Hurricane season draws to a close

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:23 PM GMT on November 30, 2009

Share this Blog
2
+

It's November 30, and the inconsequential Atlantic hurricane season of 2009 is in the books. Residents all along the Atlantic coast can give thanks for this year's much-needed respite after the pummeling Mother Nature gave last year. The four direct deaths recorded this year represented the lowest death toll since the El Niño hurricane season of 1997, which also had four deaths. This year's season featured only nine named storms, three hurricanes and two major hurricanes, which was 61%, 38%, and 51% of the 1995 - 2008 average activity for named storms, hurricanes and major hurricanes, respectively, according to the end-of-season summary posted by the Colorado State University hurricane forecast team of Phil Klotzbach/Bill Gray. Higher than average wind shear, and lower than average relative humidity at middle levels of the atmosphere were primarily responsible for this year's reduced activity (Figures 1 and 2). These conditions are common during El Niño years, and this year's moderate El Niño undoubtedly contributed to the low levels of Atlantic hurricane activity observed. In addition, a stronger and more southerly than usual mid-Atlantic trough was active during much of hurricane season, contributing to high wind shear over the Atlantic.


Figure 1. Departure of relative humidity at mid-levels of the atmosphere (500 mb, about 18,000 feet) for the August - October peak portion of the 2009 hurricane season. Subsiding air due to El Niño conditions depressed the relative humidity up to 15% below average (red colors) over the tropical Atlantic. Image credit: end-of-season summary posted by the Colorado State University hurricane forecast team of Phil Klotzbach/Bill Gray, with data from NOAA/ESRL.


Figure 2. Departure of wind shear from average for the peak 60-day period of the Atlantic hurricane season. The August-October averaged 200-850 mb vertical wind shear across the Main Development Region (MDR, 10-20°N, 20-70°W) was 9.3 m/s, which was the highest vertical shear magnitude over this three-month period since the El Niño year of 2002. The 2009 August-October MDR value was also approximately 2 m/s greater than the 1995-2008 average vertical shear. Image credit: NOAA/CPC.


Some other notable feature taken from the Klotzbach/Gray report:

A late-starting season. Ana did not form until August 15. This was the latest "A" storm of the season since Andrew formed in 1992 on August 17. However, the 2009 season exploded into a flurry of action August 15 - 16, when the Atlantic featured a rare triple threat of simultaneous named storms beginning with the letters A, B, and C--Ana, Bill, and Claudette. The last time this occurred was in the slow-starting 1984 hurricane season, when Tropical Storms Arthur, Bertha, and Cesar were all active on September 1.

Nine named storms occurred during 2009. This is the fewest since 1997, when eight named storms formed.

27.25 named storm days occurred in 2009. This is the fewest named storm days since 1991, when only 24.25 named storm days were recorded.

Three hurricanes occurred in 2009. This is the fewest since 1997 when there were also three hurricanes.

Five named storms (Ana, Danny, Erika, Fred, and Henri) dissipated over the open ocean in the tropical and sub-tropical Atlantic this year. This is a fairly rare occurrence that typically only occurs in years such as this year that are characterized by high levels of tropospheric vertical wind shear.

11.25 hurricane days occurred in 2009. This is the fewest hurricane days since 2002 when 10.75 hurricane days were reported.

2 major hurricanes formed during the 2009 hurricane season. The last time that fewer than two major hurricanes occurred in a season was in 1997 when only one major hurricane (Erika) formed.

3.25 major hurricane days occurred in 2009. This is the fewest major hurricane days in a season since 2006 when only two major hurricane days were recorded.

The season accrued an Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) of 50. The 1951 - 2005 average is 102.3, and the 2009 ACE was the lowest since 1997 (41) and the 16th lowest of the last 66 years since the aircraft reconnaissance era began in 1944.

No Category 5 hurricanes developed in 2009. This is the second consecutive year with no Category 5 hurricanes. The last time that two or more years occurred in a row with no Category 5 hurricanes was 1999-2002.

