Flooding from record rains kills 11 in Tennessee; oil spill update

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 1:52 PM GMT on May 03, 2010

Share this Blog
1
+

Nashville, Tennessee remains virtually paralyzed this morning thanks to that city's heaviest recorded 1-day and 2-day rainfall in its history. A remarkable 7.25" of rain fell on the city Sunday, breaking the record for most rain in a single day (previously 6.60", set September 13, 1979.) Nashville's third greatest day of rainfall on record occurred Saturday, when 6.32" fell. Nashville also eclipsed its greatest 6-hour and 12-hour rainfall events on record, with 5.57" and 7.20", respectively, falling on Sunday. And, remarkably, only 2 days into the month, May 2010 is already the wettest May on record for Nashville.

Rainfall records were smashed all across Tennessee and Kentucky, with amounts as high as 17.73" recorded at Camden, TN, and 17.02" at Brownsville, TN. According to Chris Burt, the author of the excellent book Extreme Weather, the 13.30" that fell on Camden in 24 hours just missed eclipsing the state's all-time 24-hour precipitation record, the 13.60" inches that fell on Milan on September 13, 1982. Jackson, Tennessee had its rainiest day in its 63-year weather history on Sunday, 7.93". Bowling Green, Kentucky had its heaviest 2-day precipitation event on record, 9.67". Records in Bowling Green go back to 1870. The University of Wisconsin GOES Satellite Blog has some excellent imagery showing the remarkable plume of tropical moisture that crossed over Central America from the Eastern Pacific and fed the record rains.


Figure 1. Radar estimated rainfall for May 1 - 2, 2010 from the Nashville, Tennessee radar. A large region of the Tennessee and Kentucky received over ten inches of rain, with many areas receiving more than fifteen inches.


Figure 2. Flood forecast for the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. Image credit: NOAA.

The record rains triggered massive flooding that has killed at least eleven people in Tennessee, with two missing. The Cumberland River in downtown Nashville has surged to a height of 51', which is 11' over flood height, and the highest level the river has reached since a flood control project was completed in the early 1960s. The river is expected to crest this afternoon at 11.5' above flood stage, bringing flood waters to a large portion of the downtown area. The mayor has ordered all schools, parks, and libraries closed today, and commuter bus and train services have also been suspended. Five people died in Nashville due to the flooding. The Harpeth River at Bellevue, Tennessee to its greatest flood height since record keeping began in 1921. The river had a depth of 2 feet early Saturday morning before the rains began, and was running at a depth of 29' early this morning, breaking the record of 24.34' set in 1948. (To check out the flood heights, use our wundermap for Nashville with the "USGS River" layer turned on.) The Duck River at Hurricane Mills reached 28.7' yesterday morning before its streamgage stopped operating, its 2nd greatest flood height since record keeping began in 1926 (record: 30.7' in 1948.)

The record rains were accompanied by a surge of very warm air that set record high temperature marks at 21 major airports across the Eastern U.S. on Saturday; 19 more records were set on Sunday. This is not surprising, since more moisture can evaporate into warmer air, making record-setting rainfall events more likely when record high temperatures are present.


Figure 3. A portable classroom building from a nearby high school floats past submerged cars on I-24 near Nashville, TN on May 1, 2010. One person died in the flooding in this region of I-24. Roughly 200 - 250 vehicles got submerged on this section of I-24, according to wunderphotographer laughingjester, who was a tow truck operator called in to clear out the stranded vehicles.

