Stratospheric water vapor decline credited with slowing global warming

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 6:18 PM GMT on January 29, 2010

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After a steep rise in global average temperatures in the 1990s, the 2000s have seen relatively flat temperatures, despite increasing levels of CO2 emissions by humans. This reduced warming may be partially due to a sharp decrease in stratospheric water vapor that began after 2000, according to research published yesterday in Science by a team of researchers led by Dr. Susan Solomon of NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder. Water vapor is a potent greenhouse gas capable of significantly warming the planet, and its potency is much higher when it is located in the lower stratosphere where temperatures are extremely cold. Greenhouse gases located in cold regions of the atmosphere are more effective at heating the planet because they absorb heat radiation from the Earth's relatively warm surface, but then re-emit energy at a much colder temperature, resulting in less heat energy lost to space. Even though stratospheric water vapor can exist at concentrations more than 100 times lower than at the surface, the 10% drop in stratospheric water vapor since 2000 noted by Solomon et al. acted to slow down global warming by 25% between 2000 - 2009, compared to that which would have occurred due only to carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases.


Figure 1. Stratospheric water vapor in the tropics, between 5°S - 5°N, as measured by the HALOE instrument on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), between 1993 - 2005. The bottom portion of the plot shows the lower stratosphere, just above where tall thunderstorms are able to transport water vapor into the stratosphere. A strong yearly cycle is evident in the water vapor, due to the seasonal variation in heavy thunderstorms over the tropics. Once in the lower stratosphere, the waver vapor takes about 1.2 years to travel to the upper stratosphere, as seen in the bending of the contours to the right with height. Note that beginning in 2001, very low water vapor concentrations less than 2.2 parts per million by volume (ppmv) began appearing in the lower stratosphere, due to substantial cooling. Image credit: Rosenlof, K. H., and G. C. Reid (2008), Trends in the temperature and water vapor content of the tropical lower stratosphere: Sea surface connection, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D06107, doi:10.1029/2007JD009109.

The observations
We haven't been able to observe water vapor in the stratosphere very long--accurate global measurements only go back to 1991, when the HALOE instrument aboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) began taking data (Figure 1). Stratospheric water vapor showed an increase of about 0.5 parts per million by volume (ppmv) during the 1990s. But after 2000, a sudden drop of 0.4 ppmv was observed, and this decrease has persisted into 2009. To see how these changes impacted the amount of global warming, Solomon et al. fed the observations into a specialized high-resolution model that computed the change in heat from the fluctuating water vapor levels. They found that the increase in stratospheric water vapor in the 1990s led to about a 30% increase in the amount of global warming observed during that decade, and the decrease of 0.4 ppmv since 2000 led to a 25% reduction between 2000 - 2009.

How water vapor gets into the stratosphere
The stratosphere has two main sources of water vapor: transport from the lower atmosphere (the troposphere) via tall thunderstorms, and the chemical breakdown of methane gas into water vapor and carbon dioxide. With regard to greenhouse effect warming, transport of water vapor by thunderstorms is the most important source, since this mechanism delivers water vapor to the lowest part of the stratosphere, where temperatures are coldest and greenhouse gases are more effective at warming the climate. There is a limit as to how much water vapor that can enter the stratosphere via thunderstorms, though. Temperature decreases with altitude from the surface to the bottom of the stratosphere, where they begin to rise with height due to the solar energy-absorbing effect of the stratospheric ozone layer. As moisture-laden air rises in thunderstorms towards the lower stratosphere, it encounters the atmosphere's "cold point"--the coldest point in the lower atmosphere, at the base of the stratosphere. Since the amount of water vapor that can be present in the atmosphere decreases as the temperature gets colder, and moisture being transported to the stratosphere must traverse through the "cold point" of the atmosphere, the air gets "freeze dried" and loses most of its moisture.


Figure 2. The departure from average of tropopause temperature (dark line) and Sea Surface Temperature (light dashed line) for the tropical Pacific Ocean between 10°S - 10°N, from 1981 - 2007. The tropopause is the bottom boundary of the stratosphere. The SST data is for 139°W - 171°W longitude, and is from the NOAA Optimal Interpolation v2 data set. The tropopause data is from balloon soundings, for the region 171°W - 200°W. The SST is plotted so that the anomalies increase as one looks down. Note that prior to about 2000, tropopause temperatures and SSTs increased and decreased together, but that beginning in 2000 - 2001, a sharp climate shift occurred, and the two quantities became anti-correlated. The sudden drop in tropopause temperature in 2000 - 2001 caused a sharp drop in stratospheric water vapor. Image credit: Rosenlof, K. H., and G. C. Reid (2008), Trends in the temperature and water vapor content of the tropical lower stratosphere: Sea surface connection, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D06107, doi:10.1029/2007JD009109.

