Flooding from record rains kills 11 in Tennessee; oil spill update

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 1:52 PM GMT on May 03, 2010

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Nashville, Tennessee remains virtually paralyzed this morning thanks to that city's heaviest recorded 1-day and 2-day rainfall in its history. A remarkable 7.25" of rain fell on the city Sunday, breaking the record for most rain in a single day (previously 6.60", set September 13, 1979.) Nashville's third greatest day of rainfall on record occurred Saturday, when 6.32" fell. Nashville also eclipsed its greatest 6-hour and 12-hour rainfall events on record, with 5.57" and 7.20", respectively, falling on Sunday. And, remarkably, only 2 days into the month, May 2010 is already the wettest May on record for Nashville.

Rainfall records were smashed all across Tennessee and Kentucky, with amounts as high as 17.73" recorded at Camden, TN, and 17.02" at Brownsville, TN. According to Chris Burt, the author of the excellent book Extreme Weather, the 13.30" that fell on Camden in 24 hours just missed eclipsing the state's all-time 24-hour precipitation record, the 13.60" inches that fell on Milan on September 13, 1982. Jackson, Tennessee had its rainiest day in its 63-year weather history on Sunday, 7.93". Bowling Green, Kentucky had its heaviest 2-day precipitation event on record, 9.67". Records in Bowling Green go back to 1870. The University of Wisconsin GOES Satellite Blog has some excellent imagery showing the remarkable plume of tropical moisture that crossed over Central America from the Eastern Pacific and fed the record rains.


Figure 1. Radar estimated rainfall for May 1 - 2, 2010 from the Nashville, Tennessee radar. A large region of the Tennessee and Kentucky received over ten inches of rain, with many areas receiving more than fifteen inches.


Figure 2. Flood forecast for the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. Image credit: NOAA.

The record rains triggered massive flooding that has killed at least eleven people in Tennessee, with two missing. The Cumberland River in downtown Nashville has surged to a height of 51', which is 11' over flood height, and the highest level the river has reached since a flood control project was completed in the early 1960s. The river is expected to crest this afternoon at 11.5' above flood stage, bringing flood waters to a large portion of the downtown area. The mayor has ordered all schools, parks, and libraries closed today, and commuter bus and train services have also been suspended. Five people died in Nashville due to the flooding. The Harpeth River at Bellevue, Tennessee to its greatest flood height since record keeping began in 1921. The river had a depth of 2 feet early Saturday morning before the rains began, and was running at a depth of 29' early this morning, breaking the record of 24.34' set in 1948. (To check out the flood heights, use our wundermap for Nashville with the "USGS River" layer turned on.) The Duck River at Hurricane Mills reached 28.7' yesterday morning before its streamgage stopped operating, its 2nd greatest flood height since record keeping began in 1926 (record: 30.7' in 1948.)

The record rains were accompanied by a surge of very warm air that set record high temperature marks at 21 major airports across the Eastern U.S. on Saturday; 19 more records were set on Sunday. This is not surprising, since more moisture can evaporate into warmer air, making record-setting rainfall events more likely when record high temperatures are present.


Figure 3. A portable classroom building from a nearby high school floats past submerged cars on I-24 near Nashville, TN on May 1, 2010. One person died in the flooding in this region of I-24. Roughly 200 - 250 vehicles got submerged on this section of I-24, according to wunderphotographer laughingjester, who was a tow truck operator called in to clear out the stranded vehicles.

