Record warmth in Atlantic Main Development Region for hurricanes

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 4:52 PM GMT on March 08, 2010

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Sea Surface Temperatures (SSTs) in the Atlantic's Main Development Region for hurricanes were at their highest February level on record last month, according to an analysis of historical SST data from the UK Hadley Center. SST data goes back to 1850, though there is much missing data before 1910 and during WWI and WWII. The region between 10°N and 20°N, between the coast of Africa and Central America, is called the Main Development Region (MDR) because virtually all African waves originate in this region. These African waves account for 85% of all Atlantic major hurricanes and 60% of all named storms. When SSTs in the MDR are much above average during hurricane season, a very active season typically results (if there is no El Niño event present.)


Figure 1. The departure of sea surface temperature (SST) from average for March 7, 2010, as derived from the AMSR and AVHRR satellite data. Image credit: NOAA.

SSTs in the Main Development Region (10°N to 20°N and 20°W to 85°W) were an eye-opening 1.02°C above average during February. This easily beats the previous record of 0.83°C set in 1998. SSTs in the Main Development Region are already warmer than they were during June of last year, which is pretty remarkable, considering February is usually the coldest month of the year for SSTs in the North Atlantic. The 1.02°C anomaly is the 6th highest monthly SST anomaly for the MDR on record. The only other months with higher anomalies all occurred during 2005 (April, May, June, July, and September 2005 had anomalies of 1.06°C - 1.23°C).

What is responsible for the high SSTs?
Don't blame El Niño for the high Atlantic SSTs. El Niño is a warming of the Pacific waters near the Equator, and has no direct impact on Atlantic SSTs. Instead, blame the Arctic Oscillation (AO) or its close cousin, the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The AO and NAO are climate patterns in the North Atlantic Ocean related to fluctuations in the difference of sea-level pressure between the Icelandic Low and the Azores-Bermuda High. They are some of the oldest known climate oscillations; seafaring Scandinavians described the pattern several centuries ago. Through east-west oscillation motions of the Icelandic Low and the Azores-Bermuda High, the AO/NAO controls the strength and direction of westerly winds and storm tracks across the North Atlantic. A large difference in the pressure between Iceland and the Azores (positive NAO) leads to increased westerly winds and mild and wet winters in Europe. Positive NAO conditions also cause the Icelandic Low to draw a stronger south-westerly flow of air over eastern North America, preventing Arctic air from plunging southward. In contrast, if the difference in sea-level pressure between Iceland and the Azores is small (negative NAO), westerly winds are suppressed, allowing Arctic air to spill southwards into eastern North America more readily. The winter of 2009 - 2010 has seen the most negative AO and NAO patterns since record keeping began in 1950, which caused a very cold winter in Florida and surrounding states. A negative AO/NAO implies a very weak Azores-Bermuda High, which reduces the trade winds circulating around the High. During December - February, trade winds between Africa and the Lesser Antilles Islands in the hurricane Main Development Region were 1 - 2 m/s (2.2 - 4.5 mph) below average (Figure 2). Slower trade winds mean less mixing of the surface waters with cooler waters down deep, plus less evaporational cooling of the surface water. As a result, the ocean has heated up significantly, relative to normal, over the winter. This heating is superimposed on the very warm global SSTs we've been seeing over the past decade, leading to the current record warmth. Global and Northern Hemisphere SSTs were the 2nd warmest on record in both December and January.


Figure 2. Sea level pressure averaged for the period December 2009 - February 2010 (left) and the sea level pressure averaged for the period December - February from the long-term mean (1968 - 1998). This winter, the Azores-Bermuda High was about 3 - 4 mb weaker than in a typical winter, due to strongly negative AO/NAO conditions. Image credit: NOAA/ESRL.


Figure 3. Departure of surface wind speed from average for December 2009 - February 2010. Winds were about 1 - 2 m/s (2.2 - 4.5 mph) lower than average over the Atlantic hurricane Main Development Region (MDR). Image credit: NOAA/ESRL.

