Heavy snow, rain, and flooding for the Northeast U.S.

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:21 PM GMT on February 25, 2010

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The winter of 2009-2010 continues its relentless onslaught over the U.S. today, as a powerful low pressure system intensifying along the East Coast brings heavy snow, flooding rains, and high winds to New England and the Mid-Atlantic. The storm has already dropped more than two feet of snow over Eastern New York near Albany, and surrounding regions of Western Massachusetts and Southern Vermont. These regions are now seeing rain mixed in with the snow, which will limit further accumulations to 1 - 3 inches. Farther east, flooding is a concern for most of Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, southern New Hampshire, and portions of western Maine, where heavy rainfall of 1 - 3 inches on top of a snow pack with a high water content has created runoff that has already swollen many rivers to flood stage. Heavy snow is the main concern over southeast New York, northern New Jersey, and northeast Pennsylvania. The unusually slow-moving storm is expected to drop snow amounts of up to 18" in the Pocono Mountains of northeast Pennsylvania, and in northern New Jersey. New York City, whose 30.5" of snow so far this winter is 13" above average for this date, could get up to a foot of wet, heavy snow. Philadelphia's 73" of snow for the season will get an 8 - 12" boost from the storm, taking their record snowiest winter even further into record territory. Wind gusts of 30 - 40 mph in combination with the very wet, heavy snow will make power outages a problem over much of the region.


Figure 1. Visible satellite image at 9:30am EST Thursday, February 25, 2010 showing today's Northeast U.S. snowstorm. Image credit: NASA GSFC GOES project.

Some selected storm-total snowfall amounts, from Tuesday morning through 10am EST today, courtesy of the National Weather Service:

...CONNECTICUT...
BURLINGTON 10.0
NEW HARTFORD 3.8 W 9.0

...KENTUCKY...
OVEN FORK 1 NE 5.0
BLEDSOE 2 SE 4.0

...MASSACHUSETTS...
SAVOY 28.5
ROWE 25.0
CHESTERFIELD 24.0
ASHFIELD 23.6
HEATH 22.0
SHELBURNE 22.0
PLAINFIELD 21.5
PITTSFIELD 20.0
BECKET 19.8
CHESTER 19.5
BLANDFORD 19.0
ASHBURNHAM 16.8
LANESBOROUGH 16.0
NORTH OTIS 16.0
NEW ASHFORD 13.0
WORCESTER 10.7

...NEW HAMPSHIRE...
EAST LEMPSTER 20.0
WASHINGTON 18.5
PETERBOROUGH 18.0
RANDOLF 17.6
GREENFIELD 16.0
NEWPORT 15.3
WILTON 14.0
BENNINGTON 13.0
WAPOLE 12.9
WEST CHESTERFIELD 10.8
LEMPSTER 10.0

...NEW YORK...
ALTAMONT 26.5
WESTERLO 26.0
WILLARD MTN BASE 25.0
NORTH HEBRON 24.0
MEDUSA 23.0
MORIAH 22.5
TABORTON 22.0
DURHAM 20.0
PORTER CORNERS 20.0
ROXBURY 18.9
PHOENICIA 18.5
CHATHAM CENTER 18.0
SCHENECTADY 15.0
ALBANY 12.4
BINGHAMTON 10.5

...OHIO...
CARROLOTON 5.5

...PENNSYLVANIA...
PONOCO PEAK LAKE 13.0
HAWLEY 3.8 NE 11.0
WANTAGE 11.0
PLEASANT MOUNT 10.0
DINGMANS FERRY 3.9 WSW 9.2
MILANVILLE 1.5 SE 8.9
SAYLORSBURG 8.5
BEEMERVILLE 8.0
EAST STROUDSBURG 8.0
THOMPSON 8.0

