Global warming unthaws warrior mermaids and mermen frozen during last ice age

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 12:49 PM GMT on April 01, 2010

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Global warming has unthawed an entire race of warrior mermen and mermaids in the Arctic, scientists revealed today. At a packed press conference in Boulder, Colorado, Dr. Mark Xyzzy of the National Institute for Cryosphere Exploration and Tertiary Research on Yetis (NICETRY) revealed the details of the discovery: "We've been operating robot research submarines under the sea ice in the Chukchi Sea north of Barrow, Alaska this winter, as part of International Geophysical Year studies on the dynamics of arctic sea ice loss," commented Dr. Xyzzy. "Last week, one of our submersibles caught a remarkable video of a warrior mermaid, armed with a trident, riding past the submarine on the back of a narwhal. We were able to track the mermaid to her home--an underwater merfolk city at the bottom of the Chukchi Sea. The city had been thawed out in 2005 by warm water currents invading the Arctic due to global warming. These mermaids and mermen had been frozen into the underwater permafrost since the onset of the last ice age, 115,000 years ago. We undertook immediate efforts to establish communications with the merfolk, by sending in divers with underwater writing boards who were able to work out a simple symbol-based language. We learned that the Chukchi Sea merfolk are at war with a tribe of rival merfolk in the Greenland Sea. The two tribes have been fighting a heated underwater battle for dominance of the Arctic Ocean ever since global warming thawed out both tribes in 2005. It is the explosions from their undersea battles that have been the dominant cause of arctic sea ice loss since 2005, not global warming, as had been previously assumed. A team of experienced United Nations negotiators is now in the Arctic, attempting to broker a truce between the rivals and save the arctic sea ice from further destruction."


Figure 1. Merfolk negotiator Urgok Nzgradborkan and an exhausted U.N. diplomat take a break after a grueling all-night round of peace talks.

Critics of climate change science immediately pounced upon the news to unleash a new barrage of criticism against the National Intergovernmental and Territorial Panel to Investigate Climate Change (NITPICC). "The computer climate models used by the NITPICC utterly failed to anticipate the record loss of arctic sea ice due to underwater explosions from merfolk battles," commented spokesman Markoff Chaney of the Very Competitive Free Enterprise Institute. The Institute maintains of staff of top-notch scientists who swear that their funding from the fossil fuel industry does not affect the objectivity of their science. "This new "mermaid-gate" scandal proves that we can't trust climate models to say diddly-squat that's right about global warming, nah-nah-na-nah-nah!" taunted Chaney.

The head of NITPICC, Dr. R. J. Donteventrytopronouncemylastname, conceded that his organization had some work to do. "We're working very hard to incorporate the effect of underwater explosions from merfolk sea battles into the NITPICC models," said Dr. Donteventrytopronouncemylastname. "We've also begun to explore the impacts on sea ice should other denizens of the Arctic unthaw. For instance, the possibility exists that plesiosaurs from the time of the dinosaurs may be frozen in the underwater arctic permafrost. Should global warming thaw out these great leviathans of the deep, the turbulence from their swimming motions could cause significant cracking and breakup of the sea ice. We now have a new plesiosaur parameterization module built into our top models to account for this possibility."

Dr. Xyzzy of NICETRY commented, "I applaud NITPICC's efforts to incorporate their Underwater Merfolk Battle Module and Plesiosaur Parameterization Module into the climate models. However, I caution that they might also need to build modules to simulate the effects of astrology, thermography, ice-nine, and the warming effect of hot air coming out of Washington politicians, before critics of the NITPICC models will be satisfied."

April Fools!

Internet radio appearance today
I'll be appearing with San Francisco-based wunderground meteorologists Shaun Tanner and Tim Roche on The Daily Downpour Internet radio show at 4:20 pm EDT today, to talk about weather, hurricanes, and climate change. There will not be the opportunity to call in today. No foolin'!

Jeff Masters

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Quoting SevereHurricane:


Here's one... In 2005, in the few weeks before Katrina, the squirrels and all the other tree critters were eating and storing the nuts like crazy. They usually didn't begin doing that until October/November. I know because for years I would walk my dog around the block every morning before school.
We would all do well to observe the behaviour of animals as they seem to sense changes in the weather.
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Quoting SevereHurricane:


Here's one... In 2005, in the few weeks before Katrina, the squirrels and all the other tree critters were eating and storing the nuts like crazy. They usually didn't begin doing that until October/November. I know because for years I would walk my dog around the block every morning before school.


My point being that the animals that live in the trees sensed that something was up and that they needed to store their food early.
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Also am remembering the doc's post about the turtles.... and we did have a good discussion about ant / insect and bird behaviours prior to storms or even busy storm years.