What does this imply for the coming hurricane season?
According to Dr. Phil Klotzbach of the University of Colorado, February temperatures in the MDR are not strongly correlated with active hurricane seasons. The mathematical correlation between hurricane season Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) and February SSTs is only 0.26, which is considered weak. Past hurricane seasons that had high February SST anomalies include 1998 (0.83°C anomaly), 2007 (0.71°C anomaly), and 1958 (0.68°C anomaly). These three years averaged 13 named storms, 8 hurricanes, and 3 intense hurricanes, which is considerably higher than the average of 10, 6, and 2. The big question is, how long will the strong negative AO/NAO conditions keep the Azores-Bermuda High weak? Well, the AO has risen to near-neutral values over the past week, and the latest 2-week forecast from the GFS model show that the AO and NAO will not be as strongly negative during March. This should allow the Azores-Bermuda High to strengthen some this month and increase the trade winds over the MDR. However, I still expect we'll set a record for warmest-ever March SSTs in the Main Development Region. Longer term, the crystal ball is very fuzzy, as our ability to predict the weather months in advance is poor. The long-range NOAA CFS model is predicting SSTs in the Atlantic MDR will be about 0.70°C above average during the peak months of hurricane season, making it one of the top five warmest years on record--but not as warm as the unbelievable Hurricane Season of 2005, which averaged 0.95°C above normal during August - October. The other big question is, when will El Niño fade? El Niño is currently holding steady at moderate intensity, and I expect that will continue through at least mid-April. It is possible El Niño will linger long enough into the year that it will create increased wind shear that will suppress this year's hurricane season.

Brazilian disturbance
An area of disturbed weather off the coast of Brazil, near 24S 36W, has changed little over the past two days. This disturbance still has a slight potential to develop into subtropical or tropical depression by Wednesday, according to the latest runs of the ECMWF, GFS, and NOGAPS models. Satellite imagery shows little organization to the cloud pattern, and only limited heavy thunderstorm activity. Wind shear over the region is about 20 knots, which is rather high, and should keep any development slow. Sea surface temperatures are about 27°C, about 1°C above average, which is warm enough to support a tropical storm. The system is small, limiting its potential to become a tropical cyclone. I don't think it will become a subtropical depression.

I'll have a new post on Wednesday.
Jeff Masters

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Quoting StormW:


No.

StormW, you talk too much. A nice, simple answer would have been enough, but, noooo, you have to go on and on...
Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 6 Comments: 12461
isnt there a 90Q and 90L?

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I've seen the invest labeled both at 90L and 90Q. Which one is the proper classification?
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Quoting atmoaggie:

Okay. I'll take winter, gladly. Can we make it last a little longer?

My miserable meter is an exponential function of temps once they are above 80 F.


I don't even turn on the AC until the temp and humidity both hit 90 consisitenly. And yes, I live for the outdoors.

I can deal with the cold too, but I save that for out of season camping/hiking and travel.
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double post... 'scuse me...
Member Since: June 20, 2005 Posts: 22 Comments: 1050
Quoting Chicklit:

Pinellas isn't where there was a town affected by hurricanes that wasn't a city so it didn't qualify for any help, was it? I cannot recall the details, but generally it was a matter of emergency management planning not being in place. Florida is full of "new communities" that pop up here and there without the management infrastructure in place to deal with emergencies.


Hmmm... not as long as I've been here...

We haven't had a landfalling 'cane since 1921, got smacked around a little by Jeanne and Frances, a little oops-upside-the-head back from the storm of the century in 1993 and an okie-doke from Elena back in 1985... that incident could have happened then.

Since Elena, the counties have been the ones in the driver's seat when it comes to giving the local input for disaster declarations so no one gets left out... the requests get pushed up through the county and the money comes back that way....

But, yes, we are woefully unprepared for hurricanes..
Member Since: June 20, 2005 Posts: 22 Comments: 1050
Quoting Jeff9641:
Everyone is talking about this invest that will affect no one while severe wx will affect millions of people tomorrow.
The invest is on topic.... it is, after all, a tropical weather blog.... LOL

Afternoon all. Looks like some interesting events of the past are being discussed.

Also looks like SW Indian Ocean is still relatively quiet.