No named storms formed in June or July. The last time that no storm activity occurred in June or July was 2004 (Alex formed that year on August 1). This is the 18th year of the past 66 years with no storm formations in June or July.

August had above-average ACE activity. 29 ACE units were recorded during the month, which is approximately 125% of the 1950-2000 average.

58% of seasonal ACE was generated during the month of August. The last time that more than 58% of seasonal ACE was generated during the month of August was in 1942.

September was very quiet with only 11 ACE units generated during the month. This is the quietest September since 1994 when only 3 ACE units were recorded.

No ACE was generated between September 13 and October 4. The last time that this occurred was 1991. Prior to that, one has to go all the way back to 1925 to see no ACE generated during three of the most active weeks of the Atlantic hurricane season.

October was also very quiet with only 2 ACE units occurring. This is the quietest October since 1994 when no tropical cyclone activity occurred.

Only 13 ACE units occurred during the combined September-October period. This is the fewest ACE units during this two-month period since 1994 (3), and the fifth fewest since the aircraft reconnaissance era began in 1944.

Hurricane Bill generated 26 ACE units, or 52% of the seasonal total. The last time that one storm generated that much of the seasonal total was Erika in 1997 which generated 63% of the total ACE observed that year.

Hurricane Fred became the third storm on record to reach major hurricane status east of 35°W, although prior to 1972 when Dvorak satellite estimates from polar-orbiting satellite reconnaissance became routinely available, some storms may have been missed in the eastern part of the Atlantic basin.

Hurricane Ida became only the second hurricane to reach hurricane status in the Caribbean in November during an El Niño year (where El Niño is defined to be all years since 1950 where the October Niño 3.4 SST anomaly is 0.5ñC or greater). The only other storm to reach hurricane status in the Caribbean in November in an El Niño year was Martha in 1969.

Ida became the second latest tropical cyclone to make landfall along the Gulf Coast, trailing only Hurricane Kate in 1985 (which made landfall on November 21).

Only two tropical storms (Claudette and Ida) made U.S. landfall this year while no hurricanes made U.S. landfall. This is the first time since 2006 and the 13th time in the last 66 years where no hurricanes made U.S. landfall.

No hurricanes made landfall along the Florida Peninsula and East Coast. This marks the fourth year in a row with no hurricane landfalls along this portion of the U.S. coastline. The last time that we went four years between hurricane landfalls along the Florida Peninsula and East Coast was 1980-1983.

No major hurricanes made U.S. landfall this year. Following seven major hurricane landfalls in 2004-2005, the U.S. has not witnessed a major hurricane landfall in the past four years. The four consecutive years between 2000-2003 also experienced no major U.S. hurricane landfalls. Since 1995, the Atlantic basin has had 56 major hurricanes but only 10 (18%) have made U.S. landfall. The long-period average is that approximately 30% of major hurricanes that form in the Atlantic basin make U.S. landfall.


Figure 3. The eye of Hurricane Bill on August 19 at 2157 UTC, from a NOAA P-3 Hurricane Hunter aircraft flying at 10,000 feet. Photo credit: Jack Parrish of NOAA's Aircraft Operations Center.

Hurricane Bill
Hurricane Bill was the strongest hurricane of the 2009 Atlantic hurricane season. Bill peaked in intensity as a lower-end Category 4 storm with 135 mph winds. Bill was a very large storm, and had the fifth largest diameter of tropical storm force winds on record (460 miles). Bill brought tropical storm force winds of 46 mph to the Bermuda airport as the storm passed about 175 mi west of the island at Category 2 strength, during the morning of 22 August. The hurricane then recurved and turned to the northeast with increasing forward speed, brushed the south coast of Nova Scotia early on 23 August, and made landfall as a tropical storm near the Burin Peninsula of Newfoundland.

Top winds on Newfoundland were measured at Cape Race, which recorded sustained winds of 58 mph, gusting to 76 mph, between 1:30 and 2:30 am NDT on 24 August. A storm surge of 1.2 meters (4 feet) was estimated by Environment Canada for Placentia Bay where Bill made landfall. Damage was minor on Newfoundland, with no major flooding reported. Bill dumped up to three inches of rain on Newfoundland.