Why did stratospheric water vapor drop in 2000?
Tall thunderstorms capable of delivering water vapor into the stratosphere occur primarily in the tropics, particularly over the Western Pacific, where a huge warm pool with very high Sea Surface Temperatures (SSTs) exists. In 2000, this region experienced a sharp increase in SST of 0.25°C, which has remained consistent though the 2000s (Figure 2). Coincident with this increase in SST came a sharp drop in the "cold point" temperature of the tropopause--the lower boundary of the stratosphere. This reduction in "cold point" temperature meant that less water vapor could make it into the stratosphere over the Tropical Pacific, since more thunderstorm water was getting "freeze dried" out. Did global warming trigger this increase in Pacific SST, resulting in cooling of the "cold point" and less water vapor in the stratosphere? Or was it random variation due to some decades-long natural cycle? This key question was left unanswered by the Solomon et al. study, and observations of stratospheric water vapor don't go back far enough to offer a reasonable guess. One factor arguing against global warming having triggered a negative feedback of this nature is that prior to 2000, increases in Western Pacific SST caused increases in "cold point" temperatures--behavior opposite of what has been seen since 2000.

If global warming has triggered the decrease in stratospheric water vapor seen since 2000, it could mean that the climate models have predicted too much global warming, since they don't predict that such a negative feedback exists. On the other hand, if this is a natural cycle, we can expect the recent flattening in global temperatures to average out in the long run, with a return to steeper increases in temperature in the coming decades. Climate models currently do a poor job modeling the complex dynamics of water vapor in the stratosphere, and are not much help figuring out what's going on. Complicating the issue is the fact that about 15% of all thunderstorms capable of delivering water vapor into the stratosphere are generated by tropical cyclones (Rosenlof and Reid, 2008), and tropical cyclones are not well-treated by climate models. We also have to factor in the impact of stratospheric ozone loss, which acts to cool the lower stratosphere. This effect should gradually decrease in future decades as CFC levels decline, though. The stratosphere is a devilishly complicated place that can have a significant impact on global climate change, and we are many years from understanding what is going on there.

References
Romps, D.M., and Z. Kuang, "Overshooting convection in tropical cyclones", Geophysical Research Letters, 2009; 36 (9): L09804 DOI: 10.1029/2009GL037396

Rosenlof, K. H., and G. C. Reid (2008), Trends in the temperature and water vapor content of the tropical lower stratosphere: Sea surface connection, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D06107, doi:10.1029/2007JD009109.

Portlight Haiti update
Paul Timmons, who directs the Portlight.org disaster-relief charity that has sprung up from the hard work and dedication of many members of the wunderground.com community, was interviewed by NBC yesterday. The reporter doing the story is planning to follow the Portlight-donated goods to Haiti and interview the people with disabilities that receive the donations. It is uncertain when the story will be aired, but I'll try to give everyone a heads-up.

Next post
My next post will probably be Tuesday (Groundhog's Day), when I plan to discuss Phil's forecast for the rest of winter. I'll throw in my two cents worth, too.

Jeff Masters

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Quoting xcool:
hi


hey man
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360
702. xcool
hi
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting drg0dOwnCountry:
China Announces the World’s Largest Solar Plant
http://www.inhabitat.com/2009/01/06/china-announces-worlds-largest-solar-plant/

China is set to smash its target for a roll-out of solar power by 2020 more than fivefold and possibly even tenfold, a researcher with the National Development and Reform Commission, the economic planning ministry, said on Tuesday.
Under the NDRC's renewable energy plan set out in 2007, China would have 1,800 megawatts of installed solar capacity by 2020.

But Wang Zhongying, assistant director at the NDRC's Energy Research Institute and head of its Renewable Energy Development Center, said the country was likely to far exceed that.

"The goal that we made originally is probably too low," he said at a solar energy conference in Shanghai. "By 2020, we can reach 10,000 MW or more."

He cited an international aspiration for countries to get 1 percent of electricity from solar by 2020, which would mean a target of 40,000 MW for China, which he said was too high.

"China could reach 10,000 MW or higher, maybe 20,000 MW."

He stressed that the forecast was his own opinion and not an official target.

At the end of 2008, solar power capacity attached to the grid was less than 100 MW, or 0.01 percent of China's entire installed capacity.

China is massively dependent on coal, used to generate around 80 percent of its power, but hopes to lessen coal's dominance by using more hydro, wind, nuclear and biomass.
http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE5440ZU20090505

China, the world’s second-biggest energy consumer, will invest about 100 billion yuan ($14.6 billion) to more than double its wind power capacity by 2010 from last year, a government official said.

The country’s wind power capacity will rise to 30,000 megawatts from 12,000 megawatts

Government Spending

The government has allocated 210 billion yuan for energy- saving and carbon-reduction projects under its 4 trillion-yuan economic stimulus package, the planning commission said in May.