...RHODE ISLAND...
BURRILLVILLE 6.5
WEST GLOCESTER 5.1
WOONSOCKET 0.3 W 3.4

...TENNESSEE...
APPALACHIA 3.0
ROAN MOUNTAIN 3.0

Update on this Saturday's major winter storm in Europe
Computer forecast models continue to forecast the development of a powerful winter storm that will rapidly intensify Saturday morning into a meteorological "bomb" that will bring high winds and flooding rains to Portugal, northern Spain, and possibly France. However, today's model runs are less aggressive in deepening the storm, and no longer call for the storm to be as intense as last year's Winter Storm Klaus. Klaus, which hit northern Spain and southwest France January 23 - 25, was Earth's most costly natural disaster of 2009, causing $5.1 billion in damage and killing 26. Klaus peaked in intensity at 967 mb, and brought wind gusts of 120 mph (193 km/hr) to Formiguères, France, 125 mph (200 km/hr) to Portbou, Spain, and 134 mph (216 km/hr) to Port d'Envalira, Andorra. Last night's 00Z (7pm EST) run of the ECMWF model and GFS model called for Saturday's storm to have 974 - 976 mb central pressure. Saturday's storm still has the potential to be plenty damaging, as winds of tropical storm force with gusts to hurricane force should affect a large swath of Portugal and northern Spain.


Figure 2. Forecast from the 1am EST 2/25/10 run of the GFS model for 18 GMT Saturday for surface winds. The GFS is predicting that Saturday's storm will peak in intensity at this time with a pressure of 974 mb. Sustained winds just below hurricane force of 60 - 75 mph (green colors) are expected offshore from Portugal. Image was generated using our wundermap for Spain with the "model" layer turned on.

Next post
My next post will be Friday.

Jeff Masters

Tear Drop (suzi46)
this frozen drop was suspended on the thinnest filament of ice over our frozen brook..so very delicate and beautiful
Tear Drop
()

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271. hydrus
1:53 AM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting PcolaDan:


I just figured if a low crossed the equator it would automatically become a high. ;)
If I ever cross the equator It is a sure bet I will be high too.>)
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22643
270. drg0dOwnCountry
1:53 AM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting Levi32:


I guess that's what we will find out during the next few decades. I'm betting the earth's temperature will cool at least 1 degree Celsius over the next 30 years due to the cold PDO and the following cold AMO, just as it did in the 1940s through the 1970s. The earth's average temperature has neither increased nor decreased since the 1998 El Nino, which fits in with the PDO which is in the middle of changing-over from warm to cold.


decade GTA AE residual
1880s -0.28 -0.28 +0.00
1890s -0.25 -0.23 -0.02
1900s -0.26 -0.20 -0.05
1910s -0.28 -0.17 -0.10
1920s -0.18 -0.13 -0.04
1930s -0.04 -0.09 +0.05
1940s +0.03 -0.05 +0.08
1950s -0.02 -0.03 +0.01
1960s -0.01 -0.00 -0.01
1970s -0.00 +0.07 -0.07
1980s +0.18 +0.18 -0.01
1990s +0.31 +0.33 -0.02
2000s +0.51 +0.47 +0.04
2010s xx.xx +0.64
Member Since: September 22, 2005 Posts: 11 Comments: 2032
269. hydrus
1:49 AM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting AstroHurricane001:


Vamei came very close to the equator in 2001, but did not cross it. However the pattern I described is far more likely than an equator crossing and a sudden acceleration over 40,000 km in a single day.
LOL! I understood your post, I was trying to get a laugh from you, not dispute you. :)
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22643
268. Levi32
1:49 AM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting AstroHurricane001:


Yes, but off the coast of Peru there are many warm anomalies. The ENSO warm pool is now actually smaller and less intense than the one west of Chile, which is now draining into Pine Island Bay in Antarctica, a major future tipping point for West Antarctica at which the first tipping point has already been passed. How do we know that this is a spike, and that the global temperatures won't just keep accelerating upward, since the solar maximum will arrive in two years after all?


