Globe has 2nd or 6th warmest February on record; Fiji hard-hit by Tomas

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 12:51 PM GMT on March 18, 2010

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The globe recorded its sixth warmest February since record keeping began in 1880, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) National Climatic Data Center. NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies rated February 2010 the second warmest, behind 1998. The year-to-date period, January - February, is the 5th or 2nd warmest such period on record, according to NOAA and NASA, respectively. NOAA rated February 2010 global ocean temperatures as the 2nd warmest on record, next to 1998. February land temperatures in the Southern Hemisphere were the warmest on record, but in the Northern Hemisphere, they were the 26th warmest. The relatively cool Northern Hemisphere land temperatures were due in part to the much-above average amount of snow on the ground--February 2010 snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere was the 3rd highest in the 44-year snow cover record. For the entire winter, the Northern Hemisphere had the 2nd greatest snow cover on record, the U.S. had its greatest snow cover, and Eurasia had its 4th most.


Figure 1. departure of surface temperature from average for the globe during February 2010. Image credit: National Climatic Data Center.

Global satellite-measured temperatures for the lowest 8 km of the atmosphere were the second warmest on record in February, according to both the University of Alabama Huntsville (UAH) and Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) groups. Both groups also rated the winter of 2009 - 2010 the 2nd warmest winter on record. The record warmest February and winter occurred 1998.

Moderate El Niño conditions continue
Moderate El Niño conditions continue over the tropical Eastern Pacific. Ocean temperatures in the area 5°N - 5°S, 120°W - 170°W, also called the "Niña 3.4 region", were at 1.2°C above average--in the middle of the 1.0°C - 1.5°C range for a moderate El Niño--on March 14, 2010, according to the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. The strength of El Niño has been roughly constant for all of February and the first two weeks of March. Anomalously strong westerly winds along the Equator that have helped maintain the current El Niño have weakened since March 1, but are probably strong enough to maintain the current moderate El Niño conditions through mid-April. Some slow weakening of El Niño is likely beginning in early April. It is highly uncertain what may happen to El Niño at that point, with the models split between predicting a weak El Niño, neutral conditions, or a La Niña by the height of hurricane season (August-September-October). It's worth noting that the last time we had a strong El Niño--the record-strength 1997 - 1998 event--El Niño conditions collapsed suddenly in May 1998, and a La Niña event rapidly developed during the summer of 1998. A similar chain of events is possible this year, as well. However, the El Niño of 1986 - 1987 maintained moderate strength through two consecutive hurricane seasons, and it is possible that this year's El Niño could pull a similar feat. We simply don't have the predictive skill to say what might happen to El Niño this summer.

February sea ice extent in the Arctic 4th lowest on record
February 2010 Northern Hemisphere sea ice extent was the 4th lowest since satellite measurements began in 1979. Ice extent was lower than in 2009 and 2008, but greater than in 2005, 2006, and 2007, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). The weather pattern over the Arctic during much of February 2010 featured a strongly negative Arctic Oscillation (AO). This pattern tends to slow the winds that typically flush large amounts of sea ice out of the Arctic between Greenland and Iceland. In this way, a negative AO could help retain some the second- and third-year ice through the winter, and potentially rebuild some of the older, multi-year ice that has been lost over the past few years.

Heavy damage on Fiji from Tropical Cyclone Tomas
Communications are still out to most of the islands in the Fiji devastated by Tropical Cyclone Tomas, but it is apparent that the Category 3 storm caused "overwhelming damage" to the islands that received a direct hit, according to the Associated Press. Tomas, packing winds of up to 130 mph (205 kph) at its center, hit Fiji beginning late Friday. The Lau and Lomaiviti island groups and the northern coast of the second biggest island, Vanua Levu, took the brunt of the storm. Only one death has been reported thus far. Initial reports said 1500 homes were destroyed or damaged and up to 50 percent of facilities in the Lau Group were affected.

I'll have a new post on Friday, when I plan to discuss why the Red River at Fargo, ND is now experiencing a "10-year flood" once every 2.5 years, on average.

Jeff Masters

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Hurricane Gustav makes landfall around 5 a.m. Sept. 1, 2008.



Experts say storm modeling needs improvement

By Nikki Buskey
Staff Writer

Published: Wednesday, March 17, 2010 at 1:00 p.m.
Last Modified: Wednesday, March 17, 2010 at 1:28 p.m.

