A new world record wind gust: 253 mph in Australia's Tropical Cyclone Olivia

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 5:34 PM GMT on January 27, 2010

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The 6,288-foot peak of New Hampshire's Mount Washington is a forbidding landscape of wind-swept barren rock, home to some of planet Earth's fiercest winds. As a 5-year old boy, I remember being blown over by a terrific gust of wind on the summit, and rolling out of control towards a dangerous drop-off before a fortuitously-placed rock saved me. Perusing the Guinness Book of World Records as a kid, three iconic world weather records always held a particular mystique and fascination for me: the incredible 136°F (57.8°C) at El Azizia, Libya in 1922, the -128.5°F (-89.2°C) at the "Pole of Cold" in Vostok, Antarctica in 1983, and the amazing 231 mph wind gust (103.3 m/s) recorded in 1934 on the summit of Mount Washington, New Hampshire. Well, the legendary winds of Mount Washington have to take second place now, next to the tropical waters of northwest Australia. The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has announced that the new world wind speed record at the surface is a 253 mph (113.2 m/s) wind gust measured on Barrow Island, Australia. The gust occurred on April 10, 1996, during passage of the eyewall of Category 4 Tropical Cyclone Olivia.


Figure 1. Instruments coated with rime ice on the summit of Mt. Washington, New Hampshire. Image credit: Mike Theiss.

Tropical Cyclone Olivia
Tropical Cyclone Olivia was a Category 4 storm on the U.S. Saffir-Simpson scale, and generated sustained winds of 145 mph (1-minute average) as it crossed over Barrow Island off the northwest coast of Australia on April 10, 1996. Olivia had a central pressure of 927 mb and an eye 45 miles in diameter at the time, and generated waves 21 meters (69 feet) high offshore. According to Black et al. (1999), the eyewall likely had a tornado-scale mesovortex embedded in it that caused the extreme wind gust of 253 mph. The gust was measured at the standard measuring height of 10 meters above ground, on ground at an elevation of 64 meters (210 feet). A similar mesovortex was encountered by a Hurricane Hunter aircraft in Hurricane Hugo of 1989, and a mesovortex was also believed to be responsible for the 239 mph wind gust measured at 1400 meters by a dropsonde in Hurricane Isabel in 2003. For reference, 200 mph is the threshold for the strongest category of tornado, the EF-5, and any gusts of this strength are capable of causing catastrophic damage.


Figure 2. Visible satellite image of Tropical Cyclone Olivia a few hours before it crossed Barrow Island, Australia, setting a new world-record wind gust of 253 mph. Image credit: Japan Meteorological Agency.


Figure 3. Wind trace taken at Barrow Island, Australia during Tropical Cyclone Olivia. Image credit: Buchan, S.J., P.G. Black, and R.L. Cohen, 1999, "The Impact of Tropical Cyclone Olivia on Australia's Northwest Shelf", paper presented at the 1999 Offshore Technology Conference in Houston, Texas, 3-6 May, 1999.

Why did it take so long for the new record to be announced?
The instrument used to take the world record wind gust was funded by a private company, Chevron, and Chevron's data was not made available to forecasters at Australia's Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) during the storm. After the storm, the tropical cyclone experts at BOM were made aware of the data, but it was viewed as suspect, since the gusts were so extreme and the data was taken with equipment of unknown accuracy. Hence, the observations were not included in the post-storm report. Steve Buchan from RPS MetOcean believed in the accuracy of the observations, and coauthored a paper on the record gust, presented at the 1999 Offshore Technology Conference in Houston (Buchan et al., 1999). The data lay dormant until 2009, when Joe Courtney of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology was made aware of it. Courtney wrote up a report, coauthored with Steve Buchan, and presented this to the WMO extremes committee for ratification. The report has not been made public yet, and is awaiting approval by Chevron. The verified data will be released next month at a World Meteorological Organization meeting in Turkey, when the new world wind record will become official.

New Hampshire residents are not happy
Residents of New Hampshire are understandably not too happy about losing their cherished claim to fame. The current home page of the Mount Washington Observatory reads, "For once, the big news on Mount Washington isn't our extreme weather. Sadly, it's about how our extreme weather--our world record wind speed, to be exact--was outdone by that of a warm, tropical island".