I guess that's what we will find out during the next few decades. I'm betting the earth's temperature will cool at least 1 degree Celsius over the next 30 years due to the cold PDO and the following cold AMO, just as it did in the 1940s through the 1970s. The earth's average temperature has neither increased nor decreased since the 1998 El Nino, which fits in with the PDO which is in the middle of changing-over from warm to cold.
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26700
267. tornadodude
1:47 AM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting AstroHurricane001:


Vamei came very close to the equator in 2001, but did not cross it. However the pattern I described is far more likely than an equator crossing and a sudden acceleration over 40,000 km in a single day.


Lol dude, for real, its obvious he wasnt serious :p and I thought Canadians enjoyed humor
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360
266. Levi32
1:46 AM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting PcolaDan:


I just figured if a low crossed the equator it would automatically become a high. ;)


Lol, well if it did that the satellite images would show a hurricane one second and then clear skies the next :P

The only thing that changes is the force of the coriolis effect that exerts influence on air motion. The hurricane would still be an area of low pressure, but the air rushing towards the center would have a force trying to curve it to the left, instead of the right like in the northern hemisphere. This force would require a bit of time to overcome the inertia of the hurricane which would already be spinning counterclockwise quite fast.
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26700
265. drg0dOwnCountry
1:45 AM GMT on February 26, 2010
Could this be the driest February on record?
05:55 AM Feb 26, 2010
SINGAPORE - This month could turn out to be the driest February ever recorded in Singapore, if current conditions continue.

The National Environment Agency said only 5.3 mm of rainfall has been recorded so far, compared to 18.7 mm in the same period last year.

February is traditionally one of the driest months in the year. And this year, the El Nino effect is making it worst.

A historical comparison: 1968 and 2005 have had the driest Februaries so far, when 8.4 mm of rain fell in each instance.

The Public Utilities Board said the dry spell is also causing record water consumption. Some 590 Olympic-sized pools of water are being consumed daily on average, or about 7 per cent more than last February.

The national water agency is advising households to practise good water-saving habits, such as taking shorter showers.

The dry spell has also seen an increase in the outbreak of grass, lalang and vegetation fires.

The Singapore Civil Defence Force said it has responded to 92 cases so far this month alone, and is appealing to the public to help minimise such fires.
http://www.todayonline.com/Singapore/EDC100226-0000070/Could-this-be-the-driest-February-on-record
Member Since: September 22, 2005 Posts: 11 Comments: 2032
264. homelesswanderer
1:44 AM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting AwakeInMaryland:
217. homelesswanderer 12:27 AM GMT on February 26, 2010

Quoting Bordonaro:
Sad news, a man was killed in Central Park, NYC, NY this afternoon after a large tree branch snapped and fell on him, link to article and video below:

Sad indeed. :( Our trees and branches caved to the weight of the ice storm in 1997. And I'm in Texas! Of course the hurricanes brought the trees down around here. Cats 1,2 and 3. But this goes to show it doesn't take something so drastic to pull them down. I'm sorry to hear that. :(


Bord, Homeless et al. -- I drove past my neighbor's squashed little Toyota (they've already pulled off the downed tree and cut it up... in HUGE pieces). I think my mouth hung open... it looks like one of those Horror stories they show in the drunk-driving classes. There but for the grace of God...

Everyone's fine; no other damages reported but still want to catch my neighbors...maybe bring them soup...or St. John's Wort...


You're a good neighbor. I'm glad everyone's alright. I know what you mean about looking like something from a horror movie. There does seem to be an element of, unreality? I'm sure I just made up that word, but you know what I mean. I remember after Rita, walking up the oak tree on yet another salvage mission, telling my dad, I see this on TV all the time, I just never thought it would be me.

