Flooding from record rains kills 11 in Tennessee; oil spill update

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 1:52 PM GMT on May 03, 2010

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Nashville, Tennessee remains virtually paralyzed this morning thanks to that city's heaviest recorded 1-day and 2-day rainfall in its history. A remarkable 7.25" of rain fell on the city Sunday, breaking the record for most rain in a single day (previously 6.60", set September 13, 1979.) Nashville's third greatest day of rainfall on record occurred Saturday, when 6.32" fell. Nashville also eclipsed its greatest 6-hour and 12-hour rainfall events on record, with 5.57" and 7.20", respectively, falling on Sunday. And, remarkably, only 2 days into the month, May 2010 is already the wettest May on record for Nashville.

Rainfall records were smashed all across Tennessee and Kentucky, with amounts as high as 17.73" recorded at Camden, TN, and 17.02" at Brownsville, TN. According to Chris Burt, the author of the excellent book Extreme Weather, the 13.30" that fell on Camden in 24 hours just missed eclipsing the state's all-time 24-hour precipitation record, the 13.60" inches that fell on Milan on September 13, 1982. Jackson, Tennessee had its rainiest day in its 63-year weather history on Sunday, 7.93". Bowling Green, Kentucky had its heaviest 2-day precipitation event on record, 9.67". Records in Bowling Green go back to 1870. The University of Wisconsin GOES Satellite Blog has some excellent imagery showing the remarkable plume of tropical moisture that crossed over Central America from the Eastern Pacific and fed the record rains.


Figure 1. Radar estimated rainfall for May 1 - 2, 2010 from the Nashville, Tennessee radar. A large region of the Tennessee and Kentucky received over ten inches of rain, with many areas receiving more than fifteen inches.


Figure 2. Flood forecast for the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. Image credit: NOAA.

The record rains triggered massive flooding that has killed at least eleven people in Tennessee, with two missing. The Cumberland River in downtown Nashville has surged to a height of 51', which is 11' over flood height, and the highest level the river has reached since a flood control project was completed in the early 1960s. The river is expected to crest this afternoon at 11.5' above flood stage, bringing flood waters to a large portion of the downtown area. The mayor has ordered all schools, parks, and libraries closed today, and commuter bus and train services have also been suspended. Five people died in Nashville due to the flooding. The Harpeth River at Bellevue, Tennessee to its greatest flood height since record keeping began in 1921. The river had a depth of 2 feet early Saturday morning before the rains began, and was running at a depth of 29' early this morning, breaking the record of 24.34' set in 1948. (To check out the flood heights, use our wundermap for Nashville with the "USGS River" layer turned on.) The Duck River at Hurricane Mills reached 28.7' yesterday morning before its streamgage stopped operating, its 2nd greatest flood height since record keeping began in 1926 (record: 30.7' in 1948.)

The record rains were accompanied by a surge of very warm air that set record high temperature marks at 21 major airports across the Eastern U.S. on Saturday; 19 more records were set on Sunday. This is not surprising, since more moisture can evaporate into warmer air, making record-setting rainfall events more likely when record high temperatures are present.


Figure 3. A portable classroom building from a nearby high school floats past submerged cars on I-24 near Nashville, TN on May 1, 2010. One person died in the flooding in this region of I-24. Roughly 200 - 250 vehicles got submerged on this section of I-24, according to wunderphotographer laughingjester, who was a tow truck operator called in to clear out the stranded vehicles.

Funding issues to take 17 Tennessee streamgages offline
According to the USGS web site, seventeen Tennessee streamflow gages with records going back up to 85 years will stop collecting data on July 1 because of budget cuts. With up to thirteen people in Tennessee dying from flooding this weekend, now hardly seems to be the time to be skimping on monitoring river flow levels by taking 17 of Tennessee's 94 streamflow gages out of service. These gages are critical for proper issuance of flood warnings to people in harm's way. Furthermore, Tennessee and most of the northern 2/3 of the U.S. can expect a much higher incidence of record flooding in coming decades. This will be driven by two factors: increased urban development causing faster run-off, and an increase in very heavy precipitation events due to global warming. Both factors have already contributed to significant increases in flooding events in recent decades over much of the U.S. According the landmark 2009 U.S. Climate Impact Report from the U.S. Global Change Research Program, "the amount of rain falling in the heaviest downpours has increased approximately 20 percent on average in the past century, and this trend is very likely to continue, with the largest increases in the wettest places." The USGS web site advertises that users who can contribute funding for the non-Federal share of costs to continue operation of these streamgages should contact Shannon Williams of the USGS Tennessee Water Science Center at 615-837-4755 or swilliam@usgs.gov. Tennessee is not the only state with streamgages at risk of closing down; fully 276 gages in 37 states have been shut down or will be shut down later this year (Figure 4.)


Figure 4. Streamgages that have been discontinued or are being considered for discontinuation or for conversion from continuous record discharge to stage-only stations. Funds for these 276 threatened streamgages are from the U.S. Geological Survey and other Federal, State, Tribal, and local agencies. For those streamgages that have already been discontinued, extensive efforts were made to find another funding source; however, when no funding was made available the streamgages had to be discontinued. For those streamgages at risk for discontinuation, the current funding source has indicated that it can no longer fund the streamgage. Efforts are currently underway to identify another funding source for the operation of these streamgages; however, if no funding is identified, then these streamgages will have to be discontinued also. If you have questions about specific streamgages, click on the state of concern on the USGS web page of threatened stream gages.