Comparison with other wind records
Top wind in an Atlantic hurricane: 239 mph (107 m/s) at an altitude of 1400 meters, measured by dropsonde in Hurricane Isabel (2003).
Top surface wind in an Atlantic hurricane: 211 mph (94.4 m/s), Hurricane Gustav, Paso Real de San Diego meteorological station in the western Cuban province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba, on the afternoon of August 30, 2008.
Top wind in a tornado: 302 mph (135 m/s), measured via Doppler radar at an altitude of 100 meters (330 feet), in the Bridge Creek, Oklahoma tornado of May 3, 1999.
Top surface wind not associated with a tropical cyclone or tornado: 231 mph (103.3 m/s), April 12, 1934 on the summit of Mount Washington, New Hampshire.
Top wind in a typhoon: 191 mph (85.4 m/s) on Taiwanese Island of Lanyu, Super Typhoon Ryan, Sep 22, 1995; also on island of Miyakojima, Super Typhoon Cora, Sep 5, 1966.
Top surface wind not measured on a mountain or in a tropical cyclone: 207 mph (92.5 m/s) measured in Greenland at Thule Air Force Base on March 6, 1972.
Top wind measured in a U.S. hurricane: 186 mph (83.1 m/s) measured at Blue Hill Observatory, Massachusetts, during the 1938 New England Hurricane.

References
Buchan, S.J., P.G. Black, and R.L. Cohen, 1999, "The Impact of Tropical Cyclone Olivia on Australia's Northwest Shelf", paper presented at the 1999 Offshore Technology Conference in Houston, Texas, 3-6 May, 1999.

Black, P.G., Buchan, S.J., and R.L. Cohen, 1999, "The Tropical Cyclone Eyewall Mesovortex: A Physical Mechanism Explaining Extreme Peak Gust Occurrence in TC Olivia, 4 April 1996 on Barrow Island, Australia", paper presented at the 1999 Offshore Technology Conference in Houston, Texas, 3-6 May, 1999.

Jeff Masters

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Thank you Astro for this great report.
I'd like to suggest to collect those also, seperatly in a blog aswell.

Member Since: September 22, 2005 Posts: 11 Comments: 2032
GFS has a powerful storm for S. Ontario at the end of its model run:

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Quoting Jeff9641:


Yeah same for Florida as well. Tremendous rain is on tap for Florida and California. This nice weather in C FL is about to go by by for a while. Very typical of a strong El-Nino. February and March appear to be very wet From California to Florida. For the last two months combine I've picked up 9.95" of rain in Longwood just north of Orlando.


Is it supposed to be rainy all of next week? I looked at the Accuweather 15-day forecast (even though it's never accurate)and it has rain on Saturday and that's about it.
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Part 1 of 13 at youtube.
Member Since: September 22, 2005 Posts: 11 Comments: 2032
Quoting leftovers:
i heard 4000 starting feb


Correct.
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Quoting drg0dOwnCountry:
There is a great video if you follow the link, one of the engeeners is speaking there aswell (the one who solved the Houston problem).


ok cool, thanks! :)
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360
Quoting hydrus:
That is interesting to me Flood. Using the anemometer recording over the Doppler radar. Doppler is a multi-million dollar unit, but they use an anemometer which may cost a couple hundred bucks for official readings. What type of wind speed indicator was it that could withstand 253-mph winds? How can they prove that was the actual windspeed after the equipment took such a beating? WHY did it take them approximately 14 years to authenticate this?


The information and the weather station was owned by a private company; it took quite a while to get the data from them and then they had to verify the equipment was and could have been accurate. As for the doppler readings, they are extrapolated wind speeds with a fair margin of error built into them. Even a cop's radar gun will give a really erroneous reading from time to time (I'm not really comparing a radar gun to a Doppler radar station, but the principle is similar). An anemometer is there, a mechanical device that measures the speed of the wind...I agree though, I want to know how that anemometer was anchored to be able to withstand winds of that speed...I've "stood up" in 80 mph winds; it's more like leaning into the wind at about a 45 degree angle
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Quoting tornadodude:


Purdue has a great history regarding the trips to the Moon and flight overall
There is a great video if you follow the link, one of the engeeners is speaking there aswell (the one who solved the Houston problem).
Member Since: September 22, 2005 Posts: 11 Comments: 2032
Quoting hydrus:
That is interesting to me Flood. Using the anemometer recording over the Doppler radar. Doppler is a multi-million dollar unit, but they use an anemometer which may cost a couple hundred bucks for official readings. What type of wind speed indicator was it that could withstand 253-mph winds? How can they prove that was the actual windspeed after the equipment took such a beating? WHY did it take them approximately 14 years to authenticate this?