China is separately drafting a long-term plan to develop renewable energy to replace coal and oil with cleaner-burning fuels. Details will be released “soon,” Han Wenke, head of energy research at the commission, said last month.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601072&sid=aX7usNmOCAIE


Maybe this can be a new arms war, ala Reagan, except we save and they spend. Win win for the US.

It's a bet, and no less, right now.

I put my money on mother nature.
Member Since: September 9, 2008 Posts: 6 Comments: 3414
So, GeoffreyWPB came up with a spectacular idea!

Go to my blog, pick the team you think will win the Super Bowl. If your team does not win, then you will donate $10 to Portlight! Great way to raise money for Portlight, have fun, and root on your favorite team!

so get to work! My blog
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360
China Announces the World’s Largest Solar Plant
http://www.inhabitat.com/2009/01/06/china-announces-worlds-largest-solar-plant/

China is set to smash its target for a roll-out of solar power by 2020 more than fivefold and possibly even tenfold, a researcher with the National Development and Reform Commission, the economic planning ministry, said on Tuesday.
Under the NDRC's renewable energy plan set out in 2007, China would have 1,800 megawatts of installed solar capacity by 2020.

But Wang Zhongying, assistant director at the NDRC's Energy Research Institute and head of its Renewable Energy Development Center, said the country was likely to far exceed that.

"The goal that we made originally is probably too low," he said at a solar energy conference in Shanghai. "By 2020, we can reach 10,000 MW or more."

He cited an international aspiration for countries to get 1 percent of electricity from solar by 2020, which would mean a target of 40,000 MW for China, which he said was too high.

"China could reach 10,000 MW or higher, maybe 20,000 MW."

He stressed that the forecast was his own opinion and not an official target.

At the end of 2008, solar power capacity attached to the grid was less than 100 MW, or 0.01 percent of China's entire installed capacity.

China is massively dependent on coal, used to generate around 80 percent of its power, but hopes to lessen coal's dominance by using more hydro, wind, nuclear and biomass.
http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE5440ZU20090505

China, the world’s second-biggest energy consumer, will invest about 100 billion yuan ($14.6 billion) to more than double its wind power capacity by 2010 from last year, a government official said.

The country’s wind power capacity will rise to 30,000 megawatts from 12,000 megawatts

Government Spending

The government has allocated 210 billion yuan for energy- saving and carbon-reduction projects under its 4 trillion-yuan economic stimulus package, the planning commission said in May.

China is separately drafting a long-term plan to develop renewable energy to replace coal and oil with cleaner-burning fuels. Details will be released “soon,” Han Wenke, head of energy research at the commission, said last month.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601072&sid=aX7usNmOCAIE
Member Since: September 22, 2005 Posts: 11 Comments: 2032
Quoting drg0dOwnCountry:
Oss you have a point. But when did they planed those coal plants? We can asume that they will likly shut them down if they can replace those with alternatives.

China has huge problems from environment pollution.

The World's Biggest Green Energy Projects: This month China announced it would build a 2000 MW solar thermal proje....
http://twitter.com/solarthermalmag/statuses/8402408181

Gov't to invest 12 bln yuan in rural environment protection
http://www.china.org.cn/environment/2010-01/29/content_19327530.htm

US can only counter with meassures compared to teh moon program.


How many wind turbines do you think it takes to replace a power plant in the best conditions? Consider the effective wind rates would be there 25% of the time in the best case scenario. Don't get me wrong, I am all for alternatives, but none are even close to being a replacement at this point.

BTW, the answer is 1,700 (big) turbines :)

My apologies to the blog also. I was not going to go GW again here today. I just have a hard time with the mantra some continue with over and over with a crisis pitch. It ain't so folks. That becomes more apparent everyday. Out>
Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8186
Thanks for the updates Aussie, it's appriciated.
Member Since: September 22, 2005 Posts: 11 Comments: 2032
Oss you have a point. But when did they planed those coal plants? We can asume that they will likly shut them down if they can replace those with alternatives.

China has huge problems from environment pollution.

The World's Biggest Green Energy Projects: This month China announced it would build a 2000 MW solar thermal proje....
http://twitter.com/solarthermalmag/statuses/8402408181

Gov't to invest 12 bln yuan in rural environment protection
http://www.china.org.cn/environment/2010-01/29/content_19327530.htm

US can only counter with meassures compared to teh moon program.
Member Since: September 22, 2005 Posts: 11 Comments: 2032
Canberra suffers through its equal hottest January on record
Press Release, Monday February 1, 2010 - 10:52 EDT

After what was already a sweaty start to the summer, Canberra has now just suffered through its equal hottest January in 70 years of records, according to weatherzone.com.au.

Australia’s capital city saw the mercury average 32 degrees for maximum temperatures, four above the norm, a feat equalled only once in Canberra’s records, in 1979. On top of this, Canberra has had four days where the temperature peaked above 38 degrees. The last time this happened was in 1952.