Maybe Levi's right and somebody should pull all that "wive's tales" pre-satellite info together...
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Quoting BahaHurican:
Yeah, this was our experience here also - relatively few fruit. The trees did blossom, but the winds seemed to blow down most of the blossoms and then much of the developing fruit while it was still quite young. We still have 3 trees left in our yard after the 1999-2004 period, and while each has its ideosycraciesideosycracies, none of them was particularly productive last year.


How are they doing so far this year?
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26701
NHC director Bill Read announced tonight from Orlando that NOAA will release its first 2010 forecast on May 20.
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Quoting stormwatcherCI:
Don't discount the old wives tales as there is some basis for them. 2004 about a week before Ivan Cayman's roads were covered with small red crabs we call red shanks. The older folks said it reminded them of the 1932 hurricane which hit the Cayman Islands resulting in many deaths. There were so many red shanks in 2004 it looked like we had red carpets on the roads.


The animal ones are the best. They definitely know more than plants...lol.
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26701
Quoting stormwatcherCI:
I live in the Cayman Islands and last year there were very few mangoes and not many mature enough to eat.


Oh ok...somehow I thought you lived on the gulf coast. That makes sense now lol.

Hmm well, not much difference in precipitation between last year and this year. Both winters December-February saw normal to below normal precipitation.

Dec-Feb 2008-2009 Precip Anomaly:



Dec-Feb 2009-2010 Precip Anomaly




No major temperature differences either. 2009 was slightly colder but not by much.

Dec-Feb 2008-2009 Temp Anomaly:



Dec-Feb 2009-2010 Temp Anomaly:

Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26701
Quoting stormwatcherCI:
I live in the Cayman Islands and last year there were very few mangoes and not many mature enough to eat.
Yeah, this was our experience here also - relatively few fruit. The trees did blossom, but the winds seemed to blow down most of the blossoms and then much of the developing fruit while it was still quite young. We still have 3 trees left in our yard after the 1999-2004 period, and while each has its idiosyncracies, none of them was particularly productive last year.
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Quoting stormwatcherCI:
Don't discount the old wives tales as there is some basis for them. 2004 about a week before Ivan Cayman's roads were covered with small red crabs we call red shanks. The older folks said it reminded them of the 1932 hurricane which hit the Cayman Islands resulting in many deaths. There were so many red shanks in 2004 it looked like we had red carpets on the roads.


Here's one... In 2005, in the few weeks before Katrina, the squirrels and all the other tree critters were eating and storing the nuts like crazy. They usually didn't begin doing that until October/November. I know because for years I would walk my dog around the block every morning before school.
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Great spoof. I sent it to all my science denying friends.
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Quoting Greyelf:


LOL...here come the ant and turtle discussions. :)
Don't discount the old wives tales as there is some basis for them. 2004 about a week before Ivan Cayman's roads were covered with small red crabs we call red shanks. The older folks said it reminded them of the 1932 hurricane which hit the Cayman Islands resulting in many deaths. There were so many red shanks in 2004 it looked like we had red carpets on the roads.
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Quoting Levi32:


I wish we could get all the old-timers "wives tales" about hurricane signs all collected in one place. A lot of them actually can be taken seriously.

Where do you live? And do you know anything about what mangos were doing in recent years? Like if they predicted no hurricane landfalls last year.
I live in the Cayman Islands and last year there were very few mangoes and not many mature enough to eat.
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Quoting indianrivguy:


don't buy into that being an indicator. Mangos originally came from a higher altitude and are eccentric in producing crops. Cold, but not freezing weather seems to bring on a large bloom and as we had some this winter, that is likely, IMO, the cause. Don't know how interested you are in Mangos, but here is a very good article on their history; From Tequesta Magazine 1956
Mango growing in early Miami
Yes, I know you have had some freezing weather this winter but we surely haven't. The lowest it went was the mid 60's so I don't think that is it down here.
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Quoting BahaHurican:
Yeah, the myth behind the event is that the mangos "know" high winds are coming to "lick down the likkle chilren dem" and therefore produce early to get the fruit out before the height of the season..... lol

I'm sure there are some other, more scientific reasons, like shifts in rain patterns, that are influencing what happens. ;o)

Well, mango blossom season is usually more end of March than Feb; usually the trees are still covered around this time, but this year they are already done. Last year we had a double-flowering. The trees went back to blossoming after there were already small to middle-sized fruit on most of them. That was weird - doesn't happen often from my recollection.

And indianrivguy, I can see some correlations between temps and volume of blossom, but I don't know if it's more temps or more rainfall that affects timing....