One of the mets down at NWS Ruskin explained to me that because doppler is looking 'up' into the storm, the gusts will be higher than those measured at ground level.

The 'ideal' is an anemometer mounted 10 m above the surface. You are right - many anemometers fail at high speeds.

Also, the anemometer has to survive the event and have its calibration verified. Many anemometers give high readings, but are later destroyed and can't be inspected later.

I read that the Mt. Washington unit was called a hot-wire anemometer. A pretty interesting instrument...

http://www.efunda.com/designstandards/sensors/hot_wires/hot_wires_intro.cfm
Member Since: June 20, 2005 Posts: 22 Comments: 1054

744
fxus62 ktae 271855
afdtae


Area forecast discussion
National Weather Service Tallahassee Florida
200 PM EST Wednesday Jan 27 2010



Long term (saturday through next wednesday)...the large scale
pattern is transitioning to a lower amplitude across the Continental U.S. As
the flow across the Pacific becomes more zonal. Significant energy
will remain in the southern stream...and several vigorous short
waves will progress eastward across Continental U.S. During the extended
period. Timing is always more of a problem in fast moving low
amplitude flow situations...and the European model (ecmwf) remains slower than the
GFS...and given the recent forecast trends will favor a blend that
is weighted towards the timing of the European model (ecmwf). The first system will
sweep across the area Friday night and Saturday...producing
widespread rain and thunderstorms ahead of a strong cold front.
While dynamics look strong with this system...model trends have been
slower with a more southern track of the surface low. The further
south the low tracks the more limited will be any northward
penetration of significantly unstable air...especially given
offshore water temperatures. Will indicate rain with some thunder.
Cannot rule out the possibility of isolated severe storms so will
have to monitor developments as we get closer in time to the event.
High pressure builds across the area Saturday afternoon and
Sunday...then shifts eastward on Monday...ahead of the next system
approaching from the west...bringing with it more rain for Tuesday.
High pressure then rebuilds across the area on Wednesday.
Temperatures will start our near climatology...fall below climatology Sunday and
Monday...then return to near climatology by the middle of the week. Also
cant rule out the possibility of temperatures dropping to near
freezing in normal colder areas on Sunday and Monday morning.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 427 Comments: 129452
Quoting drg0dOwnCountry:
Lunar Mission Xprize

http://www.googlelunarxprize.org/


International Team (3 of 5 Appolo Engeneers joined).
http://events.ccc.de/congress/2009/Fahrplan/events/3332.en.html


Purdue has a great history regarding the trips to the Moon and flight overall
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360
Lunar Mission Xprize

http://www.googlelunarxprize.org/


International Team (3 of 5 Appolo Engeneers joined).
http://events.ccc.de/congress/2009/Fahrplan/events/3332.en.html
Member Since: September 22, 2005 Posts: 11 Comments: 2032
The Southern Hemisphere tropics are waking up. Note that I've tried to keep this comment short, but the images were stretching it a little too much.

Tropical Storm Olga is currently at tropical storm strength, but at the rate of strengthening it could easily strengthen into a category four by the time it reaches the southeastern end of the Gulf of Carpentaria:



However, there's a catch. While the core circulation of Olga remains over land near the southwestern part of the GoC, the main convection is actually situated over land, in the Northern Territory of Australia, not far from Darwin. That's right, the storm's convection actually strengthened over land, and currently it is heading northwest, towards open water.



The water SSTs just offshore where it will likely enter the oceans is a warm 30C, which gives the convection the ability to strengthen on its own rapidly, considering how quickly it flared up over land. This means that Olga will likely split into two.