Minimum temperatures were also unusually high this month, with an average of 16 degrees, the warmest in 10 years.

Meteorologist for weatherzone.com.au Samuel Terry helped to shed some light on why Canberra was so hot.

“Across the ACT fresh west to north-westerly winds dominated last month, pushing in all the hot air that’s been brewing over the New South Wales interior. This, in combination with a lack of significant cold fronts, has really helped to keep temperatures right up.”

Rainfall was also an issue last month, with the city only collecting 7 millimetres, as compared to the average 59 millimetres. This makes it the driest January in a quarter of a century.

“The fact that Canberra has had only three days of rain this year is an indication of the severe lack of rain-bearing systems,” Terry said. “It is likely that the current El Nino set-up is having some effect too, causing a lack of moisture in-flow over eastern Australia.”

“The good news is that Canberra will finally receive some good rain over the next week as left-over moisture from Tropical Cyclone Olga makes its way south.”

- Weatherzone
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Perth swelters through January
Monday February 1, 2010 - 10:18 EDT

Perth has recorded its second hottest January ever.

The average temperature for the month was 33.5 degrees, the record from 1962 is 34.5 degrees.

Luke Huntington from the Weather Bureau says it hasn't rained in Perth for more than 70 days, nearing the record for the longest dry-spell ever.

"Running at about 72 days without rain so far," he said.

"We recorded rain back in the 20th of November last year and it looks like the record is about 83 days and there's no rain on the horizon so we should be able to break the record, I reckon."

- ABC
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Heaviest rain in years floods southwest Queensland
Brett Dutschke, Monday February 1, 2010 - 11:30 EDT

Parts of southwest Queensland, including Charleville have had their heaviest rain in years, with in excess of 100 millimetres falling in the last 24 hours.

Since 9am Sunday the Warrego has had widespread 50 to 100mm leading to flooding.

Charleville gained 114mm, their highest 24-hour total in 16 years.

Nearby, The 27 Mile Garden picked up 100mm, an eight-year high and Raceview 105mm, a two-year high. Binnowee and Augathella are also awash with more than 120mm and 70mm respectively.

In the next 24 hours or so rain will ease in the area as the remnants of Tropical Cyclone Olga takes the heaviest falls further southwest.

Rain is developing in northwestern New South Wales and northeastern South Australia and will spread south before the system weakens and rain clears later in the week.

By about Friday northwestern NSW east of about Walgett and north of about Cobar and Wilcannia should have 50 to 100mmm.

Much of this rain is and will be falling in the Murray-Darling catchment which will give the Menindee Lakes and possibly SA another boost.

Ex-Tropical Cyclone Laurence dumped heavy rain in the northern part of the basin just after Christmas which benefited SA's water supply.

- Weatherzone
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676 = China leading, really, when was the last time they told the truth? Really, ya think with these stats? ;)

China Puts Coal (Lots of It) in Copenhagen's Stocking Friday, December 18, 2009

While political leaders and environmental activists are gathered in Copenhagen to talk about carbon footprints, cap-and-trade schemes and a "carbon-constrained world," China continues burning coal at record rates. And that coal consumption means that all of the rhetoric in Copenhagen will largely amount to nothing.

In 2008, China consumed close to 3 billion tons of coal, more than twice that consumed in the U.S., and about 40% of the world consumption that year. From 2000 to 2008, China's coal use jumped by 232% and coal-fired power generation capacity increased by 265%. During that time, coal's share of China's power-generation mix has stayed at about 75%. In 2008, coal provided about 600 gigawatts of power capacity. Of the remaining 193 GW, the vast majority, about 170 GW, was provided by hydroelectric facilities.


Sources: EIA and ChinaPower

According to a recent report by China's powerful National Development and Reform Commission, the country has been increasing its coal-fired generation capacity at a rapid rate, bringing online more than one power plant per week, adding to capacity while replacing less efficient, smaller power plants. With such huge increases in capacity, China will likely be a net coal importer in 2009 for the first time, according to the NDRC estimates. Given coal's dominant position in China's electric sector, there's no doubt that for the next 50 years or so, coal-fired power plants will continue to be major players in the country's generation mix.

Although unable to reduce coal consumption, China is working to reduce pollution from the coal plants and improve their efficiency. About 50GW of small (100 megawatts or less) and inefficient coal-fired power plants in the eastern part of the country were scheduled to be shut down from 2006 to 2010. So far about 90% of this goal has been met.