Thanks to the evacuation there weren't any deaths or injuries due to the trees. Around here anyway. That was not the case unfortunately on her outter wind field. :(

If I've learned anything from that it's that trees are heavy! After cutting the root ball and the branches off that giant it still broke that thick chain and nearly toppled the crane, sinking its stablizer feet 3 feet into the ground. How it was finally removed I didn't see. One day the Army corp of engineers came and when I went back it was like nothing was ever there. After all the drama, I think the pressure got to us and the gallows humor came out. We had a saying, Rita didn't blow the houses away. The trees held them down. Lol. I know I'm going to he-double toothpicks for that. :)
Member Since: August 15, 2008 Posts: 10 Comments: 3665
263. AstroHurricane001
1:43 AM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting hydrus:
Yes it can happen, if a storm in the northern hemisphere is downgraded to a tropical disturbance or ( blob ), it is possible for it to cross the equator and once again become a tropical cyclone. Of course it will spin clockwise in the southern hemisphere. It is called Dynamic Fluctuation.....JK! But it could and surely has happened.


Vamei came very close to the equator in 2001, but did not cross it. However the pattern I described is far more likely than an equator crossing and a sudden acceleration over 40,000 km in a single day.
Member Since: August 30, 2008 Posts: 8 Comments: 2835
262. PcolaDan
1:42 AM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting Levi32:


A hurricane can cross hemispheres without becoming nothing and then becoming something again. A storm will not suddenly start rotating clockwise if it crosses the equator into the southern hemisphere. It would keep spinning counter-clockwise until the force of the coriolis effect overpowers the storm's intertia. By this token, if a hurricane were to cross into the opposite hemisphere, it would likely weaken as its circulation is disrupted.

This is like winding up a swing and letting it loose to spin like crazy, but once it fully unwinds and starts going the other direction, it starts slowing down as it encounters resistance from the opposite direction. Eventually the swing stops and begins to rotate the other way.


I just figured if a low crossed the equator it would automatically become a high. ;)
Member Since: August 22, 2008 Posts: 12 Comments: 6010
261. tornadodude
1:42 AM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting hydrus:
It is entirely to fricken cold here. It is forecast to warm a little the next week or so.


well that's a plus
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360
260. Levi32
1:42 AM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting hydrus:
That is what I was trying to convey in few words as possible. When I learn type faster I will elaborate in greater detail my superb knowledge of these mysterious equator-crossing tropical entities.:)


Lol...but unlike what you said, it doesn't need to get downgraded to a blob first before crossing. No invisible barrier is going to stop a hurricane from crossing the equator without being a weak disturbance, and it takes time for the storm to start rotating the other way, if it survives the transition.

It sure would be fun to see :)
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26700
259. hydrus
1:41 AM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting tornadodude:


Hey there, I am great, yourself?

yeah this winter has been snowy :p
It is entirely to fricken cold here. It is forecast to warm a little the next week or so.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22643
258. hydrus
1:38 AM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting Levi32:


A hurricane can cross hemispheres without becoming nothing and then becoming something again. A storm will not suddenly start rotating clockwise if it crosses the equator into the southern hemisphere. It would keep spinning counter-clockwise until the force of the coriolis effect overpowers the storm's intertia. By this token, if a hurricane were to cross into the opposite hemisphere, it would likely weaken as its circulation is disrupted.

This is like winding up a swing and letting it loose to spin like crazy, but once it unwinds and starts going the other direction, it starts slowing down as it encounters resistance from the opposite direction. Eventually the swing stops and begins to rotate the other way.
That is what I was trying to convey in few words as possible. When I learn type faster I will elaborate in greater detail my superb knowledge of these mysterious equator-crossing tropical entities.:)
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22643
257. tornadodude
1:38 AM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting atmoaggie:

What a low-brow comment in a blog mostly occupied by Americans that spend at least some portion of their day staring at weather maps...
(not you, KOTG)


yeah no doubt
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360
256. AstroHurricane001
1:38 AM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting Levi32:


The current SSTs off western South America are generally colder than normal right now, and I see nothing out of the ordinary at all with this El Nino. Keep in mind it is one of the strongest El Ninos ever observed, especially impact-wise, in company with 1998 and 1983. It was expected for the global temperature to spike similarly to 1998.