Now, from the global SST map, you'll notice something else. Another tropical cyclone, TC Ten, has developed in the South Pacific, east of Fiji. Believe it or not, this is the "doom" cyclone that I had been fearing since the end of December, despite the fact that it will not track over many populated areas. I may be exaggerating, so there is no reason to panic. However, the storm has the Cook Islands and part of French Polynesia directly in its path, and the storm will likely be a strong category 1 or weak cat. 2 by the time it reaches that area. This storm is about 10 degrees wide in terms of lat/long diameter, and the storm surge it produces could easily overwhelm the shores of those small islands and atolls. In the SST map, the western part of the El Nino-Walker warm pool has a deep gash in its 30C+ zone. The cyclone is expected to reach the eastern end of that zone by the end of its 3-day forecast:



However, in about five days, the cyclone will be farther east than any South Pacific cyclone in record history, if it is able to make it past the 140W line, with shear up to 40-50 kts. Up to that point, if the storm survives as a tropical system, which it might due to its size, convection and predicted intensity, it will encounter waters at 28C. Cyclone Mick in mid-December did not make it past that point, and it was larger, but it failed not due to shear but due to steering winds, which pulled it toward Antarctica. However, it along with two other extratropical storm systems pulled water from the ENSO warm pool southward, forming the South Pacific warm anomaly bulge.



As can be seen on this SST anomalies map, the "bulge" warm anomaly now extends from 180W to 110W, and from 30S to 70S. TC Ten, or the remnants of it, will curve sharply southward around 120W due to steering winds around the western end of the high pressure system that drives the Humboldt Current, and at this point the cyclone will run out of 26C+ warm water. However, it will then enter the warm tongue poised toward Chile, at the zone of the ENSO warm pool-Humboldt cut-off zone, where the warmest anomalies are currently +3.5C. Of course, the clockwise rotation around the cyclone could pool warm water toward that southeastern warm tongue, strengthening it. Forecasts already predict that a warm tongue of water in that area will strengthen in about a week, shortly before the Cyclone could enter the area, but already it is strengthening. One day before the SST anomalies image was produced, the warmest part of that southeastern tongue was only about +3.0C from normal. After entering the warm zone, if the cyclone's remnants track south of the warmest anomalies, the anomalies will rapidly intensify. However, if the storm tracks farther north, the anomalies will be pushed back. This depends on the storm's interaction with the high pressure system. At 100W, the storm would be at the longitude of Pine Island Bay. If the storm or part of it tracks southward, more warm water will be pulled toward that weak underbelly of West Antarctica. If the storm makes landfall in Chile near 40S, then the southeastern tongue will completely cut off the Humboldt Current. SSTs at that location are currently near 16C, but if the aforementioned scenario takes place then the area could warm to 23C in a few days. This would cut off the Humboldt south of its strongest point, and disrupt global ocean currents entirely. After that, the storm would track southward, toward the low pressure systems in Antarctica, and bring warm anomalies to the Antarctic Peninsula and the Wilkins Ice Shelf. 8C water came close to the Antarctic Peninsula around two weeks ago, before retreating back. Warm anomalies up to +2C persist in the area of Wilkins that melted last year.



Above is a map of the South Pacific Gyre. Since late November, the northeastern part of teh Humboldt's cool zone, the isotherm at 20C has been retreating steadily southward. The current rebounded earlier in the month, preventing the ENSO-Humboldt cut-off from actually disrupting the Humboldt at its source. However, this scenario looks different, unless TC Ten completely dissipates due to shear and dry air. Even then, its circulation would fuel the South Pacific warm anomaly by drawing the remaining ENSO warm pool waters into it, speeding up melting in Antarctica.

This is not an ordinary El Nino. If it was, we would not expect the different oscillations and storms to produce a co-reinforcing yet erratic cycle. It may even no longer be accurate to say that global warming is occuring just every year, as this scenario could not happen under natural circumstances, but indeed it could now be progressing every day or even every hour.
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Quoting Floodman:


You are correct, sir...being doppler based the margin for error takes it out of the running for the record
That is interesting to me Flood. Using the anemometer recording over the Doppler radar. Doppler is a multi-million dollar unit, but they use an anemometer which may cost a couple hundred bucks for official readings. What type of wind speed indicator was it that could withstand 253-mph winds? How can they prove that was the actual windspeed after the equipment took such a beating? WHY did it take them approximately 14 years to authenticate this?
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Quoting GodisinControl:


this is a bad idea to send more job overseas


Not that, they wont send any jobs anywhere.
Thousands and thousands of jobs associated with NASA will be lost. Huntsville,
the Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans (Built the shuttle tanks), Johnson Space Center in Houston,
Kennedy Space Center, and countless other places.
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Quoting Patrap:
HUGE BREAKING NOLA STORY



Louisiana awarded $474.7 million in Charity Hospital dispute
By Jan Moller, The Times-Picayune
January 27, 2010, 10:12AM

A federal arbitration panel has awarded Louisiana $474.7 million in compensation for hurricane-related damage to Charity Hospital, ending a long-standing dispute with the federal government and giving the state a substantial boost in its efforts to build a new teaching hospital in lower Mid-City.