During the last two years, China has surpassed the United States to become the largest carbon dioxide emitter and about 80% of China's carbon dioxide emissions come from burning coal. Over 50% of China's coal consumption is used for electricity generation (the rest is used for industrial fuel and chemical feedstock), and over 70% of the electricity is used for industrial production.
Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8186
Quoting GeoffreyWPB:
Your blog is it Matt. I went with the Greyhounds and the Saints. If the Colts win, $10 to Portlight.


great, I'm gonna update my blog with the names and who they bet for each time someone decides who they are going for
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360
Your blog is it Matt. I went with the Greyhounds and the Saints. If the Colts win, $10 to Portlight.
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Quoting GeoffreyWPB:
Maybe as a Portlight fundraiser, we could have a Super Bowl prediction contest. Someone could open up their blog, and we can choose who we believe will win the game. If our pick is wrong, we promise to donate $10 to Portlight.


check out my blog
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360
Maybe as a Portlight fundraiser, we could have a Super Bowl prediction contest. Someone could open up their blog, and we can choose who we believe will win the game. If our pick is wrong, we promise to donate $10 to Portlight.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Seastep:


Oh, and take a look at post 134 here
Thanks and yes there is a lot of such concerns. Specialy from land use and certain fertilizer, aerosols etc.

You need energy diversification, natural geo-engeneering solution(biochar), because the released energy emissions already are locked in for the coming decades/centurys and see positive feedbacks (methane).
And we need electromobile technology which goes hand in hand with renewable energy generation (see danmark how this can be done). We need a new energy infrastructure.
Member Since: September 22, 2005 Posts: 11 Comments: 2032
Quoting mobal:
UN climate change panel based claims on student dissertation and magazine article
The United Nations' expert panel on climate change based claims about ice disappearing from the world's mountain tops on a student's dissertation and an article in a mountaineering magazine.

The revelation will cause fresh embarrassment for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which had to issue a humiliating apology earlier this month over inaccurate statements about global warming.

The IPCC's remit is to provide an authoritative assessment of scientific evidence on climate change.

Good article


Oh my goodness, this certainly made me chuckle. Sort of becomes clearer why Al Gore won't debate this topic, eh?
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Quoting GeoffreyWPB:
Hello Mrs. Flood...Saw this on the news...Maybe Portlight would be interested in this:

For Haiti, each box contains a 10-person sleeping tent, water purification tablets; insulated sleeping bags, collapsible 2.1-gallon water carriers; collapsible trenching shovel, rope, hatchet, jack-knife, screwdriver, hammer, hoe-head; multi-fuel stove; ponchos, mosquito-resistant nets, eating utensils, cups, plates, even a children's activity book.


Thanks, Geoffrey! I contacted ShelterBox this afternoon, hoping they can help us with the tent issue. Great minds think alike!! :)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting presslord:


that's pretty cool...


Perhaps Portlight could hook up with this organization and work together. I am so fearful of this upcoming Hurricane season. One hit and I'm afraid it's back to square one.
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Quoting drg0dOwnCountry:
Lindsey Graham: Every day that we delay trying to find a price for carbon is a day that China uses to dominate the green economy.
With 20 million jobs at stake globally, China poured $440 billion into clean energy last year. Our only hope to match them is the bipartisan climate and clean energy jobs bill

Six months ago my biggest worry was that an emissions deal would make American business less competitive compared to China, said Senator Lindsay Graham, a Republican from South Carolina who has been deeply involved in climate change issues in Congress. Now my concern is that every day that we delay trying to find a price for carbon is a day that China uses to dominate the green economy.

He added: China has made a long-term strategic decision and they are going gang-busters.

http://climateprogress.org/2010/01/31/lindsey-graham-price-for-carbon-china-dominate-the-green-econ omy-clean-energy-jobs/


Oh, and take a look at post 134 here
Member Since: September 9, 2008 Posts: 6 Comments: 3414
Quoting drg0dOwnCountry:
Give me some control and i will.


Easy. Again, if there is so much money to be made, there is capital to be had.
Member Since: September 9, 2008 Posts: 6 Comments: 3414
Quoting GeoffreyWPB:
Hello Mrs. Flood...Saw this on the news...Maybe Portlight would be interested in this:

For Haiti, each box contains a 10-person sleeping tent, water purification tablets; insulated sleeping bags, collapsible 2.1-gallon water carriers; collapsible trenching shovel, rope, hatchet, jack-knife, screwdriver, hammer, hoe-head; multi-fuel stove; ponchos, mosquito-resistant nets, eating utensils, cups, plates, even a children's activity book.


that's pretty cool...
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Who will win the Super Bowl? Maybe man's best friend knows. The Colts have the inside one post and the Saints the outside eight post:

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From the blog on Graham's urge to keep up with china.

The moon race propelled the United States to the lunar surface in under a decade. It was driven by fierce competition between two powerful opponents.

The clean energy race could play out in much the same way. If provided the right narrative. JFK challenged the nation to send a man to the moon in under a decade. And the nation responded.

Anyone who cares about a livable climate should adopt similar messaging. Obama’s State of the Union speech and back-and-forth with the GOP was a good start. But the message needs to get amped up big time. Something like this: “China has seen the future of energy technology and they are pursuing it relentlessly. If America does not act, and act soon, we will be forever playing catch up. And risk losing our position of leadership in the world.”