Yes, but off the coast of Peru there are many warm anomalies. The ENSO warm pool is now actually smaller and less intense than the one west of Chile, which is now draining into Pine Island Bay in Antarctica, a major future tipping point for West Antarctica at which the first tipping point has already been passed. How do we know that this is a spike, and that the global temperatures won't just keep accelerating upward, since the solar maximum will arrive in two years after all?
Member Since: August 30, 2008 Posts: 8 Comments: 2835
255. atmoaggie
1:36 AM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
well i guess 20 percent of americans won't be your friend

What a low-brow comment in a blog mostly occupied by Americans that spend at least some portion of their day staring at weather maps...
(not you, KOTG)
Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 6 Comments: 12463
254. drg0dOwnCountry
1:36 AM GMT on February 26, 2010

Aral gone awry
The Aral Sea, located in Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan in central Asia. Left: 2000. Middle: 2004. Right: 2009. Once one of the largest inland bodies of salty reservoirs in the world and the second largest sea in Asia, the Aral Sea has shrunk dramatically over the last 30 years. One of the main reasons why is crop irrigation: water has been drawn off by upstream feeder streams. As the sea diminishes, noticeable changes in climate conditions and increasing sandstorms are affecting the area.
Credit: Images taken by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite. Courtesy of NASA.
http://climate.nasa.gov/stateOfFlux/index.cfm
Member Since: September 22, 2005 Posts: 11 Comments: 2032
252. tornadodude
1:34 AM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting hydrus:
How are you T-Dude. Just what the N.E. U.S. needed, another massive low pressure area and a couple more feet of snow.


Hey there, I am great, yourself?

yeah this winter has been snowy :p
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360
251. Levi32
1:32 AM GMT on February 26, 2010
Quoting hydrus:
Yes it can happen, if a storm in the northern hemisphere is downgraded to a tropical disturbance or ( blob ), it is possible for it to cross the equator and once again become a tropical cyclone. Of course it will spin clockwise in the southern hemisphere. It is called Dynamic Fluctuation.....JK! But it could and surely has happened.


A hurricane can cross hemispheres without becoming nothing and then becoming something again. A storm will not suddenly start rotating clockwise if it crosses the equator into the southern hemisphere. It would keep spinning counter-clockwise until the force of the coriolis effect overpowers the storm's intertia. By this token, if a hurricane were to cross into the opposite hemisphere, it would likely weaken as its circulation is disrupted.

This is like winding up a swing and letting it loose to spin like crazy, but once it fully unwinds and starts going the other direction, it starts slowing down as it encounters resistance from the opposite direction. Eventually the swing stops and begins to rotate the other way.
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26700
Quoting tornadodude:


LOL!!
How are you T-Dude. Just what the N.E. U.S. needed, another massive low pressure area and a couple more feet of snow.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22643
Quoting AstroHurricane001:


No, tropical cyclones do not randomly teleport across the equator. But the track I've described is actually possible given the current SSTs and jet stream pattern.


Lol why cant they?

Beam me up Scotty
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360
Quoting AstroHurricane001:


No, tropical cyclones do not randomly teleport across the equator. But the track I've described is actually possible given the current SSTs and jet stream pattern.
Yes it can happen, if a storm in the northern hemisphere is downgraded to a tropical disturbance or ( blob ), it is possible for it to cross the equator and once again become a tropical cyclone. Of course it will spin clockwise in the southern hemisphere. It is called Dynamic Fluctuation.....JK! But it could and surely has happened.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22643
pacific ocean is looking a little hostile, i guess winter is not quite over yet!
Member Since: August 11, 2008 Posts: 3 Comments: 1748
We're getting pounded here in CT - slushy snow and now tons'o'rain with no end in sight.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting AstroHurricane001:
Re post #11:

That is almost exactly the pattern I have seen since Super Typhoon Nida cooled the entire North West Pacific basin in late November. Storms brought the ENSO warm pool farther south, threatening several times to cut off the Humboldt Current. Now, refer to post 195 and tell me if you think that the current SST pattern could be caused by anything other than global warming (remember that global temperatures jumped up more than 0.4C from December to January and that the sub-20C zone off western South America is usually up to the central Peruvian coast this time of year).