Funding issues to take 17 Tennessee streamgages offline
According to the USGS web site, seventeen Tennessee streamflow gages with records going back up to 85 years will stop collecting data on July 1 because of budget cuts. With up to thirteen people in Tennessee dying from flooding this weekend, now hardly seems to be the time to be skimping on monitoring river flow levels by taking 17 of Tennessee's 94 streamflow gages out of service. These gages are critical for proper issuance of flood warnings to people in harm's way. Furthermore, Tennessee and most of the northern 2/3 of the U.S. can expect a much higher incidence of record flooding in coming decades. This will be driven by two factors: increased urban development causing faster run-off, and an increase in very heavy precipitation events due to global warming. Both factors have already contributed to significant increases in flooding events in recent decades over much of the U.S. According the landmark 2009 U.S. Climate Impact Report from the U.S. Global Change Research Program, "the amount of rain falling in the heaviest downpours has increased approximately 20 percent on average in the past century, and this trend is very likely to continue, with the largest increases in the wettest places." The USGS web site advertises that users who can contribute funding for the non-Federal share of costs to continue operation of these streamgages should contact Shannon Williams of the USGS Tennessee Water Science Center at 615-837-4755 or swilliam@usgs.gov. Tennessee is not the only state with streamgages at risk of closing down; fully 276 gages in 37 states have been shut down or will be shut down later this year (Figure 4.)


Figure 4. Streamgages that have been discontinued or are being considered for discontinuation or for conversion from continuous record discharge to stage-only stations. Funds for these 276 threatened streamgages are from the U.S. Geological Survey and other Federal, State, Tribal, and local agencies. For those streamgages that have already been discontinued, extensive efforts were made to find another funding source; however, when no funding was made available the streamgages had to be discontinued. For those streamgages at risk for discontinuation, the current funding source has indicated that it can no longer fund the streamgage. Efforts are currently underway to identify another funding source for the operation of these streamgages; however, if no funding is identified, then these streamgages will have to be discontinued also. If you have questions about specific streamgages, click on the state of concern on the USGS web page of threatened stream gages.

Oil spill update
The oil slick from the April 20 explosion and blowout of the offshore oil rig Deepwater Horizon has retreated from the coast, thanks to a slackening of the persistent onshore winds that have affected the northern Gulf of Mexico over the past week. Onshore winds of 10 - 15 knots will continue today, according to the latest NWS marine forecast, then shift to sideshore (out of the west) on Tuesday, as a cold front passes. Winds will then resume a weak onshore flow at 5 - 10 knots, Wednesday through Friday. These winds should cause only a slow transport of the oil slick towards the coast. I don't expect the spill will affect any land areas for the remainder of the week, with the possible exception of the mouth of the Mississippi River in Louisiana and the Chandeleur Islands. The latest forecast of Gulf currents from the NOAA HYCOM model (see also this alternative view of the HYCOM ocean current forecast) show weak ocean currents affecting the region during the remainder of the week. These currents will not be strong enough to push any oil southwards into the Loop Current over the next five days, so the Keys and South Florida are safe from oil for now.


Figure 5. Previous location and forecast location for tomorrow of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Image credit: NOAA Office of Response and Restoration. See also the trajectory maps available at State of Louisiana web site.

Jeff Masters

Flooding on I-24 (XMLP)
Flooding on I-24
Lick Creek Bridge (Wingman100)
God is cleaning out the creek and I think making a statement about cleanliness
Lick Creek Bridge
Removing the flood damaged cars and trucks. (laughingjester)
I am a wrecker driver for Martin's wrecker service. We were called to remove the vehicles that got caught in the flooding on interstate I 24 westbound near the Bell Road exit in Nashville Tennessee. Of course this is after the waters had subsided. It was roughly 200, 250 cars and trucks that got caught up in the flood. The debris to left is actually the remnants of a portable classroom that floated alongside the interstate and eventually rolled over and disintegrated.
Removing the flood damaged cars and trucks.

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Good morning all
Member Since: June 13, 2009 Posts: 2 Comments: 12697
659. IKE
Hurricane Forecasters See Worst Looming in 2010 Atlantic Season
May 03, 2010, 11:02 PM EDT

By Brian K. Sullivan

May 4 (Bloomberg) -- The 2010 Atlantic hurricane season may rival some of the worst in history as meteorological conditions mirror 2005, the record-breaking year that spawned New Orleans- wrecking Katrina, forecasters say.

The El Nino warming in the Pacific is fading and rain is keeping dust down in Africa, cutting off two phenomena that help retard Atlantic hurricane formation.