Oil spill update
The oil slick from the April 20 explosion and blowout of the offshore oil rig Deepwater Horizon has retreated from the coast, thanks to a slackening of the persistent onshore winds that have affected the northern Gulf of Mexico over the past week. Onshore winds of 10 - 15 knots will continue today, according to the latest NWS marine forecast, then shift to sideshore (out of the west) on Tuesday, as a cold front passes. Winds will then resume a weak onshore flow at 5 - 10 knots, Wednesday through Friday. These winds should cause only a slow transport of the oil slick towards the coast. I don't expect the spill will affect any land areas for the remainder of the week, with the possible exception of the mouth of the Mississippi River in Louisiana and the Chandeleur Islands. The latest forecast of Gulf currents from the NOAA HYCOM model (see also this alternative view of the HYCOM ocean current forecast) show weak ocean currents affecting the region during the remainder of the week. These currents will not be strong enough to push any oil southwards into the Loop Current over the next five days, so the Keys and South Florida are safe from oil for now.


Figure 5. Previous location and forecast location for tomorrow of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Image credit: NOAA Office of Response and Restoration. See also the trajectory maps available at State of Louisiana web site.

Jeff Masters

Flooding on I-24 (XMLP)
Flooding on I-24
Lick Creek Bridge (Wingman100)
God is cleaning out the creek and I think making a statement about cleanliness
Lick Creek Bridge
Removing the flood damaged cars and trucks. (laughingjester)
I am a wrecker driver for Martin's wrecker service. We were called to remove the vehicles that got caught in the flooding on interstate I 24 westbound near the Bell Road exit in Nashville Tennessee. Of course this is after the waters had subsided. It was roughly 200, 250 cars and trucks that got caught up in the flood. The debris to left is actually the remnants of a portable classroom that floated alongside the interstate and eventually rolled over and disintegrated.
Removing the flood damaged cars and trucks.

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Oh, and i forgot to mention the economy. that's a big one too. that's definitely one the history books too.

and the floods in tennessee
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Quoting TexasGulf:


By all logic... 20 Million BPD (or 840 Million gallons / day) divided by 300 Million U.S. citizens... we each use on average 2.8 gallons of oil per day. That goes into fuel, electricity, tires, plastics, transport of goods, public services, road surfaces, roofing shingles, glues and adhesives, food packaging... you name it.

Try to get through ONE single day without touching or using anything made from oil. Betcha can't.

Solar and Wind each alone can create enough electricity for the entire wolrd.

Japanese Researchers Make Plastic Out of Water
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Quoting truecajun:
You know, I'm starting to wonder. Are all of these disasters "normal". I'm not trying to start a political discussion, I'm just wondering if anyone else is beginning to question whether or not someone above is not happy with us. We had crazy hurricane seasons, Haiti quake, Chile quake, Iceland volcano, the spill, terrorist attacks, and the Napa quake is bound to trigger something more in the near future.

ORRRRR, does this stuff happen every generation and every generation wonders the same thing I'm wondering, but really it's all just a cycle?

Again, I'm JUST WONDERING.


I'm finding the Mayan 2012 world's end scenario more plausible with each passing week!
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You know, I'm starting to wonder. Are all of these disasters "normal". I'm not trying to start a political discussion, I'm just wondering if anyone else is beginning to question whether or not someone above is not happy with us. We had crazy hurricane seasons, Haiti quake, Chile quake, Iceland volcano, the spill, terrorist attacks, and the Napa quake is bound to trigger something more in the near future.

ORRRRR, does this stuff happen every generation and every generation wonders the same thing I'm wondering, but really it's all just a cycle?

Again, I'm JUST WONDERING.
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Quoting Ossqss:
Oz, I am still working on the hurricane suit for you. With this one, at least we can recycle you. LoL, J/K :)



Coulda used any of your suits on Saturday when I took a 2 X 4 flung from a football throwing machine just underneath my safety glasses.

Testing my suit = high risk.
Not testing my suit before Cat 5 = just stupid.

Still, I got a black eye and the area is still real sore.

I am working this week on providing more facial protection in my suit.
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Quoting tomas5tex:


Oil prices, thus gas prices, go up and down because of trading on Wall Street. Google Saudi oil.

From the Wall Street Journal

Saudi Arabia said Tuesday that the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries won't let global oil markets get too tight, an indication the world's biggest crude exporter won't be shy about putting more barrels into the market to quell runaway oil prices.

"We will never allow [the oil market to] get to the point where it puts too much pressure on prices," Saudi Arabia Oil Minister Ali Naimi told journalists here ahead of OPEC's Wednesday production policy meeting.

Mr. Naimi's comments came as U.S. oil prices again topped $80 a barrel, above the kingdom's preferred range of $75 to $80 a barrel marked last year by King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia. On the New York Mercantile Exchange Tuesday, light, sweet crude futures for April delivery gained $1.90, or 2.4%, to $81.70 a barrel.

