Heavy snow, rain, and flooding for the Northeast U.S.

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:21 PM GMT on February 25, 2010

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The winter of 2009-2010 continues its relentless onslaught over the U.S. today, as a powerful low pressure system intensifying along the East Coast brings heavy snow, flooding rains, and high winds to New England and the Mid-Atlantic. The storm has already dropped more than two feet of snow over Eastern New York near Albany, and surrounding regions of Western Massachusetts and Southern Vermont. These regions are now seeing rain mixed in with the snow, which will limit further accumulations to 1 - 3 inches. Farther east, flooding is a concern for most of Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, southern New Hampshire, and portions of western Maine, where heavy rainfall of 1 - 3 inches on top of a snow pack with a high water content has created runoff that has already swollen many rivers to flood stage. Heavy snow is the main concern over southeast New York, northern New Jersey, and northeast Pennsylvania. The unusually slow-moving storm is expected to drop snow amounts of up to 18" in the Pocono Mountains of northeast Pennsylvania, and in northern New Jersey. New York City, whose 30.5" of snow so far this winter is 13" above average for this date, could get up to a foot of wet, heavy snow. Philadelphia's 73" of snow for the season will get an 8 - 12" boost from the storm, taking their record snowiest winter even further into record territory. Wind gusts of 30 - 40 mph in combination with the very wet, heavy snow will make power outages a problem over much of the region.


Figure 1. Visible satellite image at 9:30am EST Thursday, February 25, 2010 showing today's Northeast U.S. snowstorm. Image credit: NASA GSFC GOES project.

Some selected storm-total snowfall amounts, from Tuesday morning through 10am EST today, courtesy of the National Weather Service:

...CONNECTICUT...
BURLINGTON 10.0
NEW HARTFORD 3.8 W 9.0

...KENTUCKY...
OVEN FORK 1 NE 5.0
BLEDSOE 2 SE 4.0

...MASSACHUSETTS...
SAVOY 28.5
ROWE 25.0
CHESTERFIELD 24.0
ASHFIELD 23.6
HEATH 22.0
SHELBURNE 22.0
PLAINFIELD 21.5
PITTSFIELD 20.0
BECKET 19.8
CHESTER 19.5
BLANDFORD 19.0
ASHBURNHAM 16.8
LANESBOROUGH 16.0
NORTH OTIS 16.0
NEW ASHFORD 13.0
WORCESTER 10.7

...NEW HAMPSHIRE...
EAST LEMPSTER 20.0
WASHINGTON 18.5
PETERBOROUGH 18.0
RANDOLF 17.6
GREENFIELD 16.0
NEWPORT 15.3
WILTON 14.0
BENNINGTON 13.0
WAPOLE 12.9
WEST CHESTERFIELD 10.8
LEMPSTER 10.0

...NEW YORK...
ALTAMONT 26.5
WESTERLO 26.0
WILLARD MTN BASE 25.0
NORTH HEBRON 24.0
MEDUSA 23.0
MORIAH 22.5
TABORTON 22.0
DURHAM 20.0
PORTER CORNERS 20.0
ROXBURY 18.9
PHOENICIA 18.5
CHATHAM CENTER 18.0
SCHENECTADY 15.0
ALBANY 12.4
BINGHAMTON 10.5

...OHIO...
CARROLOTON 5.5

...PENNSYLVANIA...
PONOCO PEAK LAKE 13.0
HAWLEY 3.8 NE 11.0
WANTAGE 11.0
PLEASANT MOUNT 10.0
DINGMANS FERRY 3.9 WSW 9.2
MILANVILLE 1.5 SE 8.9
SAYLORSBURG 8.5
BEEMERVILLE 8.0
EAST STROUDSBURG 8.0
THOMPSON 8.0