Perhaps most significantly, sea temperatures from the Cape Verde Islands to the Caribbean, where the storms usually develop, are above normal and reaching records in some areas.

“We have only seen that in three previous seasons, 2005, 1958 and 1969, and all three of those years had five major hurricanes,” said Jeff Masters, co-founder of Weather Underground Inc. “I am definitely thinking that this is going to be a severe hurricane season.”

With less than a month to go before the official June 1 start of the season, predictions are for 14 to 18 named storms. In an average year, there are 11 named storms with winds of at least 39 mph (62 kph), six of them reaching the 74-mph threshold for hurricanes and two growing into major storms with winds of 111 mph or more, the National Hurricane Center says.

Last year’s nine named storms were the fewest since 1997. Three became hurricanes and none made landfall in the U.S. As the number of hurricanes rises, so do the chances of one striking the oil-rich Gulf of Mexico or Florida’s agricultural areas.

Gulf Threat

The Gulf is home to about 27 percent of U.S. oil and 15 percent of U.S. natural gas production, the U.S. Department of Energy says. It also has seven of the 10 busiest U.S. ports, according to the Army Corps of Engineers. Florida is the second- largest producer of oranges after Brazil.

Energy disruptions could occur if 2010 produces a repeat of 2008, when hurricanes Gustav and Ike slammed into the Gulf Coast about a week apart, said Andy Lipow, president of Lipow Oil Associates, a Houston-based consulting company.

“The good news going into hurricane season is that we have significant amounts of inventories of gasoline and distillate fuels,” he said.

In 1998, storms caused 15 million barrels of oil outages and 48 billion cubic feet of natural gas outages in the Gulf, according to AccuWeather Inc. records. In 2005, it was 110 million barrels and 683 bcf, and in 2008, 62 million barrels of oil and 408 bcf of gas were shut in.

Storms’ Destruction

The usual misery and destruction from a Gulf hurricane hit may be magnified if the spill of crude from a burned-out rig near Louisiana hasn’t been stopped before storms arrive with winds and waves that could push oil inland.

In 2005, Katrina struck Louisiana, Mississippi and part of Alabama, unleashing floods that devastated New Orleans, killing more than 1,800 people, displacing 250,000 and causing about $125 billion in damage, according to the hurricane center.

Joe Bastardi, chief hurricane forecaster at AccuWeather in State College, Pennsylvania, said he doesn’t think the Atlantic can produce 28 storms this year, as it did in 2005, the most active year on record.

“I have 2005 in the mix” of years to compare to 2010, Bastardi said. “But if I had to choose, I would choose 1998 over 2005.”

In 1998, 14 named storms formed, 11 of which turned into hurricanes, according to Weather Underground’s website. There were 15 hurricanes in 2005.

AccuWeather’s Call

AccuWeather currently calls for 16 to 18 storms to form. Bastardi predicts the current El Nino will change into a La Nina, cooling the Pacific in time to influence the hurricane season, which runs through Nov. 30.

While El Nino fades, hot spots in the Atlantic set a monthly record in March, breaking a mark set in 1969, and tied the high set in June 2005, Masters said. Hurricanes draw on warm water to form and gain strength.

Colorado State University researchers William Gray and Phil Klotzbach chose 1958, 1966, 1969, 1998 and 2005 as the years that shared the most similarities with 2010.

In 1958, 10 storms, including five major hurricanes, formed after an El Nino faded.

In 1969, Hurricane Camille crashed into the U.S. Gulf Coast with winds in excess of 200 miles per hour. The exact strength is unknown because the storm destroyed all the wind measurement devices. It killed 256 people and caused $1.4 billion in damage.

East at Risk

The U.S. coast from North Carolina to Maine has a raised risk of being hit by a hurricane this year, said Todd Crawford, chief meteorologist for Andover, Massachusetts-based WSI Inc.

The Northeast usually has about a 25 percent chance of a hurricane strike, Crawford said. This year, it has a 48 percent chance, close to the 50 percent chance the Gulf of Mexico and Florida have every year, he said.