There were two deaths associated with Bill. A 7-year-old girl died in Acadia National Park, Maine when she was swept into the water by large waves, and a 54-year-old swimmer drowned in New Smyrna Beach, Florida in rough seas caused by Bill. The large hurricane fueled high waves over a large portion of the Atlantic basin for several days. The Meteorological Service of the Dominican Republic reported that these waves produced coastal flooding and damage along the north coast of the Dominican Republic. Reports from Environment Canada indicate that in Nova Scotia power outages were common (tens of thousands of residences lost power) and there were road wash-outs and localized fresh water flooding. Coastal flooding from surge and waves was widespread along much of the Atlantic coast. On Long Island, NY, beach damage was severe; in some areas the damage was the worst since Hurricane Gloria in 1985. Along the coasts of North Carolina, waves averaging 10 ft (3.0 m) in height impacted beaches. In Wrightsville Beach, up to 30 rescues were made due to strong rip currents and large swells; however, only one incident resulted in hospitalization. Severe beach erosion took place at Bald Head Island, where 150 ft (46 m) of beach was washed away, resulting in the loss of the remaining sea turtle nests.


Figure 4. Radar reflectivity image of Tropical Storm Claudette as it approached landfall just southeast of Fort Walton Beach shortly after midnight on 8/17/09.

Tropical Storm Claudette
Tropical Storm Claudette made landfall at about 1:15 am EDT August 17, 2009, near the eastern end of Santa Rosa Island, just southeast of Fort Walton Beach in Florida. Claudette's top winds were around 50 mph. A Personal Weather Station in Eastpoint, FL recorded sustained winds of 49 mph, gusting to 66 mph as Claudette approached the coast. Heavy rains of 3 - 4 inches were confined to a narrow strip of coast, and Claudette did not cause any major flooding. Apalachicola received just over 4 inches of rain so far from Claudette. One death is being blamed on Claudette, a drowning off the Florida Panhandle coast.


Figure 5.. Hurricane Fred at peak strength, 8:55am EDT UTC 9/9/09. At the time, Fred was a Category 3 hurricane with 120 mph winds. Image credit: NASA.

Hurricane Fred
Fred became only the fourth major hurricane on record in the far southeastern portion of the Atlantic basin (south of 30°N and east of 40°W) and is the only hurricane on record in the basin with an intensity greater than 100 kt when located south of 30°N and east of 35°W. However, it is important to note that prior to 1972 (when routine Dvorak classifications from polar-orbiting satellites began), it would have been difficult to assess the intensity of most tropical cyclones in this part of the Atlantic basin.


Figure 6. Tropical Storm Ida at 1 pm EST November 5, 2009. In this MODIS image captured seven hours after landfall, Ida was a tropical storm with 65 mph winds. Image credit: NASA.

Hurricane Ida
Hurricane Ida made landfall over eastern Nicaragua on November 4 as a Category 1 hurricane with 75 mph winds--the first November Atlantic hurricane to make landfall in an El Niño year since 1925. Ida intensified at one of the fastest rates on record as it approached Nicaragua. It took just 24 hours from when the first advisory was issued for Tropical Depression Eleven until Ida reached hurricane strength. Since reliable satellite measurements began in 1970, Hurricane Humberto holds the record for fastest intensification from first advisory issued to hurricane strength--18 hours. (Actually, Humberto did the feat in 14 1/4 hours, but this was rounded off to 18 hours in the final data base, which stores points every six hours). Ida is now tied for second place for fastest intensification from first advisory to hurricane strength. There have been six other storms that accomplished the feat in 24 hours.