I wonder if I dare to hope we will get a break from the deep-dropping cold fronts after this weekend......
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492. RM706
I'm at work ... /duck
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491. MTWX
Good afternoon all!! I got cut off the blog last night something about internal server issues. Still cannot access my weather location shortcuts on the main page.
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Howdy folks...I think I'm back for a bit this time (whew! It's been a rough 7 days or so)

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Quoting WAHA:
What did I say? I said it would become a tropical cyclone...and LOOK AT IT NOW!
(actually it's subtropical)


Where are you seeing subtropical, the official report.
Member Since: August 11, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2315
488. WAHA
What did I say? I said it would become a tropical cyclone...and LOOK AT IT NOW!
(actually it's subtropical)
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Quoting Chicklit:

Pinellas isn't where there was a town affected by hurricanes that wasn't a city so it didn't qualify for any help, was it? I cannot recall the details, but generally it was a matter of emergency management planning not being in place. Florida is full of "new communities" that pop up here and there without the management infrastructure in place to deal with emergencies.


Don't think it was Pinellas, they havnt had a direct hit in a long time.
Member Since: August 11, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2315
Quoting RM706:
Come to the Shaun and Tim show!! I'm lonely....

If I could, I would. But I'm at work. :(
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5792
Quoting TampaTom:


Thanks... we certainly do try. I love what I do.. .even though I've been told the sky isn't falling.

One day, I just hope all of this effort saves some lives...

Pinellas isn't where there was a town affected by hurricanes that wasn't a city so it didn't qualify for any help, was it? I cannot recall the details, but generally it was a matter of emergency management planning not being in place. Florida is full of "new communities" that pop up here and there without the management infrastructure in place to deal with emergencies.
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484. RM706
Come to the Shaun and Tim show!! I'm lonely....
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SHORT RANGE FORECAST DISCUSSION
NWS HYDROMETEOROLOGICAL PREDICTION CENTER CAMP SPRINGS MD
347 PM EST TUE MAR 09 2010

VALID 00Z WED MAR 10 2010 - 00Z FRI MAR 12 2010

THE MIDDLE OF THE COUNTRY CAN EXPECT A WET AND STORMY NEXT COUPLE
OF DAYS AS A WAVE OF UPPER LEVEL DISTURBANCES MAKE THEIR WAY
EASTWARD ACROSS THE CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN PLAINS. THE SYSTEM THAT
PRODUCED SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS OVER MUCH OF THE LOWER
MISSISSIPPI VALLEY AND SOUTHEAST DURING THE DAY TUESDAY WILL BEGIN
TO WEAKEN TUESDAY NIGHT AS THE ASSOCIATED SURFACE LOW TRACKS
NORTHWARDS TOWARDS THE UPPER MIDWEST AND A NEW SYSTEM EJECTS OUT
OF THE ROCKIES. THIS SECOND SYSTEM WILL QUICKLY DEVELOP OVER THE
SOUTHERN PLAINS DURING THE DAY WEDNESDAY AND CAUSE ANOTHER ROUND
OF SHOWERS ACROSS THE SOUTH CENTRAL U.S.. AN ABUNDANCE OF LOW
LEVEL MOISTURE AND INSTABILITY WILL SUPPORT THE DEVELOPMENT OF
SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS FROM THE CENTRAL GULF COAST TO THE MIDDLE
MISSISSIPPI VALLEY. AS THIS SECOND SYSTEM SLOWLY MOVES
NORTHEASTWARDS...HEAVY RAINS WILL BE POSSIBLE ALONG THE CENTRAL
GULF COAST AND INTO THE SOUTHEAST...WHERE TWO TO THREE INCH
RAINFALL TOTALS ARE EXPECTED BY THURSDAY EVENING. BY THE END OF
THE FORECAST PERIOD...PRECIPITATION FROM THIS SYSTEM WILL BEGIN TO
SPREAD INTO THE EASTERN U.S. AND CAUSE THE PLEASANT CONDITIONS IN
THE MID-ATLANTIC STATES AND NORTHEAST TO QUICKLY DETERIORATE.
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Quoting Chicklit:
Congrats TampaTom! Your site looked good.
No typos! Looks like you must enjoy your job.
I'm in grad school at UCF now for a certificate in public admin. Was considering the Masters in PA but think the Masters in non-profit management is better for me since that's what I've been doing for 3 years. Anyway, good job. It's best case scenario when you get paid for what you enjoy doing. Makes a difference in the result, too imo.


Thanks... we certainly do try. I love what I do.. .even though I've been told the sky isn't falling.

One day, I just hope all of this effort saves some lives...
Member Since: June 20, 2005 Posts: 22 Comments: 1050
Quoting SQUAWK:


HERE IS A OUTLOOK FOR DAY TWO FOR YA

Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 163 Comments: 52197
Wow...I could be east of Oklahoma City in just 12 hours...right down I-40.