Funding issues to take 17 Tennessee streamgages offline
According to the USGS web site, seventeen Tennessee streamflow gages with records going back up to 85 years will stop collecting data on July 1 because of budget cuts. With up to thirteen people in Tennessee dying from flooding this weekend, now hardly seems to be the time to be skimping on monitoring river flow levels by taking 17 of Tennessee's 94 streamflow gages out of service. These gages are critical for proper issuance of flood warnings to people in harm's way. Furthermore, Tennessee and most of the northern 2/3 of the U.S. can expect a much higher incidence of record flooding in coming decades. This will be driven by two factors: increased urban development causing faster run-off, and an increase in very heavy precipitation events due to global warming. Both factors have already contributed to significant increases in flooding events in recent decades over much of the U.S. According the landmark 2009 U.S. Climate Impact Report from the U.S. Global Change Research Program, "the amount of rain falling in the heaviest downpours has increased approximately 20 percent on average in the past century, and this trend is very likely to continue, with the largest increases in the wettest places." The USGS web site advertises that users who can contribute funding for the non-Federal share of costs to continue operation of these streamgages should contact Shannon Williams of the USGS Tennessee Water Science Center at 615-837-4755 or swilliam@usgs.gov. Tennessee is not the only state with streamgages at risk of closing down; fully 276 gages in 37 states have been shut down or will be shut down later this year (Figure 4.)


Figure 4. Streamgages that have been discontinued or are being considered for discontinuation or for conversion from continuous record discharge to stage-only stations. Funds for these 276 threatened streamgages are from the U.S. Geological Survey and other Federal, State, Tribal, and local agencies. For those streamgages that have already been discontinued, extensive efforts were made to find another funding source; however, when no funding was made available the streamgages had to be discontinued. For those streamgages at risk for discontinuation, the current funding source has indicated that it can no longer fund the streamgage. Efforts are currently underway to identify another funding source for the operation of these streamgages; however, if no funding is identified, then these streamgages will have to be discontinued also. If you have questions about specific streamgages, click on the state of concern on the USGS web page of threatened stream gages.

Oil spill update
The oil slick from the April 20 explosion and blowout of the offshore oil rig Deepwater Horizon has retreated from the coast, thanks to a slackening of the persistent onshore winds that have affected the northern Gulf of Mexico over the past week. Onshore winds of 10 - 15 knots will continue today, according to the latest NWS marine forecast, then shift to sideshore (out of the west) on Tuesday, as a cold front passes. Winds will then resume a weak onshore flow at 5 - 10 knots, Wednesday through Friday. These winds should cause only a slow transport of the oil slick towards the coast. I don't expect the spill will affect any land areas for the remainder of the week, with the possible exception of the mouth of the Mississippi River in Louisiana and the Chandeleur Islands. The latest forecast of Gulf currents from the NOAA HYCOM model (see also this alternative view of the HYCOM ocean current forecast) show weak ocean currents affecting the region during the remainder of the week. These currents will not be strong enough to push any oil southwards into the Loop Current over the next five days, so the Keys and South Florida are safe from oil for now.


Figure 5. Previous location and forecast location for tomorrow of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Image credit: NOAA Office of Response and Restoration. See also the trajectory maps available at State of Louisiana web site.

Jeff Masters

Flooding on I-24 (XMLP)
Flooding on I-24
Lick Creek Bridge (Wingman100)
God is cleaning out the creek and I think making a statement about cleanliness
Lick Creek Bridge
Removing the flood damaged cars and trucks. (laughingjester)
I am a wrecker driver for Martin's wrecker service. We were called to remove the vehicles that got caught in the flooding on interstate I 24 westbound near the Bell Road exit in Nashville Tennessee. Of course this is after the waters had subsided. It was roughly 200, 250 cars and trucks that got caught up in the flood. The debris to left is actually the remnants of a portable classroom that floated alongside the interstate and eventually rolled over and disintegrated.
Removing the flood damaged cars and trucks.

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 710 - 660

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15Blog Index

710. hurricanejunky
2:41 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
new blog!
Member Since: August 28, 2006 Posts: 6 Comments: 2895
709. CycloneOz
2:40 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting TexasGulf:
Oz:

You could always hire yourself out as hurricane window protection. You've already passed the wind-driven 2x4 test.