Ida survived its crossing of Nicaragua, and intensified once it emerged over the Caribbean, eventually reaching Category 2 strength over the Gulf of Mexico as it headed northwards towards the U.S. Gulf Coast. High wind shear and cool water temperatures caused Ida to weaken dramatically before landfall in Alabama, and Ida made landfall near Dauphin Island, Alabama at 5:40 am CST November 10, as a tropical storm with 45 mph winds. Winds at coastal locations during Ida's landfall were mostly below tropical storm force. One exception was Dauphin Island, where winds peaked at 40 mph, gusting to 50 mph, near midnight. Radar-estimated rainfall from Ida showed many regions received 3 - 5 inches of rain, which caused some minor river and street flooding. The main damage from Ida seems to have been beach erosion, as a 3 - 6 foot storm surge topped by battering waves affected a long stretch of coast, from Southeast Louisiana to the Florida Panhandle. Ida drove a 5.5 foot storm surge to Shell Beach, LA (on the east side of New Orleans). Ida was responsible for one death, a 70-year-old fisherman who knocked off of his boat in the Mississippi River by a wave as Ida approached.

The remnants of Ida merged with a Nor'easter that developed off the coast of North Carolina, and the Ida-energized Nor'easter brought the highest storm surges on record to the Atlantic coast between Norfolk, Virginia, and Lewes, Delaware.

Next year's hurricane season?
The Colorado State hurricane forecast team will be issuing their forecast for the 2010 Atlantic hurricane season on Wednesday, December 9. Expect them to forecast a more active season. Since 1950, there have been 17 El Niño events, and only one of them lasted through two full hurricane seasons. Thus, we can expect neutral or La Niña conditions for next year's hurricane season, which should lead to much higher levels of activity than in 2009.

Correction
In my previous post, on the Manufactured Doubt industry and the hacked CRU emails, I mistakenly referred to the George C. Marshall Institute as the George C. Marshall Foundation. I have corrected the error, and apologize for the confusion. The George C. Marshall Institute is an organization active in the Manufactured Doubt campaign against human-caused global warming, while the George C. Marshall Foundation is a charitable organization celebrating the legacy of the great American general and Secretary of State, George C. Marshall.

Major storm brewing for the Gulf Coast
There's a major extratropical storm brewing over the northern Gulf of Mexico that could be as damaging as Tropical Storm Ida was, for the Gulf Coast from New Orleans to the Florida Panhandle. The storm is expected to hit Tuesday through Wednesday. A storm tide of 4 - 6 feet is forecast for the Florida Panhandle, 3 - 5 feet for the Alabama coast, and 3 - 4 feet for the New Orleans area. Consult the NOAA extratropical storm surge forecast page for forecasts of the storm surge from this event. I'll have a new post Tuesday and/or Wednesday to discuss this storm.

Jeff Masters

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

Sign In or Register Sign In or Register

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 738 - 688

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28Blog Index

Member Since: September 14, 2007 Posts: 3 Comments: 3963
I know that the main emphasis is on the GOM system which will affect the Gulf Coast/Florida region today & tomorrow.

However, NWS San Francisco is looking at the possiblility of another "October 12-13TH like" storm system, yes, maybe TWO of them next week. Here is a portion of the Forecast Discussion:

AREA FORECAST DISCUSSION
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA CA
955 AM PST TUE DEC 1 2009

THE MAIN FOCUS FOR THE REST OF THE FORECAST WILL BE ON THE LONG
TERM. STILL WAITING FOR THE REST OF THE MEDIUM RANGE MODEL
GUIDANCE TO COME IN...BUT EVERY SOLUTION THUS FAR POINTS TO A MAJOR
PATTERN CHANGE COMMENCING NEXT WEEK.

PREVIOUS LONG TERM DISCUSSION (WALBRUN)....

EXTENDED FORECAST...THE CANADIAN (GEM) AND ECMWF MODELS ARE IN
REASONABLY GOOD AGREEMENT WITH THE LONG RANGE FORECAST AND WE`VE
FOLLOWED THEIR WETTER SOLUTIONS. THE GFS MODEL CONTINUES TO STRUGGLE
WITH AN ARCTIC INTRUSION THAT IT DROPS DOWN FROM PACIFIC NORTHWEST
INTO THE NORTHERN GREAT BASIN. MORE REASONABLE SOLUTION THERE WILL
KEEP THAT ASSOCIATED TROUGH AND COLD AIR FARTHER EAST OVER MONTANA.