( page 1 of 3 )

BATON ROUGE

During hurricanes and tropical storms, surge predictions can vary in accuracy, and just a few feet can make a big difference for communities like Terrebonne and Lafourche.

Related Links:

* Coastal groups urge elevation and relocation
* Information essential for planning
* Researchers: Data belies flood risk
* Forecasters to use new way to predict hurricane's punch
* Coastal official says federal interest in restoration improving
* Could a quake hit here? Some already have
* New levees will be tested by encroaching Gulf

A day before Hurricane Ike struck Terrebonne and Lafourche in 2008, storm-surge predictions varied from 5 to 8 feet for Terrebonne.

The actual surge was closer to 10 feet, which overtopped all of the community's levees.

Storm surge accounts for 90 percent of deaths during hurricanes and has done extensive damage to the Louisiana coast. A National Hurricane Center scientist said Tuesday that the ability to accurately predict storm surge needs to improve so the threat can be efficiently communicated to coastal communities.

Jamie Rhome, a storm-surge specialist with the National Hurricane Center, spoke at the 2010 Central Gulf of Mexico Hurricane Conference in Baton Rouge. The two-day conference brings together federal hurricane experts, academics, emergency officials and local government representatives to discuss issues facing the state during the next hurricane season.

Among local officials attending were Terrebonne Levee Director Reggie Dupre, South Lafourche Levee Director Windell Curole, North Lafourche Levee Manager Dwayne Bourgeois and Terrebonne Emergency Director Earl Eues.

When local emergency officials call me, they want to know: How much water will there be? When will it come and when will it leave? What will the impacts be to my area? And how should I respond? Rhome said.

Those may seem like basic questions, but exactly how to get those answers is still being studied, Rhome said. Various agencies are working to factor tides and waves into the models they run to predict storm-surge risks.

The National Weather Service now includes predictions of storm surge in its hurricane warnings, but Rhome said they've proved hard for the average citizen to understand.

That's because the predictions don't take into consideration the height of the tide during flooding or the size of waves that a storm could produce. Local emergency officials are left to calculate for themselves how those factors could increase flooding risks.

The National Weather Service also didn't subtract land elevations from their predictions, which could cause confusion for lay people looking at the information, Rhome said. A hurricane prediction might say that Houma will experience 10 to 12 feet of storm surge, which sounds dire. But to get a more accurate forecast, you would need to subtract the elevation above sea level of your home or business. If the building sits at 10 feet above sea level, for example, you might see little to no water at all.

Rhome said that percent of the calls he receives are related to that confusion.

Terrebonne Emergency Preparedness Director Earl Eues said during hurricanes Gustav and Ike the parish began using computer models of storm surge adjusted for elevation because they're much easier for the general person to understand.

Joseph Suhayda, a storm-surge modeler working with Louisiana State University, said scientists are working to better determine how landscape features like roads, barrier islands, marshes and levees influence storm-surge flooding.

Officials had suggested in the past that every 2.7 square feet of marsh would knock down storm surge by 1 foot. We now know that's not true, Suhayda said.

He added that open basins will allow floodwaters to disperse better, and if levees are constructed across basins, the fact that floodwaters will pile up against them needs to be taken into account.

Once the Morganza-to-the-Gulf hurricane-protection system is built across Terrebonne, for example, it will likely cause floodwaters to be piled up against the vulnerable west side of south Lafourche's Larose-to-Golden Meadow levee system.

South Lafourche is in the process of raising the southwest side of that system to 14 feet.

Rhome said that with more and more people relocating to coastal areas, there's a bigger push than ever before to better predict storm surge.

Between 1980 and 2003, population density in coastal areas has gone up 28 percent. Seventy-two percent of the nations ports, 27 percent of major roads and 9 percent of major railways are at or below 4 feet above sea level. That's a height very much at risk of major flooding.

That's over half of our economic productivity located in the coastal zone, Rhome said.This is not just a social issue; it's an economic issue.

Nikki Buskey can be reached at 857-2205 or nicole.buskey@houmatoday.com.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 420 Comments: 127536
268. xcool
El Nino Rebound Seasons
by Stu Ostro, Senior Meteorologist , on Mar 18, 2010 5:29 pm ET
I thought I'd check the conventional wisdom that "El Nino rebound" hurricane seasons in the Atlantic basin are particularly dangerous. A quick historical look seems to support that.