The current SSTs off western South America are generally colder than normal right now, and I see nothing out of the ordinary at all with this El Nino. Keep in mind it is one of the strongest El Ninos ever observed, especially impact-wise, in company with 1998 and 1983. It was expected for the global temperature to spike similarly to 1998.

Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26700
Quoting hydrus:
Then re-intensified on the 21st to a Cat-3 and moved rapidly over Antarctica causing a moderate storm surge and displacing a few small colonies of penguin.


LOL!!
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360
Quoting hydrus:
Then re-intensified on the 21st to a Cat-3 and moved rapidly over Antarctica causing a moderate storm surge and displacing a few small colonies of penguin.


No, tropical cyclones do not randomly teleport across the equator. But the track I've described is actually possible given the current SSTs and jet stream pattern.
Member Since: August 30, 2008 Posts: 8 Comments: 2835
Re post #11:

That is almost exactly the pattern I have seen since Super Typhoon Nida cooled the entire North West Pacific basin in late November. Storms brought the ENSO warm pool farther south, threatening several times to cut off the Humboldt Current. Now, refer to post 195 and tell me if you think that the current SST pattern could be caused by anything other than global warming (remember that global temperatures jumped up more than 0.4C from December to January and that the sub-20C zone off western South America is usually up to the central Peruvian coast this time of year).
Member Since: August 30, 2008 Posts: 8 Comments: 2835
Astro.....you're out there dude!!!!!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting AstroHurricane001:


What's with the satellite malfunction that occured a few hours ago? By the way if that kind of weather pattern continues then we'll have hurricanes like this:

Hurricane [name] developed in the Caribbean on July 26, strengthening to a category three after passing through the Yucatan Channel and into the Gulf of Mexico. It later curved eastward, making landfall south of Tampa as a category four. The storm continued eastward, weakening to a category two but restrengthening to cat. 4 after passing over the Gulf Stream and stalling over it. The storm made a short counter-clockwise loop and hit Bermuda as a category 3 in early August, before moving southeastwards. By the second week of August, the storm passed through the Canary Islands as a category 1, before weakening to a TS while the broader low pressure system passed through the Strait of Gibratar. The storm restrengthened to a category 2 over the warm waters north of Algeria, hitting Tunis as a cat. 3. The storm stalled over northern Libya, eventually weakening to a depression after dumping rain in drought-stricken areas for three days. The storm later tracked northeastwards by mid-August, bringing record-breaking winds and summer rainfall to Cairo, then continued north, hitting Crete as a cat. 1, then Istanbul as a cat. 2. The hurricane tracked into the Black Sea as a tropical storm, finally making landfall on western Georgia as a category 1 on August 18, causing rapid glacial melt while it dissapated over the Caucasious Mountains on August 20.
Then re-intensified on the 21st to a Cat-3 and moved rapidly over Antarctica causing a moderate storm surge and displacing a few small colonies of penguin.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22643
Quoting Chicklit:

check it out:
BostonRadar


What's with the satellite malfunction that occured a few hours ago? By the way if that kind of weather pattern continues then we'll have hurricanes like this:

Hurricane [name] developed in the Caribbean on July 26, strengthening to a category three after passing through the Yucatan Channel and into the Gulf of Mexico. It later curved eastward, making landfall south of Tampa as a category four. The storm continued eastward, weakening to a category two but restrengthening to cat. 4 after passing over the Gulf Stream and stalling over it. The storm made a short counter-clockwise loop and hit Bermuda as a category 3 in early August, before moving southeastwards. By the second week of August, the storm passed through the Canary Islands as a category 1, before weakening to a TS while the broader low pressure system passed through the Strait of Gibratar. The storm restrengthened to a category 2 over the warm waters north of Algeria, hitting Tunis as a cat. 3. The storm stalled over northern Libya, eventually weakening to a depression after dumping rain in drought-stricken areas for three days. The storm later tracked northeastwards by mid-August, bringing record-breaking winds and summer rainfall to Cairo, then continued north, hitting Crete as a cat. 1, then Istanbul as a cat. 2. The hurricane tracked into the Black Sea as a tropical storm, finally making landfall on western Georgia as a category 1 on August 18, causing rapid glacial melt while it dissapated over the Caucasus Mountains on August 20.
Member Since: August 30, 2008 Posts: 8 Comments: 2835
Quoting AwakeInMaryland:
217. homelesswanderer 12:27 AM GMT on February 26, 2010

Quoting Bordonaro:
Sad news, a man was killed in Central Park, NYC, NY this afternoon after a large tree branch snapped and fell on him, link to article and video below:

Sad indeed. :( Our trees and branches caved to the weight of the ice storm in 1997. And I'm in Texas! Of course the hurricanes brought the trees down around here. Cats 1,2 and 3. But this goes to show it doesn't take something so drastic to pull them down. I'm sorry to hear that. :(


Bord, Homeless et al. -- I drove past my neighbor's squashed little Toyota (they've already pulled off the downed tree and cut it up... in HUGE pieces). I think my mouth hung open... it looks like one of those Horror stories they show in the drunk-driving classes. There but for the grace of God...

Everyone's fine; no other damages reported but still want to catch my neighbors...maybe bring them soup...or St. John's Wort...
What is St John,S Wort? :)
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22643
Quoting AstroHurricane001:


The Mid-Atlantic Ridge runs through the middle of the Atlantic from Svalbard and Iceland to the Antarctic plate. Looks like the majority of Americans are geographically challenged, as 20% can't even identify the USA on a world map.
well i guess 20 percent of americans won't be your friend
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Speaking of earthquakes, there was a 5.6 west of Nicaragua 21 hours ago.
Link
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting AwakeInMaryland:
SOUTHERN MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE
Distances 585 km (365 miles) WSW of Bouvet Island
3060 km (1900 miles) SSW of Cape Town, South Africa


I thought the Southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge was in the Appalachians... I'm SO confused...

Pat, how DID you tape the E-News piece? In'trestin' technique...

P.S. For the first time in my life, I bought a can of southern-style mixed greens...and...and...it's good. Ya'll are definitely rubbin' off on my DC metro beltway-brat damned-to-hell soul...


The Mid-Atlantic Ridge runs through the middle of the Atlantic from Svalbard and Iceland to the Antarctic plate. Looks like the majority of Americans are geographically challenged, as 20% can't even identify the USA on a world map.
Member Since: August 30, 2008 Posts: 8 Comments: 2835

check it out:
BostonRadar
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting cg2916:
I've noticed this winter has been very snowy. Comment, Al Gore?


Not Al Gore, but so far this has been the least snowy season on record for Toronto Pearson, which is south of my location. Also, 2007-2008 was the snowiest season on record, so it looks like the extremes have been swinging around wildly due to global warming and this process is accelerating. This winter, ENSO and AO have forced the jet stream south into the US, dumping all the major storms south of the border (indeed the only major storms here this season, one on January 3 and the current storm, both retrograded with multiple centers after emerging offshore in the Atlantic and tapping into the jet stream to give us major snowfall when combined with snowsqualls.
Member Since: August 30, 2008 Posts: 8 Comments: 2835
SOUTHERN MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE
Distances 585 km (365 miles) WSW of Bouvet Island
3060 km (1900 miles) SSW of Cape Town, South Africa


I thought the Southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge was in the Appalachians... I'm SO confused...