FOLLOWING THE GEM AND ECMWF WOULD BRING RAIN CHANCES TO NORTHERN
CALIFORNIA BY SUNDAY...ESPECIALLY LATER IN THE DAY AND HAVE KEPT
POPS IN THE CHANCE CATEGORY. MODEL SOLUTIONS ACTUALLY BRING WARM
ADVECTION RAINS ONSHORE SOMETIME SUNDAY EVENING BUT ENOUGH
UNCERTAINTY TO AT LEAST MENTION RAIN CHANCES DURING THE DAY SUNDAY.
RAIN CHANCES THEN INCREASE OVERNIGHT SUNDAY INTO MONDAY. THE EURO
HASN`T REALLY WAVERED OVER THE LAST THREE MODEL RUNS WITH TWO
RELATIVELY WEAKER STORMS SUNDAY NIGHT THROUGH TUESDAY WITH THE
REMNANTS OF FORMER SUPER-TYPHOON NIDA ARRIVING ON WEDNESDAY. AGAIN
THE GEM MODEL IS VERY SIMILAR TO THE EURO IN TIMING AND INTENSITY
WITH AT LEAST TWO ~980-985 MB LOWS PASSING WEST OF CAPE MENDOCINO
MONDAY THROUGH WEDS OF NEXT WEEK.
THE ONLY THING KEEPING CONFIDENCE
DOWN SLIGHTLY IS THE FACT THAT THE GFS MODEL KEEPS THINGS DRY UNTIL
WEDS. CONSENSUS IN HOUSE AND WITH NEIGHBORING OFFICES IS TO DISREGARD
THIS AND WOULD EXPECT TO SEE NEW RUNS OF THE GFS TREND MORE IN LINE
WITH THE EURO. ITS GETTING HARD NOT TO START DRAWING ANALOGIES TO THE
OCTOBER EVENT WITH ANOTHER RE-CURVING FORMER TYPHOON TAKING AIM AT
THE CENTRAL COAST AND NORTHERN CALIFORNIA. TO GIVE AN IDEA ON
RAINFALL POTENTIAL...AND THESE ARE VERY COARSE AND PRELIMINARY AT
THIS TIME THE ECMWF GIVES 4 DAY STORM TOTALS OF 5-7 INCHES IN THE
HILLS WITH WIDESPREAD 3 TO 5 INCH RAIN TOTALS FOR THE VALLEYS. OVER
IN THE SIERRA THE LATEST RUNS GIVE STORM TOTAL QPF OF NEARLY 19
INCHES OF LIQUID PRECIP. STILL WAY TOO EARLY TO GET SPECIFIC BUT
OBVIOUSLY THE SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS AND BIG SUR COAST COULD REALLY GET
NAILED AGAIN. AS WITH THE OCTOBER STORM WILL EVENTUALLY HAVE TO LOOK
INTO WIND AND BIG SWELL POTENTIAL AS WELL. ITS NOT TOO EARLY TO START
YOUR STORM PREPARATIONS.


Member Since: Posts: Comments:
So if the severe weather will likely shift east then.. so from tallahassee to west will get heavy and cold damp rain or the temperatures wont take part after the low passes through?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
damn you press....no more mentioning "the twins"!!!!!!!!!

Member Since: January 24, 2007 Posts: 319 Comments: 31956
Quoting hurricanejunky:


Hallelujah!


I second that! LOL
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8416
Quoting NRAamy:
junky....no one is babysitting the twins, I guess I'm the meat in the group hug sandwich, and even I have seen enough of Al's mug for one day....