“We’re not too bullish on the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast,” said Jim Rouiller, a senior energy meteorologist at Planalytics Inc. in Berwyn, Pennsylvania. “We’re liking the track threatening Florida and the eastern Gulf, followed by the entire Gulf and the third emphasis would be on the Carolinas.”

Rouiller said he believes a trough will develop along the U.S. East Coast from the mid-Atlantic states through New England, shielding the region. That may mean more risk for the Canadian Maritime provinces, which have some oil platforms and refineries.

The U.S. Climate Prediction Center will issue its forecast on May 20.

Get Ready

Each year, the Miami-based National Hurricane Center urges everyone living along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts to prepare for a storm strike, Dennis Feltgen, a spokesman, said in an e- mail.

“It’s very important to note that a seasonal outlook cannot forecast where and when storms will form, let alone if or where they will make landfall and at what strength,” Feltgen said. “It only takes one storm hitting your area to make it a bad year, regardless of the number of storms that are forecast in the seasonal outlook.”

An example of how one storm can overshadow an entire season came in 1992. That year, only six named storms and one sub- tropical system formed, and only two of those made landfall, according to hurricane center records.

One of them was Hurricane Andrew, which devastated parts of Florida and Louisiana, killing 26 people and causing $26.5 billion in damage. Its top winds of 165 at landfall in Florida made it a Category 5 storm, the most powerful on the five-step Saffir-Simpson Scale.

It was only the third time such a powerful storm hit the U.S.

--Editors: Charlotte Porter, Dan Stets

To contact the reporter on this story: Brian K. Sullivan in Boston at bsullivan10@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Dan Stets at dstets@bloomberg.net
Member Since: June 9, 2005 Posts: 23 Comments: 37860
Good morning. Cayman Islands 7:09 am and already 85F. I see Haiti had two earthquakes yesterday. A 4.0 and 4.4
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Quoting futuremet:


????


LOL, Amanda was not a girl. Never again.
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Quoting drg0dOwnCountry:



Higher Temps = More Disaster.


Wow, those temperatures are rising like crazy (just as I predicted) even past the El Nino peak it is accelerating, hopefully the volcanic eruptions cooled things down if only a bit.
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654. IKE
Quoting Jeff9641:


IKE I've seen totals near you of 12 to 13" of rain. Is there flooding going on by you?


No flooding here.
Member Since: June 9, 2005 Posts: 23 Comments: 37860
80 degrees at 5:52AM (EDT)in Dunedin, FL --- Pinellas County.
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Morning Ike, Aqua, and all others. Beautiful here in Mobile. A little humid, but other than that it is rather nice outside.
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Ike's rain gauge will hold eleven inches...if he needs a bigger rain gauge, we're all in trouble.

(pull the inner tube out, pour it out, put the funnel in the inner tube, pour the contents of the outer tube into it)
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649. DDR
Quoting pottery:
Good Morning.
Fantastic morning here. Birds are singing, 2 squirrels are squabbling in a mango tree, a Toucan is sitting in a Pink Poui tree and calling out for whatever they call out for, and the Sun is already Hot, at 7:16 am.
If it does not start to rain soon, the leaves on my Calabash tree are going to fall off again??

Hi pottery,i thought we'd have more rain by now.Fall off again,has it sprouted young leaves?Alot other trees have.
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SST off the Florida east coast are rapidly warming.
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646. IKE
From the latest tropical weather discussion....

...DISCUSSION...