The ruling from the Civilian Board of Contract Appeals is a victory for state officials, who had been seeking $492 million. Money from the settlement will go toward construction of a 424-bed, $1.2 billion hospital that would be build adjacent to a new U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs hospital.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency had valued the damage from Hurricane Katrina at $124 million and offered to settle the matter for $150 million


Glad to see the hospital I was born in will be rebuilt. At least I'll still have a little physical connection to my birth city. Homes on Dauphine St. (9th Ward), Culotta(Chalmette) and Lancelot (east of the Canall off the Chef) are all gone. Thank God the Quarter and the Cafe du Mond didn't go, I sure likes me some cafe au lait and beignets!

Speaking of weather, I keep hearing of a major rain event here in NE FL...any details?
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Quoting eyesontheweather:
Anyone....I have been recieving varying degrees regarding the impending "ICE STORM" here in NE Oklahoma. Local Mets say it is yet to be determined as the low off of CA has not established that track it will follow; Where as TWC is saying it could be 1/2 to 1 in of ice in this area. Anyone with conclusive info on this ice event?


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press---interesting article re: new generation of amputees.

Link
Member Since: August 22, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 1462
but this time the ground is so wet it wont take the rain we will see a lot of flooding next week looks like a 1997 flood is on the way
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the GFS are forcasting a lot of rain snow wind you name it it looks like CA will see the same thing we saw last week all overe
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Quoting AwakeInMaryland:


OH, HOW COOL IS THIS?!!

Shout out to Colts/SAINT'S fans going to Miami to the Super Bowl...there's a 94th Aerosquadron Restaurant in Miami, and according to their website, they're helping in Haiti!

The food is/was great (I've only been to the one that was in College Park...I see that according to Flood, the food was great in St. Louis, too...and reasonable for a "nice" dinner out!!

Once and again, thanks for link, T-dude...

94th Aerosquadron Restaurant, Miami


no problem! might have to make a trip over to Illinois to try it out sometime!

Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360
Quoting CybrTeddy:
Breaking News Story, Constellation to be canceled, moon in doubt.


Fox News
Orlando Sentinel



wow, they want to discontinue the program and outsource to other governments (like Russia)

"According to a report in the Orlando Sentinel, the forthcoming budget -- which the president will announce in detail during Wednesday night's State of the Union address -- will include no funding for lunar landers, no moon bases, and no Constellation program at all. Instead, NASA will outsource space flight to other governments (such as the Russians) and private companies."
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360
Quoting tornadodude:


there are actually only 4 of them, well 3 now

link


OH, HOW COOL IS THIS?!!

Shout out to Colts/SAINT'S fans going to Miami to the Super Bowl...there's a 94th Aerosquadron Restaurant in Miami, and according to their website, they're helping in Haiti!

The food is/was great -- I've only been to the one that was in College Park...I see that according to Flood, the food was great in St. Louis, too...and reasonable for a "nice" dinner out!!

Once and again, thanks for link, T-dude...

94th Aerosquadron Restaurant, Miami

P.S. I will report any nasty WU-mail for recommending a restaurant that is helping in Haiti. I've had about enough of that. Any help is good help.

I'm posting mainly on my own blog, and friends. So lay off. I've made mistakes, but I'm just doing the best I can, trying to do the next right thing. Get the message? This place is starting to change me; for the worse, I'm afraid.

I already posted the Day of Atonement; and an entry from another family faith...I try to take the best from the rest. I've already asked forgiveness from those that rate...
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Breaking News Story, Constellation to be canceled, moon in doubt.