Americans respond to challenges. And America is an intensely patriotic nation. Combine the two and you have a recipe to decarbonize our economy.

The trick is to channel that nationalism in a healthy direction.
http://climateprogress.org/2010/01/31/lindsey-graham-price-for-carbon-china-dominate-the-green-econ omy-clean-energy-jobs/
I have the inteli and skills to be part in such effort.
Member Since: September 22, 2005 Posts: 11 Comments: 2032
Quoting Seastep:


Beat them.
Give me some control and i will.
Member Since: September 22, 2005 Posts: 11 Comments: 2032
Quoting drg0dOwnCountry:
China Leading Global Race to Make Clean Energy

TIANJIN, China — China vaulted past competitors in Denmark, Germany, Spain and the United States last year to become the world’s largest maker of wind turbines, and is poised to expand even further this year.
China has also leapfrogged the West in the last two years to emerge as the world’s largest manufacturer of solar panels. And the country is pushing equally hard to build nuclear reactors and the most efficient types of coal power plants.

These efforts to dominate renewable energy technologies raise the prospect that the West may someday trade its dependence on oil from the Mideast for a reliance on solar panels, wind turbines and other gear manufactured in China.

“Most of the energy equipment will carry a brass plate, ‘Made in China,’ ” said K. K. Chan, the chief executive of Nature Elements Capital, a private equity fund in Beijing that focuses on renewable energy.
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/31/business/energy-environment/31renew.html


Beat them.
Member Since: September 9, 2008 Posts: 6 Comments: 3414
China Leading Global Race to Make Clean Energy

TIANJIN, China — China vaulted past competitors in Denmark, Germany, Spain and the United States last year to become the world’s largest maker of wind turbines, and is poised to expand even further this year.
China has also leapfrogged the West in the last two years to emerge as the world’s largest manufacturer of solar panels. And the country is pushing equally hard to build nuclear reactors and the most efficient types of coal power plants.

These efforts to dominate renewable energy technologies raise the prospect that the West may someday trade its dependence on oil from the Mideast for a reliance on solar panels, wind turbines and other gear manufactured in China.

“Most of the energy equipment will carry a brass plate, ‘Made in China,’ ” said K. K. Chan, the chief executive of Nature Elements Capital, a private equity fund in Beijing that focuses on renewable energy.
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/31/business/energy-environment/31renew.html
Member Since: September 22, 2005 Posts: 11 Comments: 2032
Quoting Bordonaro:
671..I will trade you anyday! It has been below 40F here in Dallas-Ft Worth, TX since 6am Fr morning 1-29-10. It has spent the majority of those hours below freezing. We are supposed to warm up to 53F on Mon 2-1..


Right there with you, Bord! Good for us smokers trying to quit, though - can't stand outside for more than a puff or two!!
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Quoting drg0dOwnCountry:
Lindsey Graham: Every day that we delay trying to find a price for carbon is a day that China uses to dominate the green economy.
With 20 million jobs at stake globally, China poured $440 billion into clean energy last year. Our only hope to match them is the bipartisan climate and clean energy jobs bill

Six months ago my biggest worry was that an emissions deal would make American business less competitive compared to China, said Senator Lindsay Graham, a Republican from South Carolina who has been deeply involved in climate change issues in Congress. Now my concern is that every day that we delay trying to find a price for carbon is a day that China uses to dominate the green economy.

He added: China has made a long-term strategic decision and they are going gang-busters.

http://climateprogress.org/2010/01/31/lindsey-graham-price-for-carbon-china-dominate-the-green-econ omy-clean-energy-jobs/


Go for it!

Govt doesn't drive enterprise here, nor should it.

If there is so much money to be made, venture capitalists will invest.
Member Since: September 9, 2008 Posts: 6 Comments: 3414
671..I will trade you anyday! It has been below 40F here in Dallas-Ft Worth, TX since 6am Fr morning 1-29-10. It has spent the majority of those hours below freezing. We are supposed to warm up to 53F on Mon 2-1..
Member Since: August 25, 2009 Posts: 20 Comments: 6785
Overcast and cool day...Loved it!...Looks like tomorrow will be a bit on the wet side...