Hallelujah!
Member Since: August 28, 2006 Posts: 6 Comments: 2902
Quoting Jeff9641:
According to the NWS in Melbourne this squall line appears to be moving faster than anticipated and the low is further south in the gulf than forecast. As a result a moderate risk of severe weather will be added for north and central Florida. This squall will make it to the west coast of Florida at about 2 to 4pm during max heating and becuase of this the raise in the severe weather threat across central and north Florida. Large long track tornados will occur in an isolated fashion but the ones that due form will be deadly. The main threat will be damaging winds possibly reaching 70 to 80 mph. Get ready if you live in Florida because tomorrow appears to be a dangerous day for us.


Is that going to increase the severe weather threat for SW FL as well?
Member Since: August 28, 2006 Posts: 6 Comments: 2902
Quoting AwakeInMaryland:
HurricaneJunky --
Tell her you'll babysit the twins for a weekend, that should get you lots of points.

(And bring Al's new book for kids...shhh, that's our secret :) )


LOL! If I'm gonna babysit anyone's twins I'd need to meet them first.
Member Since: August 28, 2006 Posts: 6 Comments: 2902
junky....no one is babysitting the twins, I guess I'm the meat in the group hug sandwich, and even I have seen enough of Al's mug for one day....
Member Since: January 24, 2007 Posts: 319 Comments: 31956
Hey everybody, just checking in to the blog to see what is going to happen with the storm system tomorrow. They make it sound like things could be rough here in Tampa. What do you all think?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting NRAamy:
how much is it worth to you, junky?


What are we talking about here? Me babysitting the twins, you being in the middle or you not posting another Al Gore photo? I'm confused!
Member Since: August 28, 2006 Posts: 6 Comments: 2902
thanks 718 & 720, apparently my question was answered as i asked it.
Member Since: July 31, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 1322
I know we have not had a solid line of precip make it thru SWFL in recent memory. Alot of times the radar on nexrad will show it coming down but the reality is that it never really hits the surface. We have had "some" rain...but not a good squall line with lightning off the gulf in what seems to be forever. Just the opposite it seems for LA and the panhandle......
Member Since: July 30, 2005 Posts: 1 Comments: 969
Quoting NRAamy:



Now do you guys see my problem? This is where I live...I got nuthin'....no weather for donkeys years.....

So you see why I am compelled to act like a 3rd grade boy on here?


question answered.. same here, the 'minne' ending in 'sota'

so, is that tornadic threat for Fl. still coming as discussed late last week? I was never clear on the anticipated setup of this system, so I can't really gauge if this is playing out as forecast. any comments?
Member Since: July 31, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 1322
Quoting NRAamy:
Awake...you're not helping....

;)

LOL.
Bored with our suddenly good weather.
We'll pay for this...
Member Since: August 19, 2008 Posts: 32 Comments: 1918
Gulf Link:
IRLoop
Member Since: July 11, 2006 Posts: 14 Comments: 11501


From the 12:01 pm CDT NOLA NWS discussion..


Surface analysis shows are of low pressure has developed in the western Gulf has is beginning to deepen.
As the surface ridge to the NE of the area shifts eastward and upper low over northern Mexico moves eastward...this Gulf low will track northeastward towards the la coast.
The rain shield will progressively spread northward today with the bulk of the sh/ts activity along the southeastern half of the County Warning Area.

The two main concerns are heavy rainfall and strong to severe thunderstorms.

Flash Flood Watch has been expanded slightly
northward to account for a slightly more northerly track of the surface low.
2 to 4 inches of rain will be possible in this area today. As the Gulf low moves towards the coast...an associated warm front will also be lifting northward in the evening and overnight hours.

Instability parameters are not expected to be very impressive but sufficient.
Strong and deep layer shear is expected to be in place which will enhance the potential for supercells to form.


The main threats will be tornadoes/waterspouts and damaging winds.


Expect this threat to be along and southeast of a btr to mcb line with the greatest threat from hou to new to asd to pql and southward into the
coastal waters.


Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 437 Comments: 134770
Awake...you're not helping....

;)
Member Since: January 24, 2007 Posts: 319 Comments: 31956
HurricaneJunky --
Tell her you'll babysit the twins for a weekend, that should get you lots of points.