Some businesses would pay good money to have you stand in front of their plate glass window as a goalie... blocking any flying debris.

Of course, you don't get paid if nature scores a goal!


LOL! When those boards came at me, I was able to deflect many with my arms which had lacrosse arm guards on them.

It's like you were there to see me getting whacked! :)
Member Since: August 26, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 3616
708. AussieStorm
2:39 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting alexhurricane1991:
Good evening aussiestorm.

Good evening, How is life in your part of the world?
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15892
707. TexasGulf
2:38 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Oz:

You could always hire yourself out as hurricane window protection. You've already passed the wind-driven 2x4 test.

Some businesses would pay good money to have you stand in front of their plate glass window as a goalie... blocking any flying debris.

Of course, you don't get paid if nature scores a goal!
Member Since: April 28, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 354
706. alexhurricane1991
2:37 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Good evening aussiestorm.
Member Since: April 8, 2010 Posts: 15 Comments: 2570
705. CycloneOz
2:36 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
I heard many good comments about our live web cam during the tornado chase two weeks ago.

From the feedback I got, the picture was great, the audio was so-so...and the platform was stable as long as we had a solid wireless broadband connection.

So this bodes well for you guys here when it's time to go outside to witness a hurricane landfall.
Member Since: August 26, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 3616
704. AussieStorm
2:35 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting Tropicsweatherpr:
Good Evening AussieStorm and good morning to the rest from a rather wet Puerto Rico. The Aussies are down to 0.5 the same as Climate Prediction Center.

Quoting wunderkidcayman:
Good morning all

Quoting msgambler:
Morning Ike, Aqua, and all others. Beautiful here in Mobile. A little humid, but other than that it is rather nice outside.


Evening all.
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15892
703. CycloneOz
2:33 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting StormChaser81:


You'll will find out if the signal can make it up and out with the violent clouds, rain, winds interfering.


Hurricane Ivan...wireless service was available from beginning to end without interruption.

But that was in Pensacola, FL.

Everything is nicer and more robust in Pensacola, anyway...so no surprise there.

And you make sure you have face protection, too. HurricaneGirl would have a fit should something mess up that good looking face of yours! :P
Member Since: August 26, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 3616
702. CyclonicVoyage
2:31 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting CycloneOz:
One thing is for sure.

Should a major category hurricane come ashore this year along the U.S. coastline, you folks are going to have a front row seat in the violent eye wall of the storm...

...as long as wireless broadband service stays up.


Sprint has carried me through 3 of 4 storms without interruption. Had ATT for the first one and was out for a week.
Member Since: January 30, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 3259
701. StormChaser81
2:23 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting CycloneOz:
One thing is for sure.

Should a major category hurricane come ashore this year along the U.S. coastline, you folks are going to have a front row seat in the violent eye wall of the storm...

...as long as wireless broadband service stays up.


You'll will find out if the signal can make it up and out with the violent clouds, rain, winds interfering.
Member Since: August 11, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2315
700. CycloneOz
2:20 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
One thing is for sure.

Should a major category hurricane come ashore this year along the U.S. coastline, you folks are going to have a front row seat in the violent eye wall of the storm...

...as long as wireless broadband service stays up.
Member Since: August 26, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 3616
699. TropicTraveler
2:13 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting pottery:
Good Morning.
Fantastic morning here. Birds are singing, 2 squirrels are squabbling in a mango tree, a Toucan is sitting in a Pink Poui tree and calling out for whatever they call out for, and the Sun is already Hot, at 7:16 am.
If it does not start to rain soon, the leaves on my Calabash tree are going to fall off again??


Pottery you are just being cruel now!
Member Since: July 24, 2007 Posts: 2 Comments: 924
698. CyclonicVoyage
2:12 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting StormChaser81:


Tornado's are much more scarier than hurricanes.

Tornado's come on very fast and powerful, hurricanes slowly start to go down hill.

Once your in the path of a tornado its time to hide.