...RHODE ISLAND...
BURRILLVILLE 6.5
WEST GLOCESTER 5.1
WOONSOCKET 0.3 W 3.4

...TENNESSEE...
APPALACHIA 3.0
ROAN MOUNTAIN 3.0

Update on this Saturday's major winter storm in Europe
Computer forecast models continue to forecast the development of a powerful winter storm that will rapidly intensify Saturday morning into a meteorological "bomb" that will bring high winds and flooding rains to Portugal, northern Spain, and possibly France. However, today's model runs are less aggressive in deepening the storm, and no longer call for the storm to be as intense as last year's Winter Storm Klaus. Klaus, which hit northern Spain and southwest France January 23 - 25, was Earth's most costly natural disaster of 2009, causing $5.1 billion in damage and killing 26. Klaus peaked in intensity at 967 mb, and brought wind gusts of 120 mph (193 km/hr) to Formiguères, France, 125 mph (200 km/hr) to Portbou, Spain, and 134 mph (216 km/hr) to Port d'Envalira, Andorra. Last night's 00Z (7pm EST) run of the ECMWF model and GFS model called for Saturday's storm to have 974 - 976 mb central pressure. Saturday's storm still has the potential to be plenty damaging, as winds of tropical storm force with gusts to hurricane force should affect a large swath of Portugal and northern Spain.


Figure 2. Forecast from the 1am EST 2/25/10 run of the GFS model for 18 GMT Saturday for surface winds. The GFS is predicting that Saturday's storm will peak in intensity at this time with a pressure of 974 mb. Sustained winds just below hurricane force of 60 - 75 mph (green colors) are expected offshore from Portugal. Image was generated using our wundermap for Spain with the "model" layer turned on.

Next post
My next post will be Friday.

Jeff Masters

Tear Drop (suzi46)
this frozen drop was suspended on the thinnest filament of ice over our frozen brook..so very delicate and beautiful
Tear Drop
()

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521. marhil
5:04 PM GMT on January 23, 2011
What is the approximate 1000-500mb thickness value for an all snow storm in the northwest suburbs of Philadelphia ? I read it is around 540dm for State College, Pa. and varies from region to region. Anybody know what it is for the Phila. suburbs ?
Member Since: January 20, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
520. wunderkidcayman
1:21 AM GMT on February 27, 2010
hi guys what up
Member Since: June 13, 2009 Posts: 2 Comments: 12151
519. Levi32
12:51 AM GMT on February 27, 2010
Quoting altesticstorm10:
Does anyone have an atlantic ocean SST anomaly map from Feb/March of 2005? Because, if I recall correctly, that winter was an El Niño event as well (one which died by late April)...Thanks in advance


I will post an answer to your question in the latest blog. This one is old.
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26654
517. hydrus
8:38 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting Floodman:


Don't be too sure...a 60 mile long iceberg, 27 miles wide? That's a fair amount of water locked up
whats up Flood? they have had some mild winters in New England the past few years. I believe Mother nature is making up for lost time fast.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 21416
516. Floodman
7:01 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting TampaSpin:
The icebergs is like a grain of salt in the very large ocean body......it will have very little affect if any IMO!!


Don't be too sure...a 60 mile long iceberg, 27 miles wide? That's a fair amount of water locked up
Member Since: August 2, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 9922
515. TampaTom
6:06 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
¡Sno mas!
Member Since: June 20, 2005 Posts: 22 Comments: 1054
514. Levi32
6:00 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Record Report
Statement as of 12:21 PM EST on February 26, 2010


... Record monthly maximum snowfall set at Central Park NY...

An all time monthly record snowfall of 35.9 inches was set at
Central Park NY as of 12:00 PM. This breaks the all time
snowiest month record for Central Park. The old record was 30.5
inches set back in March 1896.

Snow continues to fall... and the monthly total for Central Park will
be updated as the day progresses. Central Park snow records date
back to 1869.


Please refer to pnsokx statements for the latest available Central
Park snowfall.
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26654
513. TampaTom
5:59 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting NewEnglandCT:
really good radar pic of the storm over NYC





NICE banding....
Member Since: June 20, 2005 Posts: 22 Comments: 1054
512. NewEnglandCT
5:54 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
really good radar pic of the storm over NYC



Member Since: January 24, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 13
511. TampaSpin
5:36 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
The icebergs is like a grain of salt in the very large ocean body......it will have very little affect if any IMO!!
Member Since: September 2, 2007 Posts: 178 Comments: 20443
510. Floodman
5:36 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting StormChaser81:


Just close your eye's and it will all go away.lol


"There's no place like home,
There's no place like home"
Member Since: August 2, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 9922
509. Levi32
5:11 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
This is really bugging me now...

Does anyone know anything at all about how to get an image to show up in the blog header (title) where it usually says "so-and-so's wunderblog".

I've done it before but years ago and now that I want to update it I can't figure it out. The normal img code doesn't work.
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26654
508. TampaTom
5:06 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting CycloneOz:


Imagine taking that advice when you're standing in the eyewall of a Cat 4. LOL!