(And bring Al's new book for kids...shhh, that's our secret :) )
Member Since: August 19, 2008 Posts: 32 Comments: 1918
so when do u all think when line of storms will come thru panhandle of FL?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:



Now do you guys see my problem? This is where I live...I got nuthin'....no weather for donkeys years.....

So you see why I am compelled to act like a 3rd grade boy on here?
Member Since: January 24, 2007 Posts: 319 Comments: 31956
how much is it worth to you, junky?
Member Since: January 24, 2007 Posts: 319 Comments: 31956
Quoting NRAamy:
708. pearlandaggie 11:23 AM PST on December 01, 2009
oh, man has the discussion degraded. bring back the CAGW talk! LOL



no problem...let me just find another photo of Al's ginormous head first....


No! You're regressing...resist the urge at all costs Amy, I beg of you.
Member Since: August 28, 2006 Posts: 6 Comments: 2902
712. xcool






Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Extended Forecast Discussion


THE REAL FLY IN THE OINTMENT IS HOW
DEVELOPED THE WAVE OVER THE WESTERN ATLANTIC BECOMES
SATURDAY...WITH THE POTENTIAL FOR THE SEASONS FIRST WIDESPREAD
SNOWFALL OVER THE LOWER ELEVATIONS OF THE MID ATLANTIC AND
NORTHEAST AT LEAST AN OUTSIDE CHANCE.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
708. pearlandaggie 11:23 AM PST on December 01, 2009
oh, man has the discussion degraded. bring back the CAGW talk! LOL



no problem...let me just find another photo of Al's ginormous head first....
Member Since: January 24, 2007 Posts: 319 Comments: 31956
oh, man has the discussion degraded. bring back the CAGW talk! LOL
Member Since: September 14, 2007 Posts: 3 Comments: 3963
707. xcool
WEATHER DETAILS FOR SLIDELL, LA


Friday Night
Breezy and cold with periods of rain mixing with snowLow Temperature:33FRealFeel:20FWinds:N at 17mphWind Gusts:25 mphMaximum UV:(4)Thunderstorm Probability:5%Amount of Precipitation:0.40inAmount of Rain:0.40inAmount of Snow:0in Hours of Precipitation:7 hrsHours of Rain:6 hrs


http://www.accuweather.com/us/la/slidell/70458/forecast.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=1&metric=0
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Or maybe hippo sweat is a natural hallucinogen?

damn! my secret is out....
Member Since: January 24, 2007 Posts: 319 Comments: 31956
Quoting holynova:
Songwriters: Hunter, Robert C;Garcia, Jerome J Aint nobody messing with you, but you, your friends are getting most concerned.Loose with the truth, baby, its your fire, but baby dont get burned. When the smoke has cleared, she said thats what she said to me. Gonna want a bed to lay your head and a little sympathy.
oh, did i mean first verse... honest to the point of....
Member Since: July 31, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 1322
Quoting Minnemike:


i am literally listening to althea/lost sailor/saint of circumstance... i supply my own ;-)


LOL! Or maybe hippo sweat is a natural hallucinogen?
Member Since: August 28, 2006 Posts: 6 Comments: 2902
Quoting Minnemike:
Floodman, maybe you can help here... what's the end of the 2nd verse to Althea?

yup, blogging.
Songwriters: Hunter, Robert C;Garcia, Jerome J Aint nobody messing with you, but you, your friends are getting most concerned.Loose with the truth, baby, its your fire, but baby dont get burned. When the smoke has cleared, she said thats what she said to me. Gonna want a bed to lay your head and a little sympathy.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
701. hurricanejunky
7:16 PM GMT on December 01, 2009
Quoting AwakeInMaryland:

I am SO relieved. Thanks for being so understanding!