"Mr. Naimi is reminding the market that the kingdom's policy of meeting customers' needs is still in place and any major and sustained divergence from the preferred $70 to $80 price zone can be headed off as and when necessary," said Bill Farren-Price of consultancy Petroleum Policy Intelligence.

And yes it's bad that 11 people died. But it's also bad that hundreds, in not thousands of livelihoods may be lost. How many foreclosures and bankruptcies will there be? How many local economies will damaged beyond repair? And I don't think anyone is saying to not pump oil.

Member Since: August 22, 2008 Posts: 12 Comments: 6010
599. I know that area you speak of...lived on the NW end of Nederland for a few years. One can smell it well when coming back after being away for a while...from highway 69, even.
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U.S. Exports of Oil
Link
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Quoting Tazmanian:
by the way has any one for got in what we had a few years a go today back in 1999
An f-5 tornado near Oklahoma City?
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I lived in Beaumont, Tx... the birthplace of the Texas oil boom and site of the first "gusher".

In the early 1900's, oil was stored in large open (unlined) earthen diked ponds. Oil drenched the marsh land that was Nederland & South Beaumont, Tx. To this day, where spindle-top and "the hill" used to be is about a waist deep swampy mess. If you're unlucky enough to wade into that area, you can still come across areas of gooey black muck and even parts of old wooden oil storage barrels.

Yet, life goes on. Those areas are actually stinking, festering marshlands to this day, full of animal life and mosquitoes. I'm absolutely sure that there were oil spills on the Neches river and around Port Arthur, where much of the oil was pumped onto barges for transport. Yet Port Arthur is home to one of the largest shrimping fleets in North America and there is abundant sea life off the S.E. Texas shore.

I suppose the point I'm making is that spills have happened since the day oil was first discovered. In every single case, nature has overcome the problem and rebounded. In fact, I bet most of the reason for the rebound is because people stopped going to those areas due to the mess, leaving nature to itself.

I wonder about the gulf shrimp, fish and oyster populations this year. Oysters can ingest small quantities of oil and filter it... however people won't be eating the oysters due to the contamination. Shrimpers probably net a hundred million shrimp every season... but this year they won't be shrimping those waters. Sure, oil may kill some shrimp, but many more will survive to breed.

I wonder if we will see an explosion in fish populations in years to come simply because there is a ban on commercial fishing in oil affected areas, and because people will be leery about buying Gulf fish. The lack of fish, shrimp and oyster harvest this year may mean greatly increased populations next year.
Member Since: April 28, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 354
Quoting JRRP:

yeah.. is well below normal


The below normal shear is primarily due to a strong deep-layered high pressure system over the western Atlantic. These type of highs can sometimes be just as bad as shear for tropical cyclones. They cause too much sinking air, or low level divergence.

If a high extends beyond 500mb, it will cause too much capping at the surface and mid levels.




Anticyclones that are near the 200mb levels are perfect tropical cyclone formation. They help the ventilate a tropical cyclone's outflow effectively.
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Quoting Ossqss:
Oz, I am still working on the hurricane suit for you. With this one, at least we can recycle you. LoL, J/K :)



Well not to discriminate but it looks more like a ghillie suit for a garbage dump to me very good if a war happen in a landfill or dump
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ROFL * love it *
Quoting Ossqss:
Oz, I am still working on the hurricane suit for you. With this one, at least we can recycle you. LoL, J/K :)

Member Since: July 10, 2005 Posts: 157 Comments: 29383
Oz, I am still working on the hurricane suit for you. With this one, at least we can recycle you. LoL, J/K :)

Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8185
I don't normally post but it is time to vent...One question, What will the price of gas be in 6 months? 3 dollars a gallon or more...maybe but why will it be that much? It will be because we will have to buy our oil from overseas market,at the price that they want to put on it, not from the oil spill in the gulf.Sure it is a terrible situation and could and probably get worst before it gets better. It seem like so many only care about what is going to happen to the environment. Well if you just Google oil spills you will see that there have been many in history. The environment healed itself and we didn't stop drilling. What about the spills of tears from the families that have lost love one? Those burden will never heal. What about the lives that was lost and the families that was change forever. Have we just forgot about them and the families they left behind. The environment will be fixed in the coming years but the wives who will be waking up alone or the son who will hit his first home run without his dad or the daughter who will not have her father walk her down the aisle.Have everyone forgot about the lost? This spill will but a burden on all of our everyone if we let it. To stop the drilling would be wrong.

There was talk a couple of years ago about a huge find of oil in the Gulf and in Alaska and that it would help boost our economy but there was people that said that it would take years before we would see any measurable impact at the pump. Well let me just say that if we stop all the drilling for oil off our coast and even inland in the areas that is known to have large areas and go looking at boosting our oil intake by buying from the overseas market we will see a huge impact on everyone wallets a lot sooner than later.

I know that this is off topic here and I do apologies but come on people open your eyes to what will happen. This nation is known for overcoming bad times and this is another one that we have to come together and overcome. Let stand beside the freedoms that we still have and to go forth and explore. Let this country support itself and not look for nation to get oil from that would raise the price we pay that our economy suffers anymore.