Hurricane leaves you time to escape.



Generally speaking, yes they do. However, Max Mayfield's comment still sticks in my head, darnit. "I fear one day that folks are going to go to bed to a Tropical Storm and wake up to a major hurricane on their door step.
Member Since: January 30, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 3259
697. TropicTraveler
2:09 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Storm Chaser 81 - tornadoes are an integral part of the hurricanes I've been through. They spin up in the outer bands and do much damage even if you aren't in the heart of the storm. I've seen the disaster caused by both. I wouldn't get into a contest on which is worse. They both take lives, destroy homes, businesses and jobs, change people's lives forever, and eliminate neighborhoods and social networks that sustain elderly people and allow them to live independently. No matter how you look at it, there's no good side to either. I'm dreading this year which is already bad and looks to get worse.
Member Since: July 24, 2007 Posts: 2 Comments: 924
696. MahFL
1:55 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Mmmm Helen Hunt in a wet shirt...mmmm
Member Since: June 9, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 3179
695. CycloneOz
1:55 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting homelesswanderer:


Well 99.9% of the time. ;) But I know what you mean. A tornado would be much more terrifying springing up literally out of the blue a lot of times. Closest I ever got was a funnel cloud not quite touching down. It picked up an oak tree and sat it on the neighbors house. We went to check on him in the pitch black. He didnt open the door. Said he'd get the tree off in the morning. Lol. Some people are hard to impress.


Big three concerns being outside in a major category hurricane:

1) Glass
2) Metal
3) Tornado and/or a mesovortex

There's no doubt about it. What we're wanting to do is extremely dangerous and high risk.
Member Since: August 26, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 3616
694. CycloneOz
1:52 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting hurricanejunky:
Seriously, I bought a used police riot helmet with a flip down plexi face shield. I thought that was sufficient.


Flip down plexi shield may be enough...

We'll find out.

I'm trying something else entirely. And I'm sure the other guys on the team will have their own configurations, too.

May the best design win, huh? :P
Member Since: August 26, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 3616
693. homelesswanderer
1:51 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting StormChaser81:


Tornado's are much more scarier than hurricanes.

Tornado's come on very fast and powerful, hurricanes slowly start to go down hill.

Once your in the path of a tornado its time to hide.

Hurricane leaves you time to escape.em>


Well 99.9% of the time. ;) But I know what you mean. A tornado would be much more terrifying springing up literally out of the blue a lot of times. Closest I ever got was a funnel cloud not quite touching down. It picked up an oak tree and sat it on the neighbors house. We went to check on him in the pitch black. He didnt open the door. Said he'd get the tree off in the morning. Lol. Some people are hard to impress.
Member Since: August 15, 2008 Posts: 10 Comments: 3665
692. CycloneOz
1:51 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting Ossqss:


You need a bigger helmet :)



ROFLMAO!!!!! :D
Member Since: August 26, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 3616
691. hurricanejunky
1:48 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Seriously, I bought a used police riot helmet with a flip down plexi face shield. I thought that was sufficient.
Member Since: August 28, 2006 Posts: 6 Comments: 2895
690. Ossqss
1:44 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting CycloneOz:
Listen HJ!

Make sure your face is protected! Safety glasses and a helmet are not enough!


You need a bigger helmet :)

Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8185
689. hurricanejunky
1:44 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting CycloneOz:
Listen HJ!

Make sure your face is protected! Safety glasses and a helmet are not enough!


I hear you...what else would you suggest? A hockey mask?
Member Since: August 28, 2006 Posts: 6 Comments: 2895
688. alexhurricane1991
1:40 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Good morning its 77 degrees here in odessa at 9:40 am
Member Since: April 8, 2010 Posts: 15 Comments: 2570
687. CycloneOz
1:40 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Listen HJ!