First, the requisite caveats:

--I only quickly double-checked the statistics, and even if all of them are correct this is a cursory glance rather than a rigorous scientific analysis.

--Although the current El Nino is expected to wane as we head toward and through the hurricane season, there is uncertainty in what the "ENSO" situation will be.

Those having been stated ...

Below is a list of years in which, according to NOAA's data, El Nino was present the previous winter but was gone by the peak of the hurricane season, replaced by either neutral conditions or La Nina.

Some highlights:

12 of 13 seasons -- all of them except for one (1973) -- included hurricanes which produced significant damage.

I've selected some events (in red) which were particularly extreme, destructive, and/or unusual. Of the 13 seasons, 10 had such events, in some cases multiple ones. While that means that nearly 25% of those seasons did not, we're on a streak of the most recent 7 in a row having them (though note that not all of those events were in the U.S.).

In terms of the total number of storms/hurricanes/majors, the averages of these seasons are above the average of all the seasons.

At a glance, there doesn%u2019t seem to be much of a correlation between the strength of El Nino the previous winter and the outcome of the Atlantic hurricane season.

In addition to the El Nino factor, there's something else out there of note. In fact, it's stunning.

I've always been a bit skeptical of the importance of Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in how active a hurricane season ends up being -- not that they don't play a role, just that there are other crucial elements that don't always seem to be given enough credit, such as the atmospheric circulation pattern in mid-latitudes during the season. Nevertheless, in some years there has been a correlation between preseason SSTs in the TNA (Tropical North Atlantic) region and what happens during the season. And so far in 2010 not only has the water in that region been warm, but January's value set a record departure above average for any month in the historical record.

The graph below shows the recent meteoric spike (which as can be seen more clearly on another graph represents a huge turnaround from this time last year), and below that is how the warm water shows up on a map.

We'll have to see whether that extreme anomaly continues, and if El Nino ends, and if so exactly what that means for any given location in the upcoming Atlantic hurricane season (the devil is in the details), but the upshot of all this stuff is: Current signs point to a much different outcome in 2010 than in 2009, and in case this season follows in the footsteps of other recent El Nio rebound ones, people ought to not let last year's quietude lead to complacency.


Link
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Grace was the Furthest East to form,and North

Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 420 Comments: 127536
Claudette and Ida were the Farthest West a System came in the Atlantic and made landfall last year.



Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 420 Comments: 127536
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 420 Comments: 127536
Quoting Levi32:


Atmo, not many people realize we've had a named storm in the month of May for the last 3 years in a row, so if 2009 had one, I wouldn't call another one this year a big anomaly. Now if we make this year the 4th in a row to have a May storm, that could be considered an anomaly, so it would be both an anomaly and not at the same time...lol.

Equivalent of rolling an odd number on a die 4 times in a row .. each individual roll is 50/50 .. a string? that's unlikely and an anomaly :)
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I think we'll get a storm before June 1.
Member Since: September 9, 2008 Posts: 6 Comments: 3414
Quoting atmoaggie:
Our favorite west FL/Gulf buoy way out in the gulf stream did reach 27 C (~ 81 F) by May 15 last year. So, yeah, 80 degree water temps...I'll buy that. A May storm? Ehh, that would be quite an anomaly.

Buoy 42003: (this one) http://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/station_page.php?station=42003

2009 archive at: (scroll, scroll, scroll) http://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/view_text_file.php?filename=42003h2009.txt.gz&dir=data/historical/stdm et/

Though, all of this makes me wonder about Audrey. The Gulf must have been good and warm in 1957 when a cat 4 spun up and hit SW LA on June 27.


Atmo, not many people realize we've had a named storm in the month of May for the last 3 years in a row, so if 2009 had one, I wouldn't call another one this year a big anomaly. Now if we make this year the 4th in a row to have a May storm, that could be considered an anomaly, so it would be both an anomaly and not at the same time...lol.
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26547
Quoting atmoaggie:

That fits with the teleconnections in the studies that say the Caribbean gets an anomalously wet May/June rainy season during a strong El Nino's decline.

Wonder what, if any, effect it will have on the normal progression of SST there...assuming that extra wet rainy season comes with extra clouds and/or wind.