May God bless the families who have lost a important part of there lives. May we all offer a prayer for them in there time of need and for this great country that we live in.
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593. JRRP
Quoting alexhurricane1991:
Shear is below normal for early may

yeah.. is well below normal
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Quoting TexasGulf:
There happens to be an ideal fuel source which can be used in nuclear fusion reactors and can cleanly & safely replace coal, natural gas and nuclear energy derived electricity. It is called Helium-3 and is, ounce-for-ounce the single most precious compound known in the solar system. The moon's surface has adequate stores of Helium-3 to provide fusion generated electricity for the U.S. for thousands of years at present usage rates.

It would be a logistical problem to send unmanned mining vehicles to larger mapped deposit sites on the lunar surface to gather Helium-3, then return to earth with the payload.

Until we develop the technologies and will to use them... we have to use what is available, basically carbon based fuels which are cheap and plentiful.


I'm all for H3...but HJ won't go get us any. :( ;)
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Member Since: August 22, 2008 Posts: 12 Comments: 6010
There happens to be an ideal fuel source which can be used in nuclear fusion reactors and can cleanly & safely replace coal, natural gas and nuclear energy derived electricity. It is called Helium-3 and is, ounce-for-ounce the single most precious compound known in the solar system. The moon's surface has adequate stores of Helium-3 to provide fusion generated electricity for the U.S. for thousands of years at present usage rates.

It would be a logistical problem to send unmanned mining vehicles to larger mapped deposit sites on the lunar surface to gather Helium-3, then return to earth with the payload.

Until we develop the technologies and will to use them... we have to use what is available, basically carbon based fuels which are cheap and plentiful.
Member Since: April 28, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 354
583 - An addiction that will not stop anytime soon. Google -- who else is drilling in the Gulf, Russia and perhaps China? Yup, pick your poison as they say, tough choices to make in our future ....... L8R
Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8185
by the way has any one for got in what we had a few years a go today back in 1999
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Very eloquently spoken.

Thanks
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 421 Comments: 127550
Quoting adkinsadam1:


How can the United States have so many hundreds of off-shore oil rigs and not be properly prepared for something like this? That is my question!


Because elections have consequences. Generalizing, republican presidents believe in less regulation; democratic presidents believe in more. We just finished 8 years of republican oil men in the White House. The democrat has had only 1.5 years. Today, many would see the BP spill as an indication we're out of balance between regulation & profit. If true, it takes time for the pendulum to swing back to the middle.
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Good night all see you tomorrow
Member Since: April 8, 2010 Posts: 15 Comments: 2572
Well, we in the U.S. consume 20 Million barrels of oil per day. 12 Million BDP (or 500 Million gallons) is imported oil. The other 8 Million BPD (or 336 Million gallons) is produced domestically.

That's every day, 365 days per year... to feed our NEED for oil.

The oil has to come from somewhere! We could choose to import 100% of it, if we're willing to be completely dependent on other countries and pay really high prices for the oil.

If we could find a way to reduce our oil consumption by 8 Million BPD, then perhaps we wouldn't need to drill off our own shores.

That won't make us any safer though. The overwhelming majority of oil spills over the past 5-years have been from tankers... not from oil platforms. So long as we either domestically produce oil or import it... there will always be opportunity for major ecological damage due to spills.

There is no viable alternative on the horizon. We can cut back on our usage, perhaps even by 10-15% without severely harming our own economy... but overall we need every barrel these rigs are producing.

By all logic... 20 Million BPD (or 840 Million gallons / day) divided by 300 Million U.S. citizens... we each use on average 2.8 gallons of oil per day. That goes into fuel, electricity, tires, plastics, transport of goods, public services, road surfaces, roofing shingles, glues and adhesives, food packaging... you name it.

Try to get through ONE single day without touching or using anything made from oil. Betcha can't.
Member Since: April 28, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 354
Obscure law caps liability for oil companies



by WWLTV.com

wwltv.com

Posted on May 3, 2010 at 8:50 PM

NEW ORLEANS -- The New York Times is reporting that an obscure law that creates a fund to pay damage claims from oil spills also limits the liability of oil companies in covering the costs of damage claims from oil spills.

The oil spill liability trust fund contains $1.6 billion and is financed by an eight cent per barrel tax. The trust fund can be used to pay damage claims, like lost earnings for fishermen, but cannot be used for cleanup and containment.

The bill that created the trust fund also caps oil companies liability at $75 million.

Now a new bill authored by Sen. Robert Menendez, D-New Jersey, cleverly called the Big Oil Bailout Prevention Act would raise the liability cap for economic damages from $75 million to $10 billion.

BP is accepting damage claims. You can call the hotline at 1-800-440-0858. If you have already pursued a claim with BP and you are not satisfied with the resolution, you are urged to call the Coast Guard at 1-800-280-7118.

Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 421 Comments: 127550
Having lived on Prince William sound and sailing to many of ther remote Islands and observing all of that nature has. I ask those that say Prince William sound has not recovered tell me please the last time you were there and witnessed thi? If you haven't please don't talk of nothing you know.

Thanks
Mike
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Quoting AussieStorm:

That is the biggest question out of all this mess.