Make sure your face is protected! Safety glasses and a helmet are not enough!
Member Since: August 26, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 3616
686. CycloneOz
1:39 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting hurricanejunky:


You are sometimes the dumbest smart guy I know. Please don't kill yourself before the chasing season begins dude! I would hate to miss out on the debates we're sure to engage in this season over margaritas.


I am the dumbest smart guy you know! :D
Member Since: August 26, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 3616
685. CycloneOz
1:38 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting hurricanejunky:


Unless you run into a nice shed with some sturdy well pipes and you can cinch yourself and Helen Hunt to it so you can get some good footage INSIDE the funnel! Oh wait...that's only in Twister. Disregard.


Thank goodness I'm on a team! I'll derive a lot of motivation from you guys! :)
Member Since: August 26, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 3616
684. hurricanejunky
1:37 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting CycloneOz:


Coulda used any of your suits on Saturday when I took a 2 X 4 flung from a football throwing machine just underneath my safety glasses.

Testing my suit = high risk.
Not testing my suit before Cat 5 = just stupid.

Still, I got a black eye and the area is still real sore.

I am working this week on providing more facial protection in my suit.


You are sometimes the dumbest smart guy I know. Please don't kill yourself before the chasing season begins dude! I would hate to miss out on the debates we're sure to engage in this season over margaritas.
Member Since: August 28, 2006 Posts: 6 Comments: 2895
683. hurricanejunky
1:35 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting StormChaser81:


Tornado's are much more scarier than hurricanes.

Tornado's come on very fast and powerful, hurricanes slowly start to go down hill.

Once your in the path of a tornado its time to hide.

Hurricane leaves you time to escape.


Unless you run into a nice shed with some sturdy well pipes and you can cinch yourself and Helen Hunt to it so you can get some good footage INSIDE the funnel! Oh wait...that's only in Twister. Disregard.
Member Since: August 28, 2006 Posts: 6 Comments: 2895
682. CycloneOz
1:30 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:


o come on oz its gonna be 5 or 10 years, before we see another season like the approaching season thats coming
this is the season to intercept yer cat 5
mom nature gonna spin up a few nice ones
your not gonna let a little tornado and a piece of 2by4 to the face scare ya off are ya


No...you're right. What's a close call with a killer tornado and a sore orbital socket compared to intercepting that big, bad Cat 5 this year?
Member Since: August 26, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 3616
681. PcolaDan
1:16 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
i am expecting to see a collapse soon in that area where the water cometh from then finally a lava flow to follow afterwards been a lot of changes in that area over last week


I agree. We have been watching the slow approach of the steam, and yesterday there were about 5 earthquakes in the area, highest about 2.9. Lots of activity. There is a good video here that shows it up close. It's in Icelandic, but good shots.
Member Since: August 22, 2008 Posts: 12 Comments: 6010
680. Eagle101
1:15 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Morning Everyone...

Rain has started here in PC. Hoping we do not see anywhere near the doppler reported rainfall seen in Walton County yesterday. Will report total 24 hour rainfall here tomorrow. In approximatley 30 minutes, I already have .9 inches...uh oh...

On another note, I see BP tried to pull a fast one on the poor fishermen. How terribly low that a corporation as big as BP would try something like that...I can hear them now..."we were just looking out for our stock holders..." I am sure you were. I saw a report on one of the cable networks that showed a reporter reading the contract to one of the local fishermen...because he could not read. I felt so bad for him. This is the only life these guys know. Shame on BP for even trying this.

Everyone take care.

Very Respectfully,

Jon
Member Since: January 7, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 40
679. severstorm
1:13 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Ok people gots to go and great to be back on here and chat with my friends
Member Since: November 25, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 956
678. severstorm
1:12 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting Jeff9641:


Been Great!! Busy of course but that is a good thing! How was the race?