GULF OF MEXICO...
A COLD FRONT EXTENDS FROM THE FLORIDA PANHANDLE NEAR SANTA ROSA
ISLAND TO A 1011 MB SURFACE LOW PRESSURE CENTER NEAR 29N89W
CONTINUING SOUTH AS A STATIONARY FRONT TO NEAR 26N91W. SCATTERED
MODERATE TO ISOLATED STRONG CONVECTION IS WITHIN 40 NM OF THE
COLD FRONT...AND WEAK TO MODERATE CONVECTION WITHIN 50 NM EITHER
SIDE OF THE STATIONARY FRONT. MARINE OBSERVATIONS ACROSS THE
BASIN SHOW WEAK PRESSURE GRADIENT...THUS WINDS AHEAD OF THE
FRONTAL SYSTEM ARE SOUTHEASTERLY 10-15 KT...WHILE VARIABLE AT
5-10 KT BEHIND THE SYSTEM. A DRY AND STABLE AIRMASS IS FOUND
ELSEWHERE OUTSIDE THE AREA OF CONVECTIVE ACTIVITY. COMPUTER
MODELS INDICATE THE ACTIVITY WILL BARELY SHIFT EASTWARD OVER THE
NEXT 24 TO 36 HOURS...MOVING THE CONVECTION TO THE NORTHEAST
CORNER OF THE BASIN INCLUDING THE NORTHERN FLORIDA PENINSULA.
Member Since: June 9, 2005 Posts: 23 Comments: 37860
Good Morning.......Tallahassee getting ready for their morning soaking and I came into the office early to beat the rain.......No severe weather expected so I'm looking forward to the rain........Have to wait till later in the day to see what happens for NE Florida; you might get a flare-up in the line later in the day as I see some storms starting to pop up off shore in the Gulf due south of Panama City headed towards the Big Bend.....That might be part of the main rainmaker for the Jacksonville area when that area reaches the coast later this afternoon with daytime heating.
Member Since: August 8, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 9342
Quoting IKE:


LOL...it does okay.

I see clouds to your east-southeast.

Yeah. Seeing them too. And a reduction of Sahara Dust over the past couple days too. Lots of dry air still though.
Not unusual really. We expect showers in May, as we transition into the rainy season in June. But this dry season started early, and rainfall in Nov and Dec was very much below average. Also the temps have been higher than usual too. Hence the "drought".
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643. IKE
Quoting pottery:
Sounds like a deeper guage is in order, Ike.


LOL...it does okay.

I see clouds to your east-southeast.
Member Since: June 9, 2005 Posts: 23 Comments: 37860
642. IKE
I see a cloud mass east-southeast of the islands.....

Member Since: June 9, 2005 Posts: 23 Comments: 37860
Sounds like a deeper guage is in order, Ike.
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640. IKE
Quoting severstorm:

OK How do you forget to read a gauge? LOL LOL


I just got it from aquak about 3 months ago. If you get over an inch you have to pour each succeeding inch into the one-inch gauge.

That's just the 2nd time I've had over an inch in 24 hours....in other words, I forgot.

*reaches for dunce cap*

Now back to your regularly scheduled program.
Member Since: June 9, 2005 Posts: 23 Comments: 37860
Good Morning.
Fantastic morning here. Birds are singing, 2 squirrels are squabbling in a mango tree, a Toucan is sitting in a Pink Poui tree and calling out for whatever they call out for, and the Sun is already Hot, at 7:16 am.
If it does not start to rain soon, the leaves on my Calabash tree are going to fall off again??
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Quoting IKE:


Actually I had had more then that by then. I forgot how to read my rain gauge when it totaled over an inch.

Yeah...I don't need any rain for awhile. It's raining again now.

OK How do you forget to read a gauge? LOL LOL
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637. IKE
Quoting severstorm:
Hey Ike, you got alot of rain last night. I saw around 5:30 yesterday you were around 1.19. not to dry anymore!


Actually I had had more then that by then. I forgot how to read my rain gauge when it totaled over an inch.

Yeah...I don't need any rain for awhile. It's raining again now.
Member Since: June 9, 2005 Posts: 23 Comments: 37860
Hey Ike, you got alot of rain last night. I saw around 5:30 yesterday you were around 1.19. not to dry anymore!
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635. IKE
I've got 70.0 outside my window...right now......
Member Since: June 9, 2005 Posts: 23 Comments: 37860
Morning all, Nice morning here in w c fl 69.3 and maybe a t-storm later today
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morning all

expecting a good dousing here today in NE fla. Ike, 3.76? Doubt we'll see that much but it's awfully humid.
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632. IKE
NWS in Tallahassee was on-target with the flash flood watch here yesterday. I didn't think it would happen.....total of....