It's all mind over matter...

You don't mind, it don't matter....
Member Since: June 20, 2005 Posts: 22 Comments: 1054
507. CycloneOz
4:58 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting StormChaser81:


Just close your eye's and it will all go away.lol


Imagine taking that advice when you're standing in the eyewall of a Cat 4. LOL!
Member Since: August 26, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 3753
506. TampaTom
4:58 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting StormChaser81:
Picture of those two huge icebergs.



Tow one of them babies up to the Gulf for hurricane season!
Member Since: June 20, 2005 Posts: 22 Comments: 1054
505. HurricaneHunterGal
4:35 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting StormChaser81:


Just close your eye's and it will all go away.lol


Lol, I am not worried about it, I am just intrieged by it. Is the iceburg big enough and in the right location to really cause salinity changes? And have an effect on ocean temperature enough to have a greater overall effect?

Just curious, not worried.
Member Since: August 17, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 249
504. StormChaser81
4:32 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting HurricaneHunterGal:


I know ocean currents have changed in the past-- but I have not studied past changing ocean currents, so I don't know much about the reality (or gravity--or lack thereof) of the situation.


Just close your eye's and it will all go away.lol
Member Since: August 11, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2315
503. HurricaneHunterGal
4:30 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting HurricaneHunterGal:


I was just about to post the picture, too! They are pretty big iceburgs!

I find it interesting that the article's title pretty much says "The ocean currents will change!" but the article itself does not go into too much detail about it-- or at least the amount of details I was looking for. The explanation makes sense, but I was looking for more. I, for one, would like to know the likleyhood of this actually occuring.


I know ocean currents have changed in the past-- but I have not studied past changing ocean currents, so I don't know much about the reality (or gravity--or lack thereof) of the situation.
Member Since: August 17, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 249
502. Chicklit
4:29 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Wow. Looks like the NE storm is going to swallow Manhattan!
Winter Storm Warning
NYZ068-070>076-261800-
/O.CON.KOKX.WS.W.0004.000000T0000Z-100227T1100Z/
PUTNAM-NORTHERN WESTCHESTER-SOUTHERN WESTCHESTER-NEW YORK (MANHATTAN)-BRONX-RICHMOND (STATEN ISLAND)-KINGS (BROOKLYN)-QUEENS-4:31 AM EST FRI FEB 26 2010

...WINTER STORM WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT UNTIL 6 AM EST SATURDAY...

SNOW...HEAVY AT TIMES...WILL CONTINUE THROUGH THIS MORNING. IN ADDITION TO THE FALLING SNOW...WIND GUSTS OF UP TO 35 MPH WILL CAUSE BLOWING AND DRIFTING OF THE SNOW...AS WELL AS BRIEF REDUCTIONS IN VISIBILITY LESS THAN ONE QUARTER OF A MILE.

THE WIND WILL STEADILY DECREASE THROUGH NOON. LIGHT TO OCCASIONALLY MODERATE SNOW WILL CONTINUE THROUGH TONIGHT.

STORM TOTAL SNOWFALL OF 12 TO 18 INCHES CAN BE EXPECTED IN NEW YORK CITY...WITH TOTALS OF 15 TO 25 INCHES EXPECTED ACROSS PUTNAM AND WESTCHESTER COUNTIES.
PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A WINTER STORM WARNING MEANS SIGNIFICANT AMOUNTS OF SNOW...SLEET... AND ICE ARE EXPECTED OR OCCURRING. STRONG WINDS ARE ALSO POSSIBLE. THIS WILL MAKE TRAVEL VERY HAZARDOUS OR IMPOSSIBLE.

STAY TUNED TO NOAA ALL HAZARDS WEATHER RADIO OR VISIT OUR WEB
SITE AT WEATHER.GOV/NYC FOR FURTHER DETAILS AND UPDATES.

&&

Member Since: July 11, 2006 Posts: 14 Comments: 11348
501. HurricaneHunterGal
4:28 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting StormChaser81:
Picture of those two huge icebergs.



I was just about to post the picture, too! They are pretty big iceburgs!