Fox News
Orlando Sentinel

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Quoting tornadodude:


anytime, looks like a lot of sleet, makes for fun driving
I have tire chains not to worried about that aspect. being without electricity for extended period has me greatly concerned as I live waaaaay out in the country
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Quoting eyesontheweather:
Post 51; Thank you


anytime, looks like a lot of sleet, makes for fun driving
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360
Post 51; Thank you
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Winter Storm Warning

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE TULSA OK
1123 AM CST WED JAN 27 2010

ARZ001-002-010-011-OKZ054>071-280130-
/O.CON.KTSA.WS.W.0001.100128T1200Z-100129T1800Z/
BENTON-CARROLL-WASHINGTON AR-MADISON-OSAGE-WASHINGTON OK-NOWATA-
CRAIG-OTTAWA-PAWNEE-TULSA-ROGERS-MAYES-DELAWARE-CREEK-OKFUSKEE-
OKMULGEE-WAGONER-CHEROKEE-ADAIR-MUSKOGEE-MCINTOSH-
1123 AM CST WED JAN 27 2010

...WINTER STORM WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM 6 AM THURSDAY TO NOON
CST FRIDAY...

A WINTER STORM WARNING IS IN EFFECT...

FOR THE FOLLOWING COUNTIES...
* IN OKLAHOMA...CHEROKEE...ADAIR...CREEK...OKFUSKEE...OKMULGEE...
WAGONER...TULSA...ROGERS...MAYES...DELAWARE...PAWNEE...OTTAWA...
WASHINGTON...OSAGE...CRAIG...NOWATA...MCINTOSH AND MUSKOGEE. IN
ARKANSAS...WASHINGTON...MADISON...BENTON AND CARROLL.

HAZARDOUS WEATHER...
* A MIXTURE OF SLEET AND FREEZING RAIN WILL SPREAD ACROSS
NORTHEAST OKLAHOMA AND FAR NORTHWEST ARKANSAS AFTER SUNRISE
THURSDAY. THE PRECIPITATION WILL BECOME HEAVY LATE THURSDAY
AFTERNOON THROUGH THURSDAY NIGHT. A TRANSITION TO SNOW IS
EXPECTED AFTER SUNRISE FRIDAY WITH THE RISK OF ADDITIONAL
ACCUMULATIONS ENDING BY LATE FRIDAY AFTERNOON.

* DANGEROUS ICE ACCUMULATIONS OF ONE HALF TO ONE INCH ARE LIKELY
ACROSS MUCH OF THE WARNING AREA. FROM 1 TO 5 INCHES OF SNOW AND
SLEET ACCUMULATION IS ALSO EXPECTED BY FRIDAY AFTERNOON...WITH
THE HIGHER AMOUNTS OF SLEET AND SNOW NEAR THE KANSAS AND
MISSOURI BORDERS.

IMPACTS...
* TRAVEL WILL BECOME VERY HAZARDOUS OR IMPOSSIBLE. POWER OUTAGES
ARE EXPECTED ALONG THE CORRIDOR OF HEAVIEST ICING. THE
POTENTIAL EXISTS FOR POWER OUTAGES OF ONE TO FIVE DAYS...WITH
MORE RURAL AREAS POSSIBLY WITHOUT POWER FOR OVER A WEEK.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...
* DELAY TRAVEL AND STAY HOME IF POSSIBLE UNTIL CONDITIONS IMPROVE.

* STAY TUNED TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO...COMMERCIAL RADIO OR
TELEVISION FOR THE LATEST INFORMATION CONCERNING THIS WEATHER
EVENT. ADDITIONAL WEATHER INFORMATION CAN ALSO BE FOUND AT:
WEATHER.GOV/TULSA.

Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360
Quoting tornadodude:


It was 318 mph, but I think it was Doppler based


You are correct, sir...being doppler based the margin for error takes it out of the running for the record
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Anyone....I have been recieving varying degrees regarding the impending "ICE STORM" here in NE Oklahoma. Local Mets say it is yet to be determined as the low off of CA has not established that track it will follow; Where as TWC is saying it could be 1/2 to 1 in of ice in this area. Anyone with conclusive info on this ice event?
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DR.Masters... Bridge Creek tornado was May 3rd 1999.
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Quoting CybrTeddy:
231-mph NH wind gust is no longer world's fastest

Techincally, the wind gust in Oklahoma on May 3rd, 1999 is the highest wind speed recorded (316 mph if I remember correct in the F-5 that hit there?)