Temptation City!

(/me takes deep breath and reflects on personal responsibilities)
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Quoting jeffs713:

Trade ya.

From May 15 through September 15, our normal forecast is as follows:
High - 95F
Low - 75F
Humidity - too high. (80+%)
South or SE wind, 5-10mph
Partly Cloudy
20% chance of precip

EVERY
SINGLE
DAY


I am sooooo glad to be out of that! Really, really glad. Ecstatic, actually.

Of course, this winter in the mountains was a little more than I needed, too. Some people are never satisfied.
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Quoting jeffs713:
Advisories for the severe wx will likely drop tonight, in time for the morning news.

Has anyone looked at the SPC page yet?

Slight Chance of a severe weather outbreak...I dont think the ingredients will be right for this system, but could be wrong, seems like the temperatures and humidity levels are not right.
Member Since: August 11, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2315
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 163 Comments: 52197
Advisories for the severe wx will likely drop tonight, in time for the morning news.

Has anyone looked at the SPC page yet?
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5792
Quoting CycloneOz:


Have advisories / warnings been issued yet?

Outbreak 2010 looms?

I haven't seen advisories for East Texas yet, but it has been highlighted on the Houston NWS discussion for 3 days now.
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5792

Quoting CycloneOz:


Have advisories / warnings been issued yet?

Outbreak 2010 looms?


No warnings at this time except flood stuff.

Member Since: August 11, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2315
Quoting Jeff9641:
Everyone is talking about this invest that will affect no one while severe wx will affect millions of people tomorrow.


Have advisories / warnings been issued yet?

Outbreak 2010 looms?
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Massive storm parks over nation's midsection
Mark Ressler, Lead Meteorologist, The Weather Channel
Mar. 9, 2010 1:45 pm ET
The evolving storm will continue to control the weather for much of the nation.

Yeah. That's better.
Where's Accu-weather-hype when you need them?

I think I see Levi under all of that blue in the upper NW section...
Anyway, everyone's talking about the Weird Invest because it's an anomaly, I think. Aside from providing us laypeople with a little insight, there are quite a few knowledgeable even professional weather geeks on the site.
Of course WG is an affectionate term!
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Congrats TampaTom! Your site looked good.
No typos! Looks like you must enjoy your job.
I'm in grad school at UCF now for a certificate in public admin. Was considering the Masters in PA but think the Masters in non-profit management is better for me since that's what I've been doing for 3 years. Anyway, good job. It's best case scenario when you get paid for what you enjoy doing. Makes a difference in the result, too imo.
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INV/90L/XX
MARK
30.1S/48.4W
30KTS/1000MB
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 163 Comments: 52197
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 163 Comments: 52197
Quoting CycloneOz:


There were so many things about my Ike "experience" that were indeed incredible!

1) Talking to all the people who were gathering near the tribute statue of those lost in the 1900 storm. Most were locals and none of them were evacuating. I found that to be alarming, with the surge forecast as it was. When Ike made landfall, that island was packed with people. Across the way on Point Bolivar (which did not have a protective seawall,) many people stayed there, too. Most of them are not alive today, unfortunately.

2) Having a news guy from New York root around in my hurricane van. "Very impressive," he said. "But you're missing something important. Food!" Then he gave me about 10 MREs. We're still friends to this day.

3) Standing right at the edge of the seawall at 7:00 PM! The waves were becoming monstrous! I used a brief shot from that moment in the intro...the one where there is a giant plume of water that engulfs me. As I worked right there next to the Balanese Ballroom, I was pretty much frightened out of my mind. All I could think of was "don't fall in...don't fall in!" When I finished getting my footage, I turned and saw that I had an audience of about 50 people who had gathered on the other side of the road. One guy had his family in a parked car at the light. "Dude, what you were doing was way cool," he said enthusiastically.

4) The phone call from my Mom at 8:30 PM right before I did the stand-up report. "Oh honey," her voice quivered. "Is there any way you can get off of that island?" What prompted her call were the news reports being given at that hour that basically said that many people on Galveston Island would die that night.

5) Feeling that garage "jolt" when the full force of Ike hit. Every eye in that garage was open wide with fear....including mine.