Hard to Mop properly at 5000 feet,but I share your voice and concern as well.

Madness rules in a industry not well regulated.

But can reap Billions in Misery.

I gotts ta have dat oil, for gas for my Ride to get a twinkie.

Which is wrapped in Plastic.



Is the filling made from Oil.

Or is that just a rumor ?

And the Oil flows on..

and out,..and up.

Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 421 Comments: 127550
Quoting adkinsadam1:
How can the United States have so many hundreds of off-shore oil rigs and not be properly prepared for something like this? That is my question!

That is the biggest question out of all this mess.
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Feel free to call the number that relates to your concern.





Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Response/www.deepwaterhorizonresponse.com

Gulf of Mexico-Transocean Drilling Incident


DATE: May 03, 2010 18:29:36 CST
The Ongoing Administration-Wide Response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

* Report oiled shoreline or request volunteer information:
(866)-448-5816
* Submit alternative response technology, services or products:
(281) 366-5511
* Submit your vessel as a vessel of opportunity skimming system:
(281) 366-5511
* Submit a claim for damages:
(800) 440-0858
* Report oiled wildlife:
(866) 557-1401





Deepwater Horizon Incident
Joint Information Center

Phone: (985) 902-5231
(985) 902-5240











In the Past 24 Hours:

* The President has dispatched the secretaries of Commerce, Interior and Homeland Security, as well as the NOAA Administrator, to return to the Gulf Coast this week. Specific details on their travel will come from their departments and agencies, but collectively they will be inspecting the ongoing, coordinated response efforts to mitigate the impact of the spill on public health, the environment and the economy. They will meet with business owners to discuss potential economic impacts of this spill across the Gulf Coast region.

* Secretary Salazar, Secretary Napolitano, EPA Administrator Jackson and other members of the Obama administration today met with BP CEO Tony Hayward and BP America Chairman and President Lamar McKay at the Department of the Interior to discuss ongoing, coordinated response efforts and receive an update on BP’s mitigation plans for potentially impacted Gulf Coast states. This is the most recent in a series of meetings that have taken place between administration leadership and BP leadership.

* Response crews continue to test a new technique to break up the oil before it reaches the surface—a remotely operated underwater vehicle dispensing sub-surface dispersant at a rate of nine gallons per minute—with encouraging results so far. Nearly 3,000 gallons of subsea dispersants were applied, and BP and NOAA continue to evaluate these tests to determine the feasibility of continued use of subsea dispersants.

* More than 2,000 volunteers have been trained to assist in the response effort to date. Volunteer recruitment efforts include outreach to local fishermen with boats, which can be used as vessels of opportunity to assist contractors in deploying boom.

* Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Dr. David Michaels visited Louisiana with a team of experienced hazardous materials professionals leading an effort to ensure that oil spill cleanup workers receive necessary protections from the hazards of this work. OSHA is consulting with BP, as well as federal agency partners, to ensure that workers receive appropriate training and protective equipment.

* Nine staging areas are now set up to protect vital shoreline in all potentially affected Gulf Coast states (Biloxi, Miss., Pensacola, Fla., Pascagoula, Miss., Dauphin Island, Ala., Port Sulphur, La., Shell Beach, La., Slidell, La., Port Fourchon, La., Venice, La.).

* BP is now accepting claims for the Gulf Coast oil spill. Please call BP’s helpline at 1-800-440-0858. A BP fact sheet with additional information is available here. For those who have already pursued the BP claims process and are not satisfied with BP’s resolution, can call the Coast Guard at 1-800-280-7118. More information about what types of damages are eligible for compensation under the Oil Pollution Act as well as guidance on procedures to seek that compensation can be found here.



By the Numbers to Date:

* Personnel were quickly deployed and approximately 3,000 are currently responding to protect the shoreline and wildlife.

* Nearly 200 vessels are responding on site, including skimmers, tugs, barges, and recovery vessels to assist in containment and cleanup efforts—in addition to dozens of aircraft, remotely operated vehicles, and multiple mobile offshore drilling units.

* Hundreds of thousands of feet of boom (barrier) have been deployed to contain the spill—nearly 700,000 feet are available.

* More than 1 million gallons of an oil-water mix have been recovered.

* More than 156,000 gallons of dispersant have been deployed. An additional 230,000 gallons are available.

* Nine staging areas have been set up to protect vital shoreline in all potentially affected Gulf Coast states (Biloxi, Miss., Pensacola, Fla., Pascagoula, Miss., Dauphin Island, Ala., Port Sulphur, La., Shell Beach, La., Slidell, La., Port Fourchon, La., Venice, La.).

* More than 2,000 volunteers have been trained to assist in the response effort to date.



Response Actions:

* The response to the BP Oil Spill began as an emergency search and rescue mission conducted and supported by the U.S. Coast Guard, the Navy and other partners on April 20. 126 people were on the rig when the incident occurred. 11 remain unaccounted for; 17 were injured, 3 of them critically.

* The President immediately began actively monitoring the incident, and held a meeting in the Oval Office on April 22 with senior officials to discuss the situation and ongoing response. The President has been in contact with all the governors of the states that may be affected and ordered that the administration use every single available resource at our disposal.