Oh I doubt it will be a problem. All a rainy May does is foreshadow a bad hurricane season when there's a dying El Nino. The Caribbean is warm enough to support minimal hurricanes year-round. Besides, the models that are forecasting above-normal precipitation there all spring and summer long are also forecasting above-normal SSTs throughout the summer.
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26547
Quoting Minnemike:

I am thankful we're worried about a gas with such low atmospheric concentration and greenhouse impact. We would be talking about cataclysmic warming otherwise. Instead, we are talking about the kind of warming that won't destroy our species, but will certainly impact our way of life, and the lives of countless species worldwide, many of which we depend on. I just think it's a fallacy being communicated to down play CO2 using atmospheric concentration and greenhouse impact figures. Just because a number is small, it doesn't amount to even a hill of beans if it's out of context.


I am glad that we are studying it, too.

I don't agree with the impacts, though. Species adapt. Not just ours. If you have a steep change over a sustained period of time, I'd agree, but the Earth has never seen that kind of change, other than going into or out of an ice age.

Slow increases in temp over time won't affect anyone's way of life.

Theory and predictions have been put out there. So far, the observations do not support it.

btw, can anyone get me the IPCC model run data results? All of them. Have one, but would like to validate them all.

Have until January to get it done. Monthly data doesn't help in the overall picture for validation.

Below is 2000-2009 IPCC vs. actual validation (cold in the 80's). And, the more data we get, the less that green line will move. Will be very hard to validate after 10 or so more years. I am watching and waiting to see how observations match with predictions. So far, not so good. And that's the long term trend-line, from 1979 (sat era).




Below is just from 2000 (prediction point) forward.



Again, would love all of the actual IPCC model results if anyone can provide or show me where. I've looked and found only one.
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Link
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Hi guys
check it out



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Quoting Patrap:
I'll have a new post on Friday, when I plan to discuss why the Red River at Fargo, ND is now experiencing a "10-year flood" once every 2.5 years, on average.

Jeff Masters



Should be a interesting read as per usual,and Im sure some folks will be banging their heads on some Keyboards over the data.

"Snicker,ack,coff"..

LOL

Yep. Droughts are more frequent.
Snicker,
Ack,
Cough.
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Our favorite west FL/Gulf buoy way out in the gulf stream did reach 27 C (~ 81 F) by May 15 last year. So, yeah, 80 degree water temps...I'll buy that. A May storm? Ehh, that would be quite an anomaly.

Buoy 42003: (this one) http://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/station_page.php?station=42003

2009 archive at: (scroll, scroll, scroll) http://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/view_text_file.php?filename=42003h2009.txt.gz&dir=data/historical/stdmet/

Though, all of this makes me wonder about Audrey. The Gulf must have been good and warm in 1957 when a cat 4 spun up and hit SW LA on June 27.
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Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
how do ya think i feel we are going from near 70 degrees for like a week now to near 30 degrees on sunday evening for highs with lows on mon and tus in the mid 20's all the trees are budding here with spring flowers popin up even the chinese apple tree is starting to bloom you could see the blooms even though they are small in the highlight of the setting sun today shame the cold is gonna kill off that early growth but nature can be cruel sometimes and we have nothing to say about it just deal with it


The upside-down winter goes on...winter arrives just as spring does.
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2010 Atlantic Hurricane Names

Alex
Bonnie
Colin
Danielle
Earl
Fiona
Gaston
Hermine
Igor
Julia
Karl
Lisa
Matthew
Nicole
Otto
Paula
Richard
Shary
Tomas
Virginie
Walter

Colin,Fiona,Julia,Igor..replaces Charley,Frances,Jeanne,and Ivan the Terrible from the 2004 Season
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 420 Comments: 127536
I'll have a new post on Friday, when I plan to discuss why the Red River at Fargo, ND is now experiencing a "10-year flood" once every 2.5 years, on average.

Jeff Masters



Should be a interesting read as per usual,and Im sure some folks will be banging their heads on some Keyboards over the data.

"Snicker,ack,coff"..

LOL
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 420 Comments: 127536
Quoting atmoaggie:

Problem is, we have no confidence in the climate models. Sure, they have been tuned to try to simulate the observed, past, conditions, but the physics of the feedbacks and natural cycle teleconnections are full of assumptions at this point.