3.76 inches of rain yesterday in my rain gauge.


FLOOD WATCH
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE TALLAHASSEE FL
424 AM EDT TUE MAY 4 2010

...FLASH FLOOD WATCH IN EFFECT THROUGH LATE TONIGHT FOR SOUTHEAST
ALABAMA...SOUTHWEST AND SOUTH CENTRAL GEORGIA...AND THE FLORIDA
PANHANDLE AND BIG BEND...

.A WEAK AND SLOW MOVING COLD FRONT WILL BE PRECEDED BY A BAND OF
RAIN THAT WILL AFFECT THE REGION THROUGH TONIGHT. AN ABNORMALLY HIGH
AMOUNT OF MOISTURE...THE SLOW MOVEMENT OF THE COLD FRONT...AND
SOUTHWEST WINDS THROUGHOUT MUCH OF THE ATMOSPHERE...MAY ALLOW
SOME THUNDERSTORMS WITH VERY HEAVY RAIN TO PASS OVER THE SAME
AREAS FOR HOURS AT A TIME...POSSIBLY PRODUCING LIFE THREATENING
FLASH FLOODS. THE HEAVY RAIN THREAT WILL SLOWLY SHIFT FROM WEST TO
EAST DURING THE DAY TODAY...LESSENING THE THREAT FOR FLASH
FLOODING IN ALABAMA AND THE FLORIDA PANHANDLE LATER TODAY.

ALZ065>069-FLZ007>013-108-112-GAZ120>128-142>145-155-156-042200-
/O.EXT.KTAE.FF.A.0002.000000T0000Z-100505T0600Z/
/00000.0.UU.000000T0000Z.000000T0000Z.000000T0000Z.OO/
COFFEE-DALE-HENRY-GENEVA-HOUSTON-INLAND WALTON-CENTRAL WALTON-
HOLMES-WASHINGTON-JACKSON-INLAND BAY-CALHOUN-SOUTH WALTON-
COASTAL BAY-QUITMAN-CLAY-RANDOLPH-TERRELL-DOUGHERTY-LEE-WORTH-
TURNER-EARLY-MILLER-BAKER-MITCHELL-SEMINOLE-DECATUR-
INCLUDING THE CITIES OF...ENTERPRISE...OZARK...FORT RUCKER...
DALEVILLE...HEADLAND...ABBEVILLE...GENEVA...HARTFORD...SAMSON...
SLOCOMB...MALVERN...TAYLOR...ASHFORD...KINSEY...COWARTS...WEBB...
COTTONWOOD...REHOBETH...DE FUNIAK SPRINGS...HUDSON...BONIFAY...
CRYSTAL LAKE...CHIPLEY...FIVE POINTS...MARIANNA...GRACEVILLE...
MALONE...SNEADS...YOUNGSTOWN...BLOUNTSTOWN...FREEPORT...
SANTA ROSA BEACH...PANAMA CITY...PARKER...GEORGETOWN...
FORT GAINES...CUTHBERT...SHELLMAN...ARLINGTON...MORGAN...EDISON...
LEARY...DAWSON...ALBANY...LEESBURG...SMITHVILLE...SYLVESTER...
ASHBURN...DOUGLASVILLE...BLAKELY...COLQUITT...NEWTON...CAMILLA...
PELHAM...DONALSONVILLE...BAINBRIDGE
424 AM EDT TUE MAY 4 2010 /324 AM CDT TUE MAY 4 2010/

...FLASH FLOOD WATCH NOW IN EFFECT THROUGH LATE TONIGHT...