Well, we haven't even had 2" of rain so far this year and we already have decent size(edible) mangoes on the trees.
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Quoting BahaHurican:
Yeah, the myth behind the event is that the mangos "know" high winds are coming to "lick down the likkle chilren dem" and therefore produce early to get the fruit out before the height of the season..... lol

I'm sure there are some other, more scientific reasons, like shifts in rain patterns, that are influencing what happens. ;o)

Well, mango blossom season is usually more end of March than Feb; usually the trees are still covered around this time, but this year they are already done. Last year we had a double-flowering. The trees went back to blossoming after there were already small to middle-sized fruit on most of them. That was weird - doesn't happen often from my recollection.

And indianrivguy, I can see some correlations between temps and volume of blossom, but I don't know if it's more temps or more rainfall that affects timing....



Yeah I have no idea. I don't know how many of these things really foreshadow a certain kind of hurricane season, but I know at least some of them have scientific or meteorological reasons behind them.
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26701
Quoting stormwatcherCI:
I have been hearing older folks saying lately that the early mango season is a sign for a bad hurricane season down here. Mangoes all over the place now.
Yeah, the myth behind the event is that the mangos "know" high winds are coming to "lick down the likkle chilren dem" and therefore produce early to get the fruit out before the height of the season..... lol

I'm sure there are some other, more scientific reasons, like shifts in rain patterns, that are influencing what happens. ;o)

Quoting Levi32:


I wish we could get all the old-timers "wives tales" about hurricane signs all collected in one place. A lot of them actually can be taken seriously.

Where do you live? And do you know anything about what mangos were doing in recent years? Like if they predicted no hurricane landfalls last year.
Well, mango blossom season is usually more end of March than Feb; usually the trees are still covered around this time, but this year they are already done. Last year we had a double-flowering. The trees went back to blossoming after there were already small to middle-sized fruit on most of them. That was weird - doesn't happen often from my recollection.

And indianrivguy, I can see some correlations between temps and volume of blossom, but I don't know if it's more temps or more rainfall that affects timing....

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Quoting Greyelf:


LOL...here come the ant and turtle discussions. :)


Better than GW!

Nice to see you Greyelf.
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Quoting stormwatcherCI:
I have been hearing older folks saying lately that the early mango season is a sign for a bad hurricane season down here. Mangoes all over the place now.


don't buy into that being an indicator. Mangos originally came from a higher altitude and are eccentric in producing crops. Cold, but not freezing weather seems to bring on a large bloom and as we had some this winter, that is likely, IMO, the cause. Don't know how interested you are in Mangos, but here is a very good article on their history; From Tequesta Magazine 1956
Mango growing in early Miami
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Quoting Greyelf:


LOL...here come the ant and turtle discussions. :)


Hey I find such things fascinating :) You know they had to have had ways of knowing if a dangerous summer was on the way before they had satellites.
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26701
Quoting Levi32:


I wish we could get all the old-timers "wives tales" about hurricane signs all collected in one place. A lot of them actually can be taken seriously.

Where do you live? And do you know anything about what mangos were doing in recent years? Like if they predicted no hurricane landfalls last year.


LOL...here come the ant and turtle discussions. :)
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Quoting stormwatcherCI:
I have been hearing older folks saying lately that the early mango season is a sign for a bad hurricane season down here. Mangoes all over the place now.


I wish we could get all the old-timers "wives tales" about hurricane signs all collected in one place. A lot of them actually can be taken seriously.

Where do you live? And do you know anything about what mangos were doing in recent years? Like if they predicted no hurricane landfalls last year.
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26701
Quoting BahaHurican:
Yeah. This is pretty ideal weather here - daytime temps around 80, nights around 70 - it's been a while since we've had a pattern this cool going into Apr. Some years we've had a front go through, but normally we are up to mid-80s on a daily basis by mid-April. I'm enjoying it while it's here and looking to hurricane preps for later this year. We had extra-early mango blossoming here, which goes along w/ the more empirical signs of a busy season between 15 and 30 N.....
I have been hearing older folks saying lately that the early mango season is a sign for a bad hurricane season down here. Mangoes all over the place now.
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Quoting Levi32:


He doesn't like me, if you haven't noticed over the past couple weeks.


really? couldnt tell ;)
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360
Quoting tornadodude:
geeze bappit lol

wrong side of the bed or?


He doesn't like me, if you haven't noticed over the past couple weeks.
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26701
geeze bappit lol

wrong side of the bed or?
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360
Bappit, go ahead and keep talking lol....

It's amusing.
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26701
Quoting Levi32:


Yes definitely minus the GW talk. I'm glad you feel that way.


One way to contribute to the solution is not to be part of the problem.
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Alright.. I'm going to take the info provided via this blog, ENSO data, experience blogger info's, ect and try to get a basic consensus of what might the 2010 Hurricane Season be like.