It was 318 mph, but I think it was Doppler based


Jeff discusses it above from this site: http://wmo.asu.edu/tornado-highest-recorded-wind-speed-tornado-doppler-radar
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360
231-mph NH wind gust is no longer world's fastest

Techincally, the wind gust in Oklahoma on May 3rd, 1999 is the highest wind speed recorded (316 mph if I remember correct in the F-5 that hit there?)
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Quoting AwakeInMaryland:


Our degrees of separation are down to what? about 1&1/2?? So much fun! I graduated 9 years before you...but was "older" returning student...LOL...in my 20's. Hilarious to think that was "older," now.


We just need to throw Kevin Bacon in there, and we're all good...
Member Since: June 20, 2005 Posts: 22 Comments: 1054
Quoting TampaTom:


That place was awesome. My mom took me there for dinner the night before graduation...


Our degrees of separation are down to what? about 1&1/2?? So much fun! I graduated 9 years before you...but was "older" returning student...LOL...in my 20's. Hilarious to think that was "older," now.

ADD: What WAS that hole-in-the wall on Rte. 1? Make that the hole-in-the- uh, regurgitation - trough?
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Quoting Floodman:


94th Aerosquadron was a chain; we had one in St Louis that closed in the late 80s, early 90s. I'm sure that that one closed due to the neighborhood changing though. I used to love going in for a few drinks after work and the food was great


there are actually only 4 of them, well 3 now

link
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360
Quoting AwakeInMaryland:
T-Dude, I agree with TampaTom's restaurant choices. I just went to see if the 94th Aero Squadron restaurant was still open at the College Park Airport (not walking distance, but used to be a blast...you could watch and listen to the local air traffic).

So sad to see it's closed. I'm sure it was a victim of the DC Beltway NO-FLY zone, as was the airport -- therefore another sad local economic victim of 9-11.


94th Aerosquadron was a chain; we had one in St Louis that closed in the late 80s, early 90s. I'm sure that that one closed due to the neighborhood changing though. I used to love going in for a few drinks after work and the food was great
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Quoting Patrap:
Camille a Cat 5 in 1969 had a Gust recorded unofficially at the SeaBee Base in Long Beach,Miss of 212mph inside the Eyewall.

The instrument failed at 212 mph so the actual Max wasnt recorded if it was Higher.
253-mph in a tropical cyclone taxes satisfactory verbal description. That is almost an F-5 on the old Fujita scale.
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Quoting Patrap:


In the N Hemisphere,but not always,..as Some storms can and do have it occur in the Other Quads.Usually,in my obs,this occurs closer to Landfall,or that could be due to better radar nearer the coast.

Dr. Masters or someone may could elaborate on that.

A good subject maybe for a Soph or Fresh to study thru their Senior Year and expound on, though.



oh ok thanks a bunch man, may look into it for a paper, peer reviewed of course
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360
Quoting AwakeInMaryland:
T-Dude, I agree with TampaTom's restaurant choices. I just went to see if the 94th Aero Squadron restaurant was still open at the College Park Airport (not walking distance, but used to be a blast...you could watch and listen to the local air traffic).

So sad to see it's closed. I'm sure it was a victim of the DC Beltway NO-FLY zone, as was the airport -- and another sad local victim of 9-11.


That place was awesome. My mom took me there for dinner the night before graduation...
Member Since: June 20, 2005 Posts: 22 Comments: 1054
Thanks Dr. M. Curious what the temperature was at the time of this wind gust.Can't find any record of the temperature.Gives a whole new meaning to wind chill factor.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting tornadodude:


so that would normally occur on the right front quadrant?


In the N Hemisphere,but not always,..as Some storms can and do have it occur in the Other Quads.Usually,in my obs,this occurs closer to Landfall,or that could be due to better radar nearer the coast.

Dr. Masters or someone may could elaborate on that.

A good subject maybe for a Soph or Fresh to study thru their Senior Year and expound on, though.

Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 427 Comments: 129452
T-Dude, I agree with TampaTom's restaurant choices. I just went to see if the 94th Aero Squadron restaurant was still open at the College Park Airport (not walking distance, but used to be a blast...you could watch and listen to the local air traffic).

So sad to see it's closed. I'm sure it was a victim of the DC Beltway NO-FLY zone, as was the airport -- therefore another sad local economic victim of 9-11.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
thanks for the info Pat, that is really cool/interesting
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8360

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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