THE FLASH FLOOD WATCH IS NOW IN EFFECT FOR

* PORTIONS OF SOUTHEAST ALABAMA...FLORIDA AND GEORGIA...
INCLUDING THE FOLLOWING AREAS...IN SOUTHEAST ALABAMA...
COFFEE...DALE...GENEVA...HENRY AND HOUSTON. IN FLORIDA...
CALHOUN...CENTRAL WALTON...COASTAL BAY...HOLMES...INLAND BAY...
INLAND WALTON...JACKSON...SOUTH WALTON AND WASHINGTON. IN
GEORGIA...BAKER...CALHOUN...CLAY...DECATUR...DOUGHERTY...
EARLY...LEE...MILLER...MITCHELL...QUITMAN...RANDOLPH...
SEMINOLE...TERRELL...TURNER AND WORTH.

* THROUGH LATE TONIGHT

* FOR POSSIBLE VERY HEAVY RAIN

A BAND OF RAIN WILL CONTINUE MOVING SLOWLY EAST ACROSS THE REGION
THIS MORNING...PRODUCING AREAS OF HEAVY RAIN. MOST AREAS WILL
RECEIVE RAIN AMOUNTS OF AROUND 2 INCHES...BUT A FEW AREAS COULD
GET UP TO 6 INCHES OF RAIN IN A FAIRLY SHORT TIME. IT IS THESE
AREAS THAT MAY EXPERIENCE FLASH FLOODING...ESPECIALLY IN LOW LYING
AREAS...POORLY DRAINING LOCATIONS...AND URBAN AREAS. ALSO...AREAS
THAT HAVE RECENTLY RECEIVED HEAVY RAIN WILL OBVIOUSLY BE MORE
VULNERABLE. A BAND OF HEAVY RAIN SET UP OVER PORTIONS OF THE
FLORIDA PANHANDLE MONDAY AFTERNOON AND EVENING...AND THE STORM
TOTAL RAINFALL ESTIMATED BY LOCAL RADARS WAS UP TO A FOOT NEAR ROCK
HILL IN WALTON COUNTY.
THE THREAT FOR HEAVY RAIN IS EXPECTED TO
END FROM WEST TO EAST LATER TODAY.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A FLASH FLOOD WATCH MEANS THAT CONDITIONS MAY DEVELOP THAT LEAD
TO FLASH FLOODING. FLASH FLOODING IS A VERY DANGEROUS SITUATION.

MONITOR LATER FORECASTS AND BE PREPARED TO TAKE ACTION SHOULD
FLASH FLOOD WARNINGS BE ISSUED.

&&

$$..........



Rock Hill is south of Defuniak Springs...half-way to Freeport,FL. and about 20 miles inland.
Member Since: June 9, 2005 Posts: 23 Comments: 37860
631. MahFL
Iceland Volcano.

Iceland Volcano
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Good Evening AussieStorm and good morning to the rest from a rather wet Puerto Rico. The Aussies are down to 0.5 the same as Climate Prediction Center.

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I wasn't here for this Amanda person but this came up before so I looked up some of her posts
It turned out she was a guy who was banned from the blog and sneaked back in under the new name. I think Amanda was going on some blog rampage and she blurted she was really a previous blogger, niether name has showed up since
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Quoting altesticstorm10:
Hey futuremet -- weren't you the guy who was going out with that Amanda girl who used to post here in like 2008? I thought I heard that somewhere...TIA


????
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Quoting truecajun:
You know, I'm starting to wonder. Are all of these disasters "normal". I'm not trying to start a political discussion, I'm just wondering if anyone else is beginning to question whether or not someone above is not happy with us. We had crazy hurricane seasons, Haiti quake, Chile quake, Iceland volcano, the spill, terrorist attacks, and the Napa quake is bound to trigger something more in the near future.

ORRRRR, does this stuff happen every generation and every generation wonders the same thing I'm wondering, but really it's all just a cycle?

Again, I'm JUST WONDERING.
increased internet connectivity world wide = perception that there are more disasters and that they are worse disaters,higher temps= more flood potential.........
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Well thats hope Pat
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Fishermen voice concerns over fine print in BP contracts

As the battle to keep the drifting oil away from Louisiana's coast continues, the legal fight is just beginning. Bigad Shaban explains why attorneys say they've already scored a win over BP in the name of the hundreds of fisherman they represent.
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Oil wells in California
Link
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622. xcool
membership here for 2yr..i'm just go stop post it justing move on...
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Quoting xcool:
BenBIogger yeah i pay 25$ ..