Local Text Forecast for
West Palm Beach, FL (33409)

Jan 31 Tonight
Considerable cloudiness. Occasional rain showers after midnight. Low 64F. Winds NE at 10 to 20 mph. Chance of rain 40%.
Feb 1 Tomorrow
Showers early then thundershowers developing later in the day. High 71F. Winds E at 10 to 20 mph. Chance of rain 70%. Locally heavier rainfall possible.
Feb 1 Tomorrow night
Overcast with rain showers at times. Thunder possible. Low 67F. Winds ESE at 10 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 60%.
Feb 2 Tuesday
Scattered thunderstorms. Highs in the upper 70s and lows in the upper 50s.
Feb 3 Wednesday
Partly cloudy. Highs in the low 70s and lows in the low 60s.
Feb 4 Thursday
Occasional showers possible. Highs in the mid 70s and lows in the upper 60s.
Feb 5 Friday
Partly cloudy, chance of a thunderstorm. Highs in the mid 70s and lows in the low 60s.
Feb 6 Saturday
Chance of showers. Highs in the low 70s and lows in the mid 50s.
Feb 7 Sunday
Partly cloudy. Highs in the low 70s and lows in the low 50s.
Feb 8 Monday
Mainly sunny. Highs in the low 70s and lows in the low 50s.
Feb 9 Tuesday
Abundant sunshine. Highs in the low 70s and lows in the upper 50s.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting transitzone:

You shoulda been here (Fort Worth) in 1980 - we did 69 days over 100, hit 113 twice


Hello, all!

I know I'm 2 hours late to this discussion, but I just had to comment on the 1980 heat wave. I lived in Austin, was VERY pregnant with my first child, driving a car with no a/c. Came home from work one evening, about 7PM, about 112 degrees in the shade. Lo and behold, no a/c in my apartment. It took nearly a full week to get it fixed. Labor and delivery was nothing compared to that misery! I've always wondered if that oppressive heat wasn't the reason my son arrived 4 weeks early!
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Quoting 1900hurricane:

Yeah, strangely enough, Texas was one of only a handful hot spots the past summer. We must have been in a bubble or something... :P

You were under that upper level high that we were stuck under for the month of June.
Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 6 Comments: 12463
668. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
At 18:00 PM UTC, Tropical Depression 07 (996 hPa) located at 11.5S 168.4W has 10 minute sustained winds of 25-30 knots close to the center possibly increasing to 35 knots within 60 to 120 NM of the center in sectors from northesat through southeast in the next 24 hours. The depression is reported as moving east at 15 knots. Position POOR based on multispectral enhanced infrared radar/visible imagery with animation and peripheral surface observations.

Overall organization improved past 12 hours. Deep convection erupted over low level circulation center overnight but warmed past 3 hours due to diurnal influence. Primary band to north trying to wrap around low level circulation center against existing shear. CIMSS indicate increasing shear a little further to the east of track. System located under diffluent region at 250 HPA. Outflow developing to east and north. Sea surface temperature is around 30C.

Dvorak based on wrap of 0.4 on LOG10 spiral yielding DT2.5. PT=2.0 and MET=2.5, FT based on DT and MET.

Dvorak Intensity: T2.5/2.5/D1.5/24 HRS.

Depression steered east by low to mid level west to northwest flow associated with monsoon trough. Some global models has captured the system and generally agree on eastward track before a southeast turn in the next 36 to 48 hours.

Potential for this system to develop into a tropical cyclone in the next 24-48 hours is MODERATE TO HIGH.

The next Tropical Disturbance Advisory will be issued at around 02:30 AM (Monday)
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China has an advantage already. And know what, they might know why it is so importend.(beside climate change)

Talking about peak oil and such ...

Oil companies hit by 'state' cyber attacks
Petrol reserves data targeted
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/01/25/oil_companies_attacked/
Member Since: September 22, 2005 Posts: 11 Comments: 2032
Lindsey Graham: Every day that we delay trying to find a price for carbon is a day that China uses to dominate the green economy.
With 20 million jobs at stake globally, China poured $440 billion into clean energy last year. Our only hope to match them is the bipartisan climate and clean energy jobs bill

Six months ago my biggest worry was that an emissions deal would make American business less competitive compared to China, said Senator Lindsay Graham, a Republican from South Carolina who has been deeply involved in climate change issues in Congress. Now my concern is that every day that we delay trying to find a price for carbon is a day that China uses to dominate the green economy.

He added: China has made a long-term strategic decision and they are going gang-busters.

http://climateprogress.org/2010/01/31/lindsey-graham-price-for-carbon-china-dominate-the-green-econ omy-clean-energy-jobs/
Member Since: September 22, 2005 Posts: 11 Comments: 2032
US cold summer anomaly 2009

In addition, popular belief that the world is cooling is reinforced by cold
weather anomalies in the United States in the summer of 2009 and cold anomalies in much of
the Northern Hemisphere in December 2009
.
http://solveclimate.com/blog/20100129/if-its-warm-how-come-its-so-darned-cold

Article featuring cold/warm anomalies, see linked pdf for above statement.
Member Since: September 22, 2005 Posts: 11 Comments: 2032
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
49 days till spring

Thanks KOG. The average day of our last freeze is Mar 14, first freeze is Nov 22, for a growing season of 248 days, 8 months and 8 days. Brownsville, TX about 400mi to our south has a 363 day growing season.
Member Since: August 25, 2009 Posts: 20 Comments: 6785
Quoting Bordonaro:


Thanks Chucktown. I have more than had my fill of winter here in Arlington, TX. I am ready for spring to show up!
49 days till spring
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662. mobal
UN climate change panel based claims on student dissertation and magazine article
The United Nations' expert panel on climate change based claims about ice disappearing from the world's mountain tops on a student's dissertation and an article in a mountaineering magazine.