Pat, how DID you tape the E-News piece? In'trestin' technique...

P.S. For the first time in my life, I bought a can of southern-style mixed greens...and...and...it's good. Ya'll are definitely rubbin' off on my DC metro beltway-brat damned-to-hell soul...

P.P.S. We were having a good Blog day...now why did somebody have to start on ol' Al again...
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10-degree Map Centered at 55°S,0°E
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Magnitude 5.4 - SOUTHERN MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE
2010 February 26 00:11:53 UTC




Earthquake Details
Magnitude 5.4
Date-Time

* Friday, February 26, 2010 at 00:11:53 UTC
* Friday, February 26, 2010 at 12:11:53 AM at epicenter

Location 55.908°S, 5.481°W
Depth 15 km (9.3 miles)
Region SOUTHERN MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE
Distances 585 km (365 miles) WSW of Bouvet Island
3060 km (1900 miles) SSW of Cape Town, South Africa
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 22.4 km (13.9 miles); depth +/- 6.5 km (4.0 miles)
Parameters NST= 21, Nph= 22, Dmin=>999 km, Rmss=1.37 sec, Gp= 94°,
M-type=body wave magnitude (Mb), Version=7
Source

* USGS NEIC (WDCS-D)

Event ID us2010teac
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Quoting HadesGodWyvern:
214. cg2916 12:24 AM GMT on February 26, 2010

No longer 17P, huh? Reached T2.0.

---
The 11F is the RSMC Nadi designation number.

Levi:

there was on day that the system was downgraded to a tropical disturbance because of the shear.


Well I looked at satellite imagery for the last 5 days and all I see is a well-defined circulation with convection in at least one semicircle. I didn't see the need to take it down from TD status, but oh well.
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26700
RAAMB PAGE

SH172010 - Tropical Cyclone SEVENTEEN






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earth quake south atlantic ridge
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217. homelesswanderer 12:27 AM GMT on February 26, 2010

Quoting Bordonaro:
Sad news, a man was killed in Central Park, NYC, NY this afternoon after a large tree branch snapped and fell on him, link to article and video below:

Sad indeed. :( Our trees and branches caved to the weight of the ice storm in 1997. And I'm in Texas! Of course the hurricanes brought the trees down around here. Cats 1,2 and 3. But this goes to show it doesn't take something so drastic to pull them down. I'm sorry to hear that. :(


Bord, Homeless et al. -- I drove past my neighbor's squashed little Toyota (they've already pulled off the downed tree and cut it up... in HUGE pieces). I think my mouth hung open... it looks like one of those Horror stories they show in the drunk-driving classes. There but for the grace of God...

Everyone's fine; no other damages reported but still want to catch my neighbors...maybe bring them soup...or St. John's Wort...
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224. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
214. cg2916 12:24 AM GMT on February 26, 2010

No longer 17P, huh? Reached T2.0.

---
The 11F is the RSMC Nadi designation number.

Levi:

there was on day that the system was downgraded to a tropical disturbance because of the shear.
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Quoting AstroHurricane001:
Wow, if we have any hurricanes with tracks like this winter storm, then some cities on the East Coast are in BIG trouble.
<>BRGood grief, good graphic!
Destructive hale and debilitating snowfall!
Some roads and highways may close due to accidents.

Expect flight cancellations ... around New York City and Philadelphia.

Power outages ... as trees and large tree limbs fall and block roads.

Gusts close to hurricane force possible (for) ... western and southern Pennsylvania to the Virginas and the Delmarva. Winds ... strongest in open area, between buildings, on ridges and in the gaps between the mountains.

Gales ... along the New England coast....
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Lots of action from our Sun recently. This is a CME as viewed from SOHO yesterday,,,L8R :)

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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