For the Accuweather.com membership or just for the images.

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620. xcool
BenBIogger yeah i pay 25$ ..
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Quoting xcool:
someone use my image from AccuWeather.com to post on forms .i'm not happy.


Do you own the "Images"?
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Quoting altesticstorm10:
Hey futuremet -- weren't you the guy who was going out with that Amanda girl who used to post here in like 2008? I thought I heard that somewhere...TIA


I remember "her", she was really a guy or something. Psycho..
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617. xcool
someone use my image from AccuWeather.com to post on forms .i'm not happy.
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BP Oil Spill Incident Response Site

www.deepwaterhorizonresponse.com

Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Response

Gulf of Mexico-Transocean Drilling Incident


DATE: May 03, 2010 21:59:42 CST
PHOTO RELEASE: Discoverer Enterprise drillship, Development Drill III

* Report oiled shoreline or request volunteer information:
(866)-448-5816
* Submit alternative response technology, services or products:
(281) 366-5511
* Submit your vessel as a vessel of opportunity skimming system:
(281) 366-5511
* Submit a claim for damages:
(800) 440-0858
* Report oiled wildlife:
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ROBERT, La. - The Transocean drillship, Discoverer Enterprise, prepares to conduct recovery operation for BP using a specially-built "dome" at the sea floor Monday, May 3, 2010. With the use of the dome and connection system to flow the leaking oil the crew of the Discoverer Enterprise will be capable of recovering up to 125,000 barrels of oil. Photo provided by Transocean.



ROBERT, La. - The Transocean drillship, Discoverer Enterprise, prepares to conduct recovery operation for BP using a specially-built "dome" at the sea floor Monday, May 3, 2010. With the use of the dome and connection system to flow the leaking oil the crew of the Discoverer Enterprise will be capable of recovering up to 125,000 barrels of oil. Photo provided by Transocean.





ROBERT, La. - The ultra-deepwater semisubmersible rig Development Drill III had begun operations for drilling a relief well Monday, May 3, 2010. A relief well is designed to drill down and intersect the existing well bore and pump heavy fluids and cement in to stop the leaking oil. Photo provided by Transocean.

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615. JRRP
Quoting xcool:
i'm mad at wunderground

why ?
Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 6203
614. xcool
i'm mad at wunderground
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613. JRRP
Quoting futuremet:


The below normal shear is primarily due to a strong deep-layered high pressure system over the western Atlantic. These type of highs can sometimes be just as bad as shear for tropical cyclones. They cause too much sinking air, or low level divergence.

If a high extends beyond 500mb, it will cause too much capping at the surface and mid levels.




Anticyclones that are near the 200mb levels are perfect tropical cyclone formation. They help the ventilate a tropical cyclone's outflow effectively.

thanks a lot... now i understand :)

current shear

24hrs

48hrs

Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 6203
OZ, Sometimes reading about your adventures is almost too much. Whatever crossed your mind to have a 2x4 thrown at your face? Couldn't you have tested your face gear by placing it on a dummy? ...perhaps a foam wig stand or volley ball? This is why we use crash dummies.

Seriously, I admire your dedication and look forward to some outstanding footage. ..but please take care...
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Quoting truecajun:
You know, I'm starting to wonder. Are all of these disasters "normal". I'm not trying to start a political discussion, I'm just wondering if anyone else is beginning to question whether or not someone above is not happy with us. We had crazy hurricane seasons, Haiti quake, Chile quake, Iceland volcano, the spill, terrorist attacks, and the Napa quake is bound to trigger something more in the near future.

ORRRRR, does this stuff happen every generation and every generation wonders the same thing I'm wondering, but really it's all just a cycle?

Again, I'm JUST WONDERING.



Higher Temps = More Disaster.
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Oh, and i forgot to mention the economy. that's a big one too. that's definitely one the history books too.

and the floods in tennessee
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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