I find it interesting that the article's title pretty much says "The ocean currents will change!" but the article itself does not go into too much detail about it-- or at least the amount of details I was looking for. The explanation makes sense, but I was looking for more. I, for one, would like to know the likleyhood of this actually occuring.
Member Since: August 17, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 249
500. StormChaser81
4:22 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting CycloneOz:


If it were August, I know what I'd want to call that!


Yup
Member Since: August 11, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2315
499. StormChaser81
4:21 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Picture of those two huge icebergs.

Member Since: August 11, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2315
498. HurricaneHunterGal
4:21 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Vast iceberg may alter ocean currents--
Luxembourg-sized chunk breaks off from Antarctica

Interesting Article from MSNBC
Member Since: August 17, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 249
497. CycloneOz
4:20 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting StormChaser81:
Visible


If it were August, I know what I'd want to call that!
Member Since: August 26, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 3753
496. StormChaser81
4:19 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting NEwxguy:
Don't know if anyone saw the story in Hampton Beach,NH,there was a major fire.The roof blew off a hotel during the storm and it started a fire and the hotel burned to the ground along with adjacent businesses.Can't imagine trying to fight a fire in winds gusting over 60 mph.


Just stand up wind with the fire hose and shoot down wind.
Member Since: August 11, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2315
495. StormChaser81
4:17 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Visible
Member Since: August 11, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2315
494. NEwxguy
4:17 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Don't know if anyone saw the story in Hampton Beach,NH,there was a major fire.The roof blew off a hotel during the storm and it started a fire and the hotel burned to the ground along with adjacent businesses.Can't imagine trying to fight a fire in winds gusting over 60 mph.
Member Since: September 6, 2007 Posts: 881 Comments: 15840
493. Patrap
4:14 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Eastern U. S. - Rainbow Loop

Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128653
492. CycloneOz
4:12 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting Bordonaro:
Latest NE US Radar Loop! Look at the BIG Low spin, looks like it is centered right near Manhattan!!


Dang if it ain't a snowicane. Dramatic loop! Best of Week nominee!
Member Since: August 26, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 3753
491. Patrap
4:11 PM GMT on February 26, 2010


Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128653
490. Bordonaro
4:09 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Latest NE US Radar Loop! Look at the BIG Low spin, looks like it is centered right near Manhattan!!
Member Since: August 25, 2009 Posts: 20 Comments: 6785
489. Patrap
4:08 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
123
fxus64 klix 260921
afdlix


Area forecast discussion
National Weather Service New Orleans la
321 am CST Friday Feb 26 2010


Short term...


A short wave trough currently moving through the Southern Plains
will slide into the Gulf south today and tonight. A surface low is
beginning to form over southern Texas in a region of enhanced
lift and baroclinicity. The low is expected to move strong low
level moisture advection taking place early this morning will
continue in advance of the low through the day. Isentropically
induced showers should develop by this afternoon across the
forecast area as southwest flow in the middle-levels overruns a
cooler and more stable low level air mass.


Tonight...the short wave trough will move through the Gulf south.
In the low levels...the surface low is expected to move through
the northern Gulf of Mexico. Strong forcing associated with this
low will bring a broad shield of light to moderate rain to the
forecast area through the early morning hours.

However...a change
over to a wintry mix of rain...sleet...and snow will be possible

over southwest Mississippi and far northern sections of the
Florida parishes around daybreak. This change over to a wintry mix
will be driven by a combination of wet bulb cooling in the low
levels and a cold pool aloft advecting in with the main core of
the upper level low. This cold pool should drop temperatures
aloft into a favorable range for snow formation. In addition...the
low levels will see some cold air advection take hold on the back
side of the low which will only assist in a transition over to a
wintry mix. The main limiting factor will be how light the
precipitation will be by daybreak tomorrow. At this time...it
appears the precipitation will be light...which will limit the
potential for accumulation. All of the precipitation will come to
an in the afternoon hours as strong negative vorticity advection
and subsidence takes hold. Deep layer ridging will dominate the
area on Sunday...with clear skies and cooler than normal
temperatures expected.


Long term...


Heading into next week...the models are finally beginning to get
into better agreement on the next system for Monday and Tuesday.
The GFS and European model (ecmwf) both depict a low moving through the northern
Gulf of Mexico. However...the GFS is far more progressive with the
system than the European model (ecmwf). Given the inconsistency of the GFS...have
trended more toward the European model (ecmwf) solution.