* Concurrently, command center operations were stood up immediately in the Gulf Coast to begin also addressing the environmental impact of the incident and coordinate with all state and local governments.

* The morning after the explosion, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar deployed Deputy Secretary David J. Hayes down to the gulf to assist with coordination and response to the incident.

* When the drill unit sank, the Administration immediately and intensely investigated by remotely operated vehicles the entire 5,000 feet of pipe that’s on the floor of the ocean. In that process three leaks were identified, the most recent coming on the evening of April 28.

* The Administration immediately began holding regular calls with BP leadership and numerous senior-level meetings have been held between the administration and BP to discuss BP's response effort and federal oversight and support.

* The National Response Team (NRT), an organization of 16 federal departments and agencies responsible for coordinating emergency preparedness and response to oil and hazardous substance pollution incidents was quickly activated and a coordinated group of federal partners-including the United States Coast Guard, Departments of Homeland Security, Commerce, Interior and the Environmental Protection Agency-immediately began directing and overseeing BP's response.

* The President dispatched Secretary Napolitano, Secretary Salazar, EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson, Assistant to the President for Energy and Climate Change Policy Carol Browner and NOAA Administrator Jane Lubchenco to the Gulf Coast to ensure all is being done to respond to this oil spill.

* EPA posted on its dedicated response website the first air monitoring data it has collected in the area—with no red flags at this time.

* President Obama visited the Gulf Coast to inspect response operations firsthand, underscoring the administration’s all-hands-on-deck response to protect the coastline of the Gulf states. He was accompanied by Assistant to the President for Homeland Security John Brennan and Assistant to the President for Energy and Climate Change Policy Carol Browner.

* NOAA is restricting fishing for a minimum of ten days in federal waters most affected by the BP oil spill, largely between Louisiana state waters at the mouth of the Mississippi River to waters off Florida’s Pensacola Bay. The closure is effective immediately. This order balances economic and health concerns and only closes those areas affected by oil. Details can be found here.

* BP is now accepting claims for the Gulf Coast oil spill. Please call BP’s helpline at 1-800-440-0858. A BP fact sheet with additional information is available here. For those who have already pursued the BP claims process and are not satisfied with BP’s resolution, can call the Coast Guard at 1-800-280-7118. More information about what types of damages are eligible for compensation under the Oil Pollution Act as well as guidance on procedures to seek that compensation can be found here.

* Secretaries Janet Napolitano and Ken Salazar spoke by conference call to Governors Haley Barbour (MS), Bob Riley (AL), Rick Perry (TX), Charlie Crist (FL) and the Deputy Chief of Staff to Gov. Bobby Jindal (LA). Gov. Jindal was with President Obama. They briefed the Governors on the ongoing response to the BP oil spill in the gulf. They spoke specifically about efforts to stop the oil leaks and mitigating the oil's impact on the shorelines of their states. Additionally, they spoke about ways to enhance what has been strong cooperation between the federal government and the states. The Secretaries and Governors agreed to speak again on May 4.

* BP has indicated it will reimburse volunteers at the rate of $10 per hour. Contractors are also hiring people to support shoreline clean up. Contractor rates go as high as $18 per hour for supervisors.

* The President has dispatched the secretaries of Commerce, Interior and Homeland Security, as well as the NOAA Administrator, to return to the Gulf Coast this week. Specific details on their travel will come from their departments and agencies, but collectively they will be inspecting the ongoing, coordinated response efforts, the impact of the spill on wildlife and the environment, and meeting with business owners to discuss potential economic impacts of this spill across the Gulf Coast region.

* Secretary Salazar, Secretary Napolitano, EPA Administrator Jackson and other members of the Obama administration today met with BP CEO Tony Hayward and BP America Chairman and President Lamar McKay at the Department of the Interior to discuss ongoing, coordinated response efforts and receive an update on BP’s mitigation plans for potentially impacted Gulf Coast states. This is the most recent in a series of meetings that have taken place between administration leadership and BP leadership.

* Response crews continue to test a new technique to break up the oil before it reaches the surface—a remotely operated underwater vehicle dispensing sub-surface dispersant at a rate of nine gallons per minute—with encouraging results so far. Nearly 3,000 gallons of subsea dispersants were applied, and BP and NOAA continue to evaluate these tests to determine the feasibility of continued use of subsea dispersants.

* More than 2,000 volunteers have been trained to assist in the response effort to date. Volunteer recruitment efforts include outreach to local fishermen with boats, which can be used as vessels of opportunity to assist contractors in deploying boom.

* Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Dr. David Michaels visited Louisiana with a team of experienced hazardous materials professionals leading an effort to ensure that oil spill cleanup workers receive necessary protections from the hazards of this work. OSHA is consulting with BP, as well as federal agency partners, to ensure that workers receive appropriate training and protective equipment.

Websites and Hotlines:

* For information about the response effort, visit www.deepwaterhorizonresponse.com.

* To volunteer, call 1-866-448-5816.

* To report oiled wildlife, call 1-866-557-1401. Messages will be checked hourly.

* To report spill related damage, please call 1-800-440-0858.

* For information about validated environmental air and water sampling results, visit www.epa.gov/bpspill.