The revelation will cause fresh embarrassment for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which had to issue a humiliating apology earlier this month over inaccurate statements about global warming.

The IPCC's remit is to provide an authoritative assessment of scientific evidence on climate change.

Good article
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Quoting FLPandhandleJG:


ouch i hear ya.. its like we go to real cold, then strong storm / alot of rain, and get a lil warm break.. while keeps flip flopping like this, its hard to keep the cold and summer weather clothes out at once.. one week we be warm then air comes the cold air lol.. wacky weather.. yuck!


North Texas in the winter is sandwiched in between mild sub-tropical air over far S TX and the Continental Polar airmass to our north. The average January temps for Dallas-Ft Worth, TX are 35/56F. That means we will see winter and spring/fall like temps. In Arlington, TX the low for January was 13F, the high was 79F. That is a wild 66F temp range. And the funny part is the DFW AP will report the Jan 2010 data tomorrow, and we are probably right at normal!

So far we are 0.6F above normal. We have had 14 days below normal, including today, which was 13F below normal; 16 days above normal and 1 day was actually normal.
Member Since: August 25, 2009 Posts: 20 Comments: 6785
Quoting Chucktown:


Actually, I don't see much arctic air for Texas during that time frame. There will be some cold air east of the Mississippi as that coastal departs, but right now doesn't look like much out of the ordinary for February.


Thanks Chucktown. I have more than had my fill of winter here in Arlington, TX. I am ready for spring to show up!
Member Since: August 25, 2009 Posts: 20 Comments: 6785
Quoting Bordonaro:


I understand that you're a meteorologist. How severe will the Arctic outbreak be in the 2-9 through 2-11 time frame? I am here in Dallas-Ft Worth, TX. Thanks.


Actually, I don't see much arctic air for Texas during that time frame. There will be some cold air east of the Mississippi as that coastal departs, but right now doesn't look like much out of the ordinary for February.
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Quoting Bordonaro:


JG it has not hit 40F here in the Dallas-Ft Worth area since late Th 1-28-10. It's been between 26-39F since then, with 3.40" of rain in Grand Prairie, TX a few miles from my place. It's now 39F, overcast and miserable!

I am doing well, looking for the sun!!


ouch i hear ya.. its like we go to real cold, then strong storm / alot of rain, and get a lil warm break.. while keeps flip flopping like this, its hard to keep the cold and summer weather clothes out at once.. one week we be warm then air comes the cold air lol.. wacky weather.. yuck!
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Quoting FLPandhandleJG:


i guess we will c in a few more days.. but how u doing Bob? On the el nino part, I still believe theres sum moisture to play with for a few weeks.. not as strong as we have seen it but still sum left.. as sum models point more moisture coming to the south every 3 to 4 days..


JG it has not hit 40F here in the Dallas-Ft Worth area since late Th 1-28-10. It's been between 26-39F since then, with 3.40" of rain in Grand Prairie, TX a few miles from my place. It's now 39F, overcast and miserable!

I am doing well, looking for the sun!!
Member Since: August 25, 2009 Posts: 20 Comments: 6785
Quoting Bordonaro:


Too early to call, but it is going to be a sizeable and nasty chunk of Arctic air, that's for sure.


i guess we will c in a few more days.. but how u doing Bob? On the el nino part, I still believe theres sum moisture to play with for a few weeks.. not as strong as we have seen it but still sum left.. as sum models point more moisture coming to the south every 3 to 4 days..
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Quoting Chucktown:
Just a heads up to everyone in the Mid-Atlantic for next weekend - Could be a pretty substanstial snowfall for the same areas that got snow yesterday - GFS has consistently "bombed" a storm off Hatteras on Super Sunday - Could cutoff and be rather prolonged - Looks like a chilly Super Bowl in Miami - Dry, but highs only in the 50's.


I understand that you're a meteorologist. How severe will the Arctic outbreak be in the 2-9 through 2-11 time frame? I am here in Dallas-Ft Worth, TX. Thanks.
Member Since: August 25, 2009 Posts: 20 Comments: 6785
Quoting FLPandhandleJG:
Heyyy Peeps.. looks like we might get another similar cold air blast near the 10th of February for 2/3 of consus again.. the question is, will it b near as strong as the last artic blast in January 2010.. ?


Too early to call, but it is going to be a sizeable and nasty chunk of Arctic air, that's for sure.
Member Since: August 25, 2009 Posts: 20 Comments: 6785
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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