6) Not having the guts to walk across that parking lot at the height of the storm to get a better shot of the Mermaid Pier that had a spotlight on it. Had I done so, I would've gotten even more amazing footage, but I was scared to death by the surge forecast. I expected it to come. Everyone did. But the seawall saved the city, as did Ike's track which put my location directly under the cloud-covered eye.

7) Trying to get some sleep at 4:00 AM with the van, now exposed to Ike's westerly wind field bouncing up and down "like a bronco." My phone rang at 6:00 AM. It was Mom. She was calling to make sure I was still alive.

8) The destruction I witnessed the following morning after I made myself a cup of coffee. I had to zig-zag through town, avoiding flooded and/or blocked streets. I stopped often and took aftermath shots that you can see at the end of the video. At one stop, I spoke to a lady who told me that the Interstate highway was directly ahead of me, but that it was impassable, blocked by debris. I went up there anyway. I had just stopped my car at the intersection when a plow headed south moved right in front of me. I pulled out and saw two things a) a path had been cleared by the plow and b) there were no cars coming down the path. I took off, stopped once for the shot of the boat with the engine running, and then made it onto totally clear highway at the very moment a huge convoy of National Guard and equipment vehicles moved over into the path that the plow had made.

It was an incredible few days, I'm not likely to forget anytime soon.


WOW... that is QUITE an adventure!!
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Quoting WaterWitch11:


what!? i really believed you!

Sorry...

(Hey, it really has happened every 6 years in the 21st century! Only 10 years into it, though.)
Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 6 Comments: 12461
Not that I am aware of. Navy has it up, but not much there.

Gotta run.
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Quoting HurricaneHunterGal:


WOW! That must have been incredible!! Boy, what I would give to have been there too, haha!


There were so many things about my Ike "experience" that were indeed incredible!

1) Talking to all the people who were gathering near the tribute statue of those lost in the 1900 storm. Most were locals and none of them were evacuating. I found that to be alarming, with the surge forecast as it was. When Ike made landfall, that island was packed with people. Across the way on Point Bolivar (which did not have a protective seawall,) many people stayed there, too. Most of them are not alive today, unfortunately.

2) Having a news guy from New York root around in my hurricane van. "Very impressive," he said. "But you're missing something important. Food!" Then he gave me about 10 MREs. We're still friends to this day.

3) Standing right at the edge of the seawall at 7:00 PM! The waves were becoming monstrous! I used a brief shot from that moment in the intro...the one where there is a giant plume of water that engulfs me. As I worked right there next to the Balanese Ballroom, I was pretty much frightened out of my mind. All I could think of was "don't fall in...don't fall in!" When I finished getting my footage, I turned and saw that I had an audience of about 50 people who had gathered on the other side of the road. One guy had his family in a parked car at the light. "Dude, what you were doing was way cool," he said enthusiastically.

4) The phone call from my Mom at 8:30 PM right before I did the stand-up report. "Oh honey," her voice quivered. "Is there any way you can get off of that island?" What prompted her call were the news reports being given at that hour that basically said that many people on Galveston Island would die that night.

5) Feeling that garage "jolt" when the full force of Ike hit. Every eye in that garage was open wide with fear....including mine.

6) Not having the guts to walk across that parking lot at the height of the storm to get a better shot of the Mermaid Pier that had a spotlight on it. Had I done so, I would've gotten even more amazing footage, but I was scared to death by the surge forecast. I expected it to come. Everyone did. But the seawall saved the city, as did Ike's track which put my location directly under the cloud-covered eye.

7) Trying to get some sleep at 4:00 AM with the van, now exposed to Ike's westerly wind field bouncing up and down "like a bronco." My phone rang at 6:00 AM. It was Mom. She was calling to make sure I was still alive.

8) The destruction I witnessed the following morning after I made myself a cup of coffee. I had to zig-zag through town, avoiding flooded and/or blocked streets. I stopped often and took aftermath shots that you can see at the end of the video. At one stop, I spoke to a lady who told me that the Interstate highway was directly ahead of me, but that it was impassable, blocked by debris. I went up there anyway. I had just stopped my car at the intersection when a plow headed south moved right in front of me. I pulled out and saw two things a) a path had been cleared by the plow and b) there were no cars coming down the path. I took off, stopped once for the shot of the boat with the engine running, and then made it onto totally clear highway at the very moment a huge convoy of National Guard and equipment vehicles moved over into the path that the plow had made.