Let me tell you the race was the best i have ever seen. Had rain before and rain after but no rain that sunday and got 2 races for one price.
Member Since: November 25, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 956
677. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
1:11 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting PcolaDan:
Eyjafjallajökull volcano looking beautiful this morning.

i am expecting to see a collapse soon in that area where the water cometh from then finally a lava flow to follow afterwards been a lot of changes in that area over last week
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 168 Comments: 53285
676. IKE
1:07 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting StormW:


IKE, good article, thanks!


You're welcome:)
Member Since: June 9, 2005 Posts: 23 Comments: 37858
674. PcolaDan
1:02 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Eyjafjallajökull volcano looking beautiful this morning.

Member Since: August 22, 2008 Posts: 12 Comments: 6010
673. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
1:02 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting CycloneOz:
re Post 612 and 659:

That bloomberg report is why I'm testing my hurricane suit with me in it.

If a major category storm makes landfall, it's pretty much guaranteed that I'm going to get whacked by lumber and probably a bunch of other stuff, too.

I'll know this weekend if my new configuration for better face protection works.

Still, my biggest debris fears are glass and metal.

After chasing down that Mississippi tornado two weeks ago, I'm finding that my passion for doing this sort of thing is beginning to wane.



o come on oz its gonna be 5 or 10 years, before we see another season like the approaching season thats coming
this is the season to intercept yer cat 5
mom nature gonna spin up a few nice ones
your not gonna let a little tornado and a piece of 2by4 to the face scare ya off are ya
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 168 Comments: 53285
668. severstorm
12:52 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting Jeff9641:


Yeah, there were several individuals on this blog that thought the water temps around FL wouldn't rise this fast! I guess they didn't think we would be hitting 93 to 97 come the first of May. That 97 happened Sunday to my NW at Ocala I've getting hitting 92 to 94 at house sice Saturday.

Morning jeff, Yes the upper 60"s are good in the morning. I have been in the 93-97 range since sunday for highs. How you been?
Member Since: November 25, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 956
667. StormChaser81
12:51 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting CycloneOz:


Yeah...you're right. What was I thinking? :P


Tornado's are much more scarier than hurricanes.

Tornado's come on very fast and powerful, hurricanes slowly start to go down hill.

Once your in the path of a tornado its time to hide.

Hurricane leaves you time to escape.
Member Since: August 11, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2315
664. CycloneOz
12:44 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting StormChaser81:


Until you see a hurricane form, then it will come back. =)


Yeah...you're right. What was I thinking? :P
Member Since: August 26, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 3616
663. StormChaser81
12:42 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Quoting CycloneOz:
re Post 612 and 659:

That bloomberg report is why I'm testing my hurricane suit with me in it.

If a major category storm makes landfall, it's pretty much guaranteed that I'm going to get whacked by lumber and probably a bunch of other stuff, too.

I'll know this weekend if my new configuration for better face protection works.

Still, my biggest debris fears are glass and metal.

After chasing down that Mississippi tornado two weeks ago, I'm finding that my passion for doing this sort of thing is beginning to wane.



Until you see a hurricane form, then it will come back. =)
Member Since: August 11, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2315
662. ftpiercecane
12:39 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Water temp off of Fort pirce inlet went from 73 to 75 in 24 hours.
Member Since: October 9, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 204
661. CycloneOz
12:33 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
re Post 612 and 659:

That bloomberg report is why I'm testing my hurricane suit with me in it.

If a major category storm makes landfall, it's pretty much guaranteed that I'm going to get whacked by lumber and probably a bunch of other stuff, too.

I'll know this weekend if my new configuration for better face protection works.

Still, my biggest debris fears are glass and metal.

After chasing down that Mississippi tornado two weeks ago, I'm finding that my passion for doing this sort of thing is beginning to wane.

Member Since: August 26, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 3616
660. wunderkidcayman
12:20 PM GMT on May 04, 2010
Good morning all
Member Since: June 13, 2009 Posts: 2 Comments: 10852

Viewing: 710 - 660

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.