Initially....expect the deep layer ridging to quickly slide to the
east Sunday night...as another strong upper level low moves into
the Southern Plains. A region of difluent flow aloft will allow
for strong ascent on the southeast side of the system. This strong
lifting in the upper levels will interact with a sharp thermal
gradient over the western Gulf of Mexico Sunday night. Another
Gulf low should begin to form over the western Gulf of Mexico at
this time. With strong Omega values aloft and decent isentropic
forcing in the middle-levels as southwest flow rides over a cooler
and more stable low level air mass...expect clouds and rain to
overspread the entire forecast area on Monday. The precipitation
should continue into Monday night as the low tracks through the
northern Gulf of Mexico and begins to deepen rapidly. As the
low strengthens...cold air advection will develop across the
forecast area. Also...a cold pool associated with the upper level
low will be passing through. The combination of low level cold air
advection and a cold pool aloft should support a transition over
to wintry mix of precipitation late Monday night into Tuesday
morning. It is far too early to determine the exact timing and
type of precipitation along with any accumulation amounts. This next
system will have to be monitored carefully through the weekend.



After the low pulls to the east Tuesday night...strong negative
vorticity and dry air advection will develop across the Gulf
south. Clearing skies and cool temperatures can be expected. The
overall flow should then turn more zonal heading into the latter
half of the week. Slowly moderating temperatures and dry
conditions are expected through Friday.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128653
488. Patrap
4:05 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Accu hypes everything so now they are the New Gods?

LOL

The NOAA team was on top of the fray and thats who really mattesr at the end of the day.

It was a storm,it snowed,it rained,..the wind blew.


Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128653
487. NEwxguy
4:05 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting Floodman:


I don't think an apology is in order, as Accu tends to be "way over the top" on nearly everything they predict...it's all or nothing for them and if you do it that way of course you'll be dead on accurate at some point (the old "even a blind squirrel will kick up an acorn" scenario


Your right,my friend,keep predicting the big one and you will get it right sometime.
Member Since: September 6, 2007 Posts: 881 Comments: 15840
486. Nimitz
4:04 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting Jeff9641:


Your snow probalities are gone for maybe years. Anybody forecasting snow in the panhandle at this point is foolish talk. Sun angle is now as high as it would be in early Oct. or late Sept.
Also, next years neutral conditions could mean a fairly warm winter for the south next year.


Please God tell me that is true. In my 58 years of living in the south, 45 of it in Jacksonville, I can never remember a winter like this one. I am sick to death of being cold.
Member Since: August 17, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 99
485. tornadodude
4:03 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360
484. Floodman
4:01 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting NEwxguy:


I'll be one of those apologizing,I thought ACCU was going way over the top,but after last night,they were right on.


I don't think an apology is in order, as Accu tends to be "way over the top" on nearly everything they predict...it's all or nothing for them and if you do it that way of course you'll be dead on accurate at some point (the old "even a blind squirrel will kick up an acorn" scenario
Member Since: August 2, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 9922
483. StormChaser81
3:53 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting AussieStorm:
WOW, talk about a big tropical low.



Could that be another Typhoon Tip forming, better hope not.




Member Since: August 11, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2315
482. AussieStorm
3:51 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
WOW, talk about a big tropical low.

Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15940
481. tornadodude
3:30 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting fireflymom:

I thought those were politicians, my mistake.


yeah both at times?
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360
480. StormChaser81
3:30 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting fireflymom:
Quoting StormChaser81:


Then the alligators and huge sewer rats will spill onto the city streets and take over.
wallstreet? haha :p
I thought those were politicians, my mistake.


Politicians are the really fat rats that the alligators eat first. Alligators eat them first because they dont have very much meat, mostly hot air just comes out.=)
Member Since: August 11, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2315
479. fireflymom
3:26 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting StormChaser81:


Then the alligators and huge sewer rats will spill onto the city streets and take over.
wallstreet? haha :p
I thought those were politicians, my mistake.
Member Since: June 5, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 588
478. seflagamma
3:26 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Good morning everyone,


I just got this email Memo from work addressed to us leaders of my company about this coming Hurricane Season.
Interesting information and some much needed changes.




“A few highlights from the NOAA Product Changes for the 2010 Hurricane Season.”

Leader's
Effective May 15, the National Hurricane Center will implement important changes in some of its text and graphical products. It will also make some additions to its Web site and experimental products. This is part of a continuing effort at the National Hurricane Center to expand and enhance its level of service.