A similarity to what I do. I can tune a storm surge model to give a result matching observations during Ike by turning up or down wind speed in select locations and ignoring that the assumptions about sea bottom friction could be wrong. I'll have a perfect hindcast result. And the sea bottom friction (just to name one parameter) would be very similar to the forcings of the teleconnections and feedbacks in the climate models.

BUT, would you use that model with that tuned setup to stay home or evacuate for a new storm with that model running in forecast mode? Or decide where to position an emergency operations center? Or base flood map zones off of that model setup? Of course not.

(aside from evacuating low lying areas for the sake of caution)


I always refer to my best judgement and Local Emg Mgt folks.

Always.

Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 420 Comments: 127536
Approaching near normal values is actually quite inline with what Atmo said ... He was refuting the likelihood of a may gulf storm, never did he say temps would be very different from normal.
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Might want to change the altar you worship at.
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Quoting Jeff9641:
I'm going on a limb and saying we will have our first system affect the west coast of FL in May. A couple weeks of 90 degree days will send the gulf waters quickly toward 80. Those 90 degree days will starting coming frequently in April for FL.


May. We still get nights in 50s sometimes in May in SE LA. Hard to warm a Gulf of Mexico beyond the mean daily temperature that quick when it is starting out so cold.

Mean temperature for NOLA for May 2009: 76 F
Same for Tampa: 81 F. And Tampa didn't see 90 F for a solid 2 weeks in May, 2009...in the second half of the month. (IIRC, I don't think last Spring was anomalously cool.)

In addition, you can expect the gulf to lag behind the mean surface temps a little.
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Quoting altesticstorm10:

That won't cool down the Gulf again?
i don't think he said it will cool down the gulf
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It appears that snow will be on tap for Northern Texas on Saturday. An upper level low will track eastward behind the cyclogenesis of a low pressure system tracking over northern Texas. This upper low with act to decrease heights lower thickness values enough to support snow. The GFS shows 1000mb-7000mb thickness values around 281dm. Surface temperatures during the event appear to be around the mid 30s so expecting a wet snow which will have difficulty accumulating, especially considering the rainfall amounts before the arrival of the snow.
The GFS 12z Bufkit shows the dendritic growth zone around 11000-12000ft with no mid omega forcing. Given the lack of dynamics in the mid and upper levels and above freezing surface temps, I see snow to liquid ratios around 8:1. I am forecasting for around 1 inch of snow in the Dallas and Fort Worth area and 1-3 inches possible closer to the Texas/Oklahoma Border.
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Quoting Patrap:
I'd maybe check the Long,Long Range Climate modeling scenario's and see what they say.


The Global wide Science Experiment is way under way now,a Century and a fourscore at least.


But most wont like the modeling result's..No Sir.


Problem is, we have no confidence in the climate models. Sure, they have been tuned to try to simulate the observed, past, conditions, but the physics of the feedbacks and natural cycle teleconnections are full of assumptions at this point.

A similarity to what I do. I can tune a storm surge model to give a result matching observations during Ike by turning up or down wind speed in select locations and ignoring that the assumptions about sea bottom friction could be wrong. I'll have a perfect hindcast result. And the sea bottom friction (just to name one parameter) would be very similar to the forcings of the teleconnections and feedbacks in the climate models.

BUT, would you use that model with that tuned setup to stay home or evacuate for a new storm with that model running in forecast mode? Or decide where to position an emergency operations center? Or base flood map zones off of that model setup? Of course not.

(aside from evacuating low lying areas for the sake of caution)
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Quoting Levi32:


You may get a scattered shower or two develop over the mountains there, but I'm afraid Hispaniola and PR are getting the most of this. Another chance may come in 4-5 days as a nor'easter drops the tail of a front down into the NW Caribbean.

Your drought conditions will start to improve and reverse as the El Nino dies this spring. Most of the models have you going into highly above-normal precipitation as early as April, and certainly by May.


That fits with the teleconnections in the studies that say the Caribbean gets an anomalously wet May/June rainy season during a strong El Nino's decline.