* To file a claim, call BP’s helpline at 1-800-440-0858. A BP fact sheet with additional information is available here. For those who have already pursued the BP claims process and are not satisfied with BP’s resolution, can call the Coast Guard at 1-800-280-7118. More information about what types of damages are eligible for compensation under the Oil Pollution Act as well as guidance on procedures to seek that compensation can be found here.



Coordinated Interagency Asset Deployment and Response:

* The Department of Defense is fully integrated into the DHS-led team and fully supportive of all response activities. The Coast Guard and Department of Defense continue to work closely together, anticipating requirements, identifying response options, and rapidly providing response support.

* The Minerals Management Service remains in contact with all oil and gas operators in the sheen area. Two platforms have stopped production and one has been evacuated as a safety measure. Approximately 6.2 million cubic feet of natural gas is shut-in—less than one-tenth of a percent of daily gas production in the Gulf of Mexico.

* MMS is continuing inspection of all deepwater rigs and platforms as mandated by Secretary Salazar in the aftermath of the incident. MMS continues to ensure that BP moves forward on all methods to temporarily and permanently secure the source of the spill. Agency experts are working hand-in-hand with their Coast Guard counterparts to determine the original cause of the well flow and subsequent explosion.

* As the nation’s leading scientific resource for oil spills, NOAA has been on the scene of the BP spill from the start, providing coordinated scientific weather and biological response services to federal, state and local organizations. NOAA spill specialists are advising the U.S. Coast Guard on cleanup options as well as advising all affected federal, state and local partners on sensitive marine resources at risk in this area of the Gulf of Mexico.

* Two Modular Aerial Spray System (MASS) aircraft have been deployed in support of the incident in the Gulf of Mexico. Both aircraft have multiple missions scheduled daily, contingent on weather. These aircraft can dispense the same dispersant chemical being used by BP and the federal responders. Each system is capable of covering up to 250 acres per flight with three flights per aircraft per day.

* A C-17 aircraft carrying pollution response boom components for support flew from Travis AFB in California and has arrived at Mobile International Airport.

* In direct support of the Coast Guard under an existing pollution clean-up and salvage operations agreement, the Navy is providing a variety of oil pollution control equipment. The Navy has sent thousands of feet of inflatable oil boom with mooring equipment, several skimming systems, related support gear, and personnel to support oil spill response efforts. Naval Air Station Pensacola is serving as a staging facility for Coast Guard contractor-provided equipment.

* In response to the BP oil spill, the Secretary of Defense has authorized under Title 32 the mobilization of the Louisiana National Guard to help in the ongoing efforts to assist local communities in the cleanup and removal of oil and to protect critical habitats from contamination. As the responsible party in this incident, the government will hold BP accountable for the costs of the deployment.



Spill of National Significance & National Incident Commander:

* Secretary Napolitano announced that this incident is a Spill of National Significance (SONS) on April 29. This designation built on the efforts already underway from day one to leverage the full resources from across the federal government and ensure that all resources are brought to bear in response to this event.

* A SONS designation recognizes the need for a strategic management framework that ensures full engagement at the highest levels of the administration via the National Incident Commander. There is no additional funding or authority that comes with a SONS designation, as that authority already existed prior to this designation.

* As part of the designation of the BP Oil Spill as a Spill of National Significance, Secretary Napolitano announced that U.S. Coast Guard Commandant Admiral Thad Allen will serve as the National Incident Commander on May 1 for the administration's continued, coordinated response—providing additional coordinated oversight in leveraging every available resource to respond to the BP oil spill and minimize the associated environmental risks.

* As National Incident Commander, Admiral Allen will continue to work closely with Coast Guard Rear Admiral Mary Landry, the federal on-scene coordinator, and the Departments of Homeland Security, Defense, Interior and Commerce, the Environmental Protection Agency and other federal departments and agencies as appropriate—as well as BP, the responsible party in the spill—to ensure the efficient continued deployment and coordination of vital response assets, personnel and equipment that were activated immediately after the spill began.

Joint DHS-DOI Investigation:

* Early on, the President directed responding agencies to not only devote every resource to respond to this incident but to also determine its cause.

* Secretary Napolitano and Secretary Salazar signed an order establishing the next steps for a joint investigation that is currently underway into the causes of the explosion of the drilling rig Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico. The U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and the Minerals Management Service (MMS) share jurisdiction for the investigation.

* The joint investigation, which began on April 21, will have the power to issue subpoenas, hold public hearings, call witnesses, and take other steps that may be needed to determine the cause of the incident. It is proceeding under a Joint Statement of Principles and Convening Order, which convenes the formal joint investigation, and a Memorandum of Agreement, which lays out roles and responsibilities that relate to each agency’s area of expertise.



Fishing Restrictions

* NOAA is restricting fishing for a minimum of ten days in federal waters most affected by the BP oil spill, largely between Louisiana state waters at the mouth of the Mississippi River to waters off Florida’s Pensacola Bay. The closure is effective immediately. This order balances economic and health concerns and only closes those areas affected by oil. Details can be found here.