Changes:

• Watches and warnings for tropical storms and hurricanes along threatened coastal areas will be issued 12 hours earlier than in previous years. Tropical storm watches will be issued when tropical storm conditions are possible along the coast within 48 hours. Tropical storm warnings will be issued when those conditions are expected within 36 hours. Similar increases in lead-time will apply to hurricane watches and warnings.
• The format of the Tropical Cyclone Public Advisory is changing. The most significant changes are:
1. The Public Advisory will be organized into sections. Within these sections, keywords will be used to assist the human eye and computer software to find specific information more readily.
2. The summary section of the advisory will move to the top of the product, immediately following the headline. The summary section will contain more information than it did previously.
3. Watch and warning information will be organized differently and be presented in list or bullet form.
• A summary section, identical to the one found in the Public Advisory, will be added to the Tropical Cyclone Update whenever storm information (e.g., position, intensity, movement, pressure, etc.) changes from the previous Advisory.
• The genesis forecasts for the risk of tropical cyclone development will be provided to nearest 10 percent, in both the text and graphical Tropical Weather Outlooks. In previous years, only risk categories (low/medium/high) were given.
• The National Weather Service and its National Hurricane Center will begin using the generic term "post-tropical" to refer to any system that no longer possesses sufficient tropical characteristics to be considered a tropical cyclone. Post-tropical cyclones can continue to carry heavy rains and strong winds. Some post-tropical cyclones will go on to become fully extratropical, that is, derive their energy from the temperature contrast between warm and cold air masses. Another type of post-tropical cyclone is the "remnant low", a weak system with limited thunderstorm activity and winds of less than tropical storm strength.
• The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale will become operational. The scale keeps the same wind speed ranges as the original Saffir-Simpson Scale for each of the five hurricane categories, but no longer ties specific storm surge and flooding effects to each category.
• The size of the tropical cyclone forecast cone will be adjusted. The cone represents the probable track of the center of a tropical cyclone, and is formed by enclosing the area swept out by a set of imaginary circles placed along the forecast track (at 12, 24, 36 hours, etc.). The size of each circle is set so that two-thirds of historical official forecast errors over a 5-year sample fall within the circle. The circle radii defining the cones in 2010 for the Atlantic and eastern North Pacific basins are given in the table below.
Forecast Period
(hours) Circle radius
Atlantic Basin
(nautical miles) Circle radius
Eastern North Pacific Basin
(nautical miles)
12 36 36
24 62 59
36 85 82
48 108 102
72 161 138
96 220 174
120 285 220



Member Since: August 29, 2005 Posts: 299 Comments: 40917
477. NttyGrtty
3:26 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting tornadodude:
If that ice berg melts.... it could flood NYC :P

This is actually great news. Iceberg ice melts into very pure water, which when used to ferment grain makes very pure vodka. A 60 mile iceberg can make a whole lot of vodka! Martinis for everyone!!! Now we need to find olives...
Member Since: February 11, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 840
476. tornadodude
3:21 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting StormChaser81:


Then the alligators and huge sewer rats will spill onto the city streets and take over.


wallstreet? haha :p
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360
475. fireflymom
3:18 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
It will be interesting to see what if any effect that berg has on our weather for the next few Hurricane/Typhoon seasons as it may affect ocean circulation.
Member Since: June 5, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 588
474. StormChaser81
3:18 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting tornadodude:
If that ice berg melts.... it could flood NYC :P



Then the alligators and huge sewer rats will spill onto the city streets and take over.
Member Since: August 11, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2315
473. tornadodude
3:15 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
If that ice berg melts.... it could flood NYC :P

Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360
472. StormChaser81
3:13 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting Chicklit:
AntarticBergs
Two Big Ones just broke free in Antarctica and are on the move. Question of how much deep sea oxygen levels will be affected.


I'm sure it's happened many times in the past and the ocean life is still in existence. Might change currents but there's nothing we can to about or should do about it. Just watch and learn. Knowing MAN they'll want to blow it up to save the oceans. lol
Member Since: August 11, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2315
471. fireflymom
3:07 PM GMT on February 26, 2010
Here is a link to the iceberg article it is huge.
Penguins (C) drift on an ice floe beneath a cathedral iceberg in the Southern Ocean
http://www.physorg.com/news186339017.html
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.