No problem.
Member Since: August 28, 2006 Posts: 6 Comments: 2902
700. Minnemike
7:16 PM GMT on December 01, 2009
Quoting hurricanejunky:


Did Amy slip you a virtual tab of orange sunshine?


i am literally listening to althea/lost sailor/saint of circumstance... i supply my own ;-)
Member Since: July 31, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 1322
699. StormChaser81
7:14 PM GMT on December 01, 2009
Member Since: August 11, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2315
698. NRAamy
7:13 PM GMT on December 01, 2009
the History Channel ran a program this AM about the volcano on Krakatoa that exploded in the 1800's.....couldn't that have added to Global Warming? I mean, it sent a load of crap up into the air....and that surely was not manmade.....
Member Since: January 24, 2007 Posts: 319 Comments: 31956
697. AwakeInMaryland
7:13 PM GMT on December 01, 2009
Quoting hurricanejunky:


No problem. I misunderstood. Happy blogging!

I am SO relieved. Thanks for being so understanding!
Member Since: August 19, 2008 Posts: 32 Comments: 1918
696. hurricanejunky
7:13 PM GMT on December 01, 2009
Quoting Minnemike:
is al gore a lost sailor, or saint of circumstance... ok ok, i'm done ;-P


Did Amy slip you a virtual tab of orange sunshine?
Member Since: August 28, 2006 Posts: 6 Comments: 2902
695. Chicklit
7:11 PM GMT on December 01, 2009

Looks like the Gulf front is starting to fire up.
Member Since: July 11, 2006 Posts: 14 Comments: 11501
694. Minnemike
7:09 PM GMT on December 01, 2009
is al gore a lost sailor, or saint of circumstance... ok ok, i'm done ;-P
Member Since: July 31, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 1322
693. Patrap
7:06 PM GMT on December 01, 2009
Note the Cyclogensis Occurring on the Radar view offshore.


NEXRAD Radar
Houston-Galveston, Base Reflectivity 0.50 Degree Elevation Range 124 NMI


Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 437 Comments: 134770
692. nishinigami
7:06 PM GMT on December 01, 2009
Quoting Patrap:
Stay safe down there..the brunt will come tonight into early morning..
thanks pat, I appreciate that. We will. I will be watching the weather like a hawk tonight :)
Member Since: August 24, 2008 Posts: 2 Comments: 221
691. hurricanejunky
7:05 PM GMT on December 01, 2009
Quoting NRAamy:
you know... it's the ugly mug that is visually irritating. if it has to come down to that, can you please refrain on aesthetics alone? or a smaller pic, the dude's head is huge!

:-)


Minne...did you ever know that you're my hero?

:)

Junky, not only do you get a virtual hug, but you get a virtual Group Hug....and NRAamy, Minne, Junky sandwich! Who wants to be the meat in the middle?


Wouldn't that be you? Oh wait, it's getting hot in here! DOH!
Member Since: August 28, 2006 Posts: 6 Comments: 2902
690. NRAamy
7:04 PM GMT on December 01, 2009
Jerry's gone, Minne...drivin' that train....
Member Since: January 24, 2007 Posts: 319 Comments: 31956
689. hurricanejunky
7:04 PM GMT on December 01, 2009
Quoting HurrMichaelOrl:
663, The storms from the gulf seem to do that here too. A squall line, or a large area of rain will approach Tampa, and often manage to make it ashore, just to completely dissipate before it gets to the Orlando area. Does anybody remember the last time we had a completeley filled out squall-line move across and completely clear C. Florida?


I remember that terrible tornado outbreak a few years back in C. Florida! That was crazy!
Member Since: August 28, 2006 Posts: 6 Comments: 2902
688. Minnemike
7:03 PM GMT on December 01, 2009
Floodman, maybe you can help here... what's the end of the 2nd verse to Althea?

yup, blogging.
Member Since: July 31, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 1322

Viewing: 738 - 688

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Dr. Masters co-founded wunderground in 1995. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990. Co-blogging with him: Bob Henson, @bhensonweather

Local Weather

Mostly Cloudy
81 °F
Mostly Cloudy

JeffMasters's Recent Photos

Gust front cloud, SE Michigan
Thunderstorm over Grand Teton
Double rainbow over Old Faithful
Rainbow in Riverside Geyser