It was an incredible few days, I'm not likely to forget anytime soon.
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Quoting Seastep:
Wonder why, but the floater on 90Q had 1909Z and 1939Z as the last two frames, but now they have replaced them only to 1745Z now.

Here's the 1939Z still.



Rather impressive lil' system there off the coast of Brazil, I wonder whether or not 90L will be named? Any recent updates??
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Quoting atmoaggie:

A lot of wet helps 'em...a dry month (like our June and your July last year) tends to kill 'em off almost as well as freezing...except the Pterodactyl-sized, tiger-striped, not-blood-sucking, but flesh-consuming salt water marsh ones.

Very true. I've been swatting the "mosquito hawks" (HUGE mosquitos that don't bite) lately at my house, so I'm hoping it dries up soon.
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5792
Java loop still has it.

They only changed the flash loop.
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Wonder why, but the floater on 90Q had 1909Z and 1939Z as the last two frames, but now they have replaced them only to 1745Z now.

Here's the 1939Z still.

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Quoting WaterWitch11:


what!? i really believed you!


wait a minute, i get it. every 6 years for the 21st century. very funny!
i'm a little slow on the draw!
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Quoting atmoaggie:

Sry, I was teasing a little. Happened in 2004. Other than that, I don't think we know about any others.


what!? i really believed you!
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Hurricane Vince:



Vince formed differently and was much stronger, but the situation to Invest 90Q is similar. Vince was technically subtropical but the NHC refused to call it that because they believe a subtropical hurricane is theoretically impossible, which it technically is, but a small, shallow, warm-core hybrid system can attain winds of hurricane force over waters cooler than 26C. Hurricane Vince was proof of that.

Now again this invest is far weaker than Vince, although probably already at tropical storm strength. Notice the similarities though. The size of both systems are small, and they are both subtropical (cold air aloft, warm-core structure limited to lower atmosphere). If you want to be picky then you can call them a different kind of hybrid from a traditional subtropical system, but the fact is that these kinds of systems can get far stronger than we think. Their intensity is limited due to their shallowness, but that shallowness does allow them to attain at least Cat 1 strength, as we saw with Vince. 90Q even has the eye feature already, showing the intense convective banding wrapping into the center. I don't think this system will get to the level that Vince did, but the similarities are interesting.
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09/1745 UTC 30.0S 48.3W ST1.5 INVEST -- South Atlantic
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Quoting jeffs713:

Historically here in SETX, the summer after a hard winter (by our standards) has less issues with insects all year. The populations never fully catch up, especially if people are vigilant in preventing them (this applies mostly to mosquitos).

A lot of wet helps 'em...a dry month (like our June and your July last year) tends to kill 'em off almost as well as freezing...except the Pterodactyl-sized, tiger-striped, not-blood-sucking, but flesh-consuming salt water marsh ones.
Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 6 Comments: 12461
Vince Mirror Version anyone?



The eye-feature is further evidence that the system has a low-level warm-core structure and is truly subtropical. Convection is very shallow, which is typical of subtropical systems over cold waters. Invest 90Q is currently vertically stacked under a cut-off upper low which will be phasing back into the westerlies over the next couple days, during which 90Q will be pulled south or southwestward and convert to extratropical by 72 hours. Today is the system's best chance at earning a name, and I do believe this is a subtropical storm right now. The WindSat pass from last night showed a closed circulation with a wind maximum at the center of 30 knots. The next pass in a few hours will likely show an even tighter wind core.

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Quoting CycloneOz:
Of all the news crews present at Hurricane Ike, I was the only one to record destruction during the storm.

Somewhere near the middle of the video, you'll see part of the Mermaid Pier take the "deep six" into the Gulf.

It was an amazing time for me at that moment. I had the camera set up recording on its own. I was off talking to the mets, and we were wondering when the surge was going to hit. When I went back to my camera, I looked out and noticed that something "had changed" in the shot.

It wasn't until I got home and watched the footage that I saw I had captured a critical destructive moment of the storm.

An insurance adjustment agency out of Maryland bought 10 copies of the DVD last year just because I had captured that moment.


WOW! That must have been incredible!! Boy, what I would give to have been there too, haha!
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About JeffMasters

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.