* Statement from Harlon Pearce, Chairman, Louisiana Seafood Promotion and Marketing Board: “The precautionary closure of the federal waters off the coast of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and part of Florida is a necessary action to insure the citizens of the United States and abroad that our seafood will maintain the highest level of quality we expect from the Gulf of Mexico. As chairman of the Louisiana Seafood Promotion and Marketing Board, I applaud Dr. Lubchenco’s decision to insure everyone that all seafood in the Gulf is of the highest quality and is safe to eat.”

* Statement from Ewell Smith, Executive Director, Louisiana Seafood Board: “We Support NOAA’s precautionary closure of the affected area so that the American consumer has confidence that the seafood they eat is safe. It is also very important to underscore the fact that this closure is only the affected area of the Gulf of Mexico, not the entire Gulf. The state waters of Louisiana West of the Mississippi River are still open and the seafood coming from that area is safe. That portion of waters represents about 77% of Louisiana seafood production of a 2.4 billion dollar economic impact to the state.”



Editorials and Validations:

* Mobile (Ala.) Press-Register “Editorial: Smart to put Coast Guard commandant in charge:” THE BEST move by the Obama administration since the Deepwater Horizon rig caught fire is putting Adm. Thad Allen, commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard, in charge. LINK



CONTACT INFORMATION

To report oiled shoreline or request volunteer information: (866)-448-5816

To submit alternative response technology, services or products: (281) 366-5511

To submit your vessel as a vessel of opportunity skimming system: (281) 366-5511

To submit a claim for damages: (800) 440-0858

To report oiled wildlife: (866) 557-1401

To contact the Deepwater Horizon Joint Information Center: (985) 902-5231

Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 421 Comments: 127550
Quoting alexhurricane1991:
Im not sure but seeing that i would say yes i would talk to storm or levi someone that has more knowledge than me.


Cool, I'll be checking in. I actually still lurk here quite a bit but the political storms fronts that push through here drive me nuts. Never know when you might get hit with an anvil strike! Once the season sets in, then folks get a lot more focused.
Cheers for now!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting JRRP:
Shear is below normal for early may
Member Since: April 8, 2010 Posts: 15 Comments: 2572
Well I think that if the oil spill continues unabated for three more months it will be a catastrophe. The GOM will be drenched in oil. The gulf stream will have carried the oil all the way up the east coast. Species will be wiped out. Ecosystems on which we rely in the gulf and Atlantic will be destroyed. Tourism to these areas will be non-existant. There will be significant alterations to the currents and possibly weather patterns. The domino effect will prevail and conditions will deteriorate.


How on earth can we possibly think that MORE oil rigs off the Atlantic Coast will be a GOOD thing? Oil and oceans are a recipe for disaster. Even the area in Alaska hit by the Exxon Valdez spill hasn't fully recovered yet.

How can the United States have so many hundreds of off-shore oil rigs and not be properly prepared for something like this? That is my question!
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574. JRRP
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Quoting guygee:
Hey AH, I extracted those SST images from today's weekly CPC ENSO update, thought I would share them here. I don't know if it is official yet, but it looks like another record has been set in April for the Atlantic Main Development region. Any official news yet?
Im not sure but seeing that i would say yes i would talk to storm or levi someone that has more knowledge than me.
Member Since: April 8, 2010 Posts: 15 Comments: 2572
Interesting (not brand new) vids

Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8185
Hey AH, I extracted those SST images from today's weekly CPC ENSO update, thought I would share them here. I don't know if it is official yet, but it looks like another record has been set in April for the Atlantic Main Development region. Any official news yet?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting beell:
LOL, atmo. Aggies can drill!
Now if we could just learn ya'll to use commas...

This will also, minimize the problems associated with riser gas

Oh, boy, do, they, need, some, tips, on, that,,,
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Hey guygee!
Member Since: April 8, 2010 Posts: 15 Comments: 2572
Photobucket
Photobucket
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Quoting Bordonaro:

Iceland Volcano closing air space over Ireland:
Link


i just saw that
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566. beell
LOL, atmo. Aggies can drill!
Now if we could just learn ya'll to use commas...

This will also, minimize the problems associated with riser gas
Member Since: September 11, 2007 Posts: 141 Comments: 16213
No. 553 Yeah. Hitting "Reload" seems to be the problem generating multiple posts on my Treo. When you say "exit" you mean simply going to another web address w/o signing out? I had thought identifying my Treo as a desktop through "skweezer" would work but no dice.
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One must assume with all the tropical inactivity across the globe that one basin this year will be above normal in terms of activity.

It'll be interesting to see what basin that will be.
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563. xcool



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Quoting sirmaelstrom:
I apologize for the multiple posts earlier, they were unintentional. I was posting from my phone. I think I have fixed the problem though. If it happens again I'll simply sign out. I don't think I was the one stretching the blog. If that appears to be the case let me know.
No prob.
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IOD might continue to dance around positive territory throughout the season.

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Quoting Ossqss:
Hummm,something to keep a pulse on that could impact the hurricane season also.......

Scientists warn Eyjafjallajokull could trigger the Katla volcano to erupt

"Katla has been dormant for decades, but since the eruption of Eyjafjallajokull , it has seen a 200% increase in activity."

Pitt expert keeps eye on second volcano in Iceland

Iceland Volcano closing air space over Ireland:
Link
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.