana.gov/index.cfm?m d=newsroom&tmp=detail&articleID= 2147
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 415 Comments: 125736
Quoting Grothar:


Cruel! but very funny!


You said it! :D LOL!
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Quoting Grothar:
CycloneOZ

The scary thing about your story is that I believe it is all true! I have led a very adventurous life, not of my own choosing. Those on here who actually know me, know that I am kind of a tough guy, but not at all daring. I must be lacking that particular gene. However, I can't say that I do not enjoy that trait in others. You keep the rest of us entertained. Just, please be careful.


I'll be as careful as I can. I promise.

But no guarantees...
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.