Wonder what, if any, effect it will have on the normal progression of SST there...assuming that extra wet rainy season comes with extra clouds and/or wind.
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New planet, CoRoT-9b?


http://www.ia.ucsb.edu/pa/display.aspx?pkey=2204

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Quoting help4u:
AMEN!!!!!!!!!!!!!APOCALYPSE-INDUCED MISANTHROPIC ENVIRONMENTAL NERVOUSNESS!!!
sorry no help4u
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Quoting altesticstorm10:

March 17, 2010 (Record Atlantic SSTs, breaking 2005)


March 17, 2005 (Ex-Record Atlantic SSTs, broken by 2010)


Except for a rather small disparity in the Gulf and Bahamas and that small cool pool in the Caribbean, 2010 > 2005 by a long shot.
it will be what it will be best be ready to deal with what ever nature is preping up to be
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AMEN!!!!!!!!!!!!!APOCALYPSE-INDUCED MISANTHROPIC ENVIRONMENTAL NERVOUSNESS!!!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I'd maybe check the Long,Long Range Climate modeling scenario's and see what they say.


The Global wide Science Experiment is way under way now,a Century and a fourscore at least.


But most wont like the modeling result's..No Sir.

Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 420 Comments: 127536
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 420 Comments: 127536
Quoting Bordonaro:


As the Earth slowly warms, crazier and crazier weather patterns will emerge, and possibly become our "new normal"!!

Or maybe, even, back to "normal"...
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Ran across this Darwin Award Winner and thought I'd share.
Member Since: September 9, 2008 Posts: 6 Comments: 3414
Quoting Bordonaro:


As the Earth slowly warms, crazier and crazier weather patterns will emerge, and possibly become our "new normal"!!
or "new abnormal"
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Quoting Bordonaro:


I am sure Hugh is pretty smart! I feel bad that the changing weather is going to cut into how he earns his livelihood!

Hopefully, he will be able to get himself a regular long-haul trucking job!
naw they will put mudders on'em and call it mud truckin on melted perma frost tonight at nine

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PRIORITY
TROPICAL CYCLONE ADVICE NUMBER 5
Issued by the Bureau of Meteorology, Brisbane
Issued at 10:52am EST on Friday the 19th of March 2010

A Cyclone WATCH has been declared for coastal areas from Cardwell to Yeppoon.

At 10:00 am EST Tropical Cyclone Ului, Category 2 was estimated to be
950 kilometres east northeast of Mackay and
1100 kilometres east northeast of Townsville and
moving southwest at 13 kilometres per hour.

Tropical Cyclone Ului has weakened to category two intensity this morning and is
now moving to the southwest towards the Queensland coast.

It now appears unlikely that the cyclone will reintensify. The most likely
scenario is for the cyclone to cross the coast Sunday morning between Cardwell
and Mackay and it may remain at category 2 intensity by landfall.

Damaging winds should develop between Cardwell and Yeppoon later on Saturday,
then increase further Sunday morning as the cyclone nears the coast.

Seas and swell are expected to increase along much of the Queensland east coast.
Dangerous surf conditions are expected to develop about exposed beaches south of
the cyclone later today. A separate Severe Weather Warning is current for these
conditions.

People between Cardwell and Yeppoon should consider what action they will need
to take if the cyclone threat increases.
- Information is available from your local government
- For cyclone preparedness and safety advice, visit Queensland's Disaster
Management Services
website [www.disaster.qld.gov.au].
- For emergency assistance call the Queensland State Emergency Service [SES] on
132 500 [for assistance with storm damage, rising flood water, fallen trees on
buildings or roof damage]

Details of Tropical Cyclone Ului at 10:00 am EST:
.Centre located near...... 16.7 degrees South 156.9 degrees East
.Location accuracy........ within 30 kilometres
.Recent movement.......... towards the southwest at 13 kilometres per hour
.Wind gusts near centre... 155 kilometres per hour
.Severity category........ 2
.Central pressure......... 980 hectoPascals

Please ensure that neighbours have heard and understood this message,
particularly new arrivals or those who may not fully understand English.

The next advice will be issued by 5:00 pm EST Friday 19 March.

Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15932
Quoting Chicklit:
Are you implying that Hugh is illiterate and doesn't read? Even if he doesn't, Hugh must think somepun's up because his road's got melted away. Go on. Get me started. It's thursday and I'm irish. Oh sorry, it's cold. Got to take a hot bath break. Will take a rain check on that. Really, bye now, wunderblogfolk.


I am sure Hugh is pretty smart! I feel bad that the changing weather is going to cut into how he earns his livelihood!

Hopefully, he will be able to get himself a regular long-haul trucking job!
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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