El Nino gone by early season (already at the moderate/weak threshold)La Nina by mid-late season, albeit a weak one. Above average temps in the MDR, higher than 2005 even and higher TCHP in the Caribbean this time of year than in 2005 should be a huge contributing factor on the strength and intensity of the systems. Below Average SST's due to cold weather in the South-east CONUS will most likely return to average maybe even slight above average, although it most likely wont be as warm as last year unless we get a hotter than average summer.

Sticking with 15/7/4 for the season. Hoping for a trough year with all the storms going out to sea.
Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 24580
Great graphic showing the ECMWF's improving skill in medium-range forecasts for the northern hemisphere over the years.

Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26701
Quoting bappit:
Quoting StormW:
For those interested:

NATIONAL HURRICANE CONFERENCE, DAY 3

SLOSH WEBPAGE

Quoting Levi
Already read it, thanks for keeping us updated Storm :)

Since you are not interested, I guess StormW didn not post it for you, but thank you for keeping us updated.


Why would I be not be interested if I read it LOL.

FYI he posted the blog 7 minutes before posting it here, so I had already had plenty of time to read it. Goodness...
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26701
Thanks for the April Fool's chuckle, Dr M!
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Quoting StormW:
For those interested:

NATIONAL HURRICANE CONFERENCE, DAY 3

SLOSH WEBPAGE

Quoting Levi
Already read it, thanks for keeping us updated Storm :)

Since you are not interested, I guess StormW didn not post it for you, but thank you for keeping us updated.
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Quoting Jeff9641:


Hey Levi, Look at the above average temps over the next couple weeks in the Eastern US. Orlando is forecasted to stay 85 to 90 for atleast 8 to 9 days if not longer.

http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/610day/


Yup. The European ensembles keep a nice mean ridge over the east for the next 10 days. The cold coastal shelf waters will start to rapidly warm up with this. It will only really take a couple weeks of hot spring temps to bring the gulf back up to normal.



8-10 day ECMWF/GFS comparison:

Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26701
Quoting StormW:
For those interested:

NATIONAL HURRICANE CONFERENCE, DAY 3

SLOSH WEBPAGE


Already read it, thanks for keeping us updated Storm :)
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26701
BBL, ya'll....
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ONly for the now. By June temps in the area are very likely to pretty much on par with other seasons...
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Quoting winter123:


I saw that, but it's still possible. What those colder temps will do is keep storms from bombing right near the US coast, right?


Well unfortunately the Loop Current and the Gulf Stream will warm the U.S. coastal waters right up during the next 2 months. What the cold water to the north does is promotes net subsidence during the summer months and therefore helps focus heat and convergence to the south over the deep tropics. This is actually better for the hurricane season than if the entire Atlantic Ocean was warmer than normal.

From my blog...this was the EUROSIP February model forecast for May-June-July.

Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26701
Quoting tornadodude:


either way its so nice out
Yeah. This is pretty ideal weather here - daytime temps around 80, nights around 70 - it's been a while since we've had a pattern this cool going into Apr. Some years we've had a front go through, but normally we are up to mid-80s on a daily basis by mid-April. I'm enjoying it while it's here and looking to hurricane preps for later this year. We had extra-early mango blossoming here, which goes along w/ the more empirical signs of a busy season between 15 and 30 N.....
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Quoting Levi32:


But look at how warm the waters of the subtropical Atlantic around 30N were in 2003 when Ana formed. They are bone-chilly this year. Also, Ana was the first-ever recorded April tropical cyclone in the North Atlantic. It's quite rare. April was the last month of the calender year to get a named storm.

2003 mid-April when Ana formed



Now:





I saw that, but it's still possible. What those colder temps will do is keep storms from bombing right near the US coast, right?
Member Since: July 29, 2006 Posts: 28 Comments: 1802
Quoting winter123:


We had one there in 2003, I think, in mid april. So I always watch for it because it's very possible


But look at how warm the waters of the subtropical Atlantic around 30N were in 2003 when Ana formed. They are bone-chilly this year. Also, Ana was the first-ever recorded April tropical cyclone in the North Atlantic. It's quite rare. April was the last month of the calender year to get a named storm.

2003 mid-April when Ana formed



Now:



Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26701
Quoting BahaHurican:
Hmmm..... Warmer than Nassau Bahamas right now. We've only got 77 right now...


either way its so nice out
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360
Quoting Levi32:


That's because SSTs are way down at 16-18C out there.



We had one there in 2003, I think, in mid april. So I always watch for it because it's very possible
Member Since: July 29, 2006 Posts: 28 Comments: 1802
A late cold front will move thru Puerto Rico tommorow bringing some showers.It has been above normal in terms of the totals of rainfall on 2010 in San Juan as 15.23 inches has fallen as previous fronts made it here and stalled.
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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