A new record minimum for arctic sea ice

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:07 PM GMT on November 18, 2009

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Arctic sea ice reached a new record minimum during the first half of November, according to data from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (Figure 1). The record low ice extent this month is the first extended period of record minimum arctic sea ice since 2007. The new record minimum suggests that the gains in ice seen over the past two years were probably a temporary fluctuation due to normal year-to-year variability in the weather, and that the long-term arctic sea ice decline observed since the 1970s is continuing.


Figure 1. Arctic sea ice extent up to November 16, 2009, compared to the record low year of 2007 and the average from 1979 - 2000. Sea ice extent over the past ten days has fallen below the record minimum observed in 2007. Image credit: National Snow and Ice Data Center.

What caused the new record low?
The record low was due to very warm air invading the Arctic during October, in combination with the unusually warm ocean temperatures that have prevailed in the region over the past few decades. The warm air temperatures were primarily the result of an intense series of low pressure systems in the Arctic Ocean, north of Siberia, that worked in concert with a very strong high pressure system north of Alaska to drive warm air from Central Asia poleward over the past six weeks. The strong storms and unusual pressure pattern brought winds of about 5 mph above average to large regions of the Arctic Ocean, which helped break up existing ice and kept ice from freezing as much as usual. With all that warm air flowing into the Arctic, the cold air that was there had to go somewhere else, and that "somewhere else" was North America. The U.S. recorded its 3rd coldest October on record in 2009, thanks to cold air flowing out of the Arctic. The temperature and sea level pressure patterns over the Northern Hemisphere for October (Figure 2) were highly anomalous, with temperatures up to 27°F (15°C) above average over the Arctic Ocean, and sea level pressures up to 11 mb above average. The atmospheric circulation pattern has shifted over the past two weeks, with the result that warm air from Central Asia is no longer being pumped into the Arctic so vigorously, nor is cold air from the Arctic streaming southward into North America. As a result, temperature anomalies in the Arctic are beginning to decline, and sea ice extent later this month will probably rise above the record minimums observed in 2007.



Figure 2. Departure of surface air temperature and surface pressure from average for October 2009. Surface temperatures in the Arctic were up to 27°F (15°C) above average over the Arctic Ocean, due to sea ice loss. The strongest anomalies occurred where sea ice was missing from its usual position, though the entire Arctic was affected. The clockwise flow of air around the anomalously strong high pressure system north of Alaska (labeled "H" in the right-hand image) helped drive a flow of very warm air from Central Asia into the Arctic, and a very cold flow of air out of the Arctic southward into North America. Image credit: NOAA/ESRL.

How will the November sea ice loss affect next summer's sea ice loss?
A record 19% of the Arctic sea ice cover this summer in the Arctic was over 2 years old, far below the 1981 - 2000 average of 52%. In the summer of 2009, NASA researcher Ron Kwok and colleagues from the University of Washington in Seattle published satellite data showing that mean winter arctic ice thickness declined by 48% between 1980 and 2008. The loss accelerated over the past five years, with the ice losing 0.68 meters (2.2 feet) of thickness between 2004 and 2008, finishing at 6.2 feet thick. This remarkable thinning was confirmed in May 2009 by the Catlin Arctic Survey, a 9-week, 435 km expedition across the Canadian Arctic led by polar scientist Professor Peter Wadhams of the University of Cambridge. Wadhams' expedition found that most of the route had first year ice just 5.9 feet (1.8 meters) thick. With El Niño conditions crossing from the moderate to strong category over the past two weeks in the Eastern Pacific, the prospects for a much warmer than usual winter in the Arctic have increased, likely setting the stage for continued record or near-record minimum sea ice extent and thickness into next spring. The arctic sea ice will be very vulnerable to a new record minimum next summer if warmer than average temperatures are seen over the Arctic.

Sea ice loss causes stronger storms in the Arctic
The stronger storms over the Arctic Ocean this fall were due, in part, to the loss of sea ice. In a 2009 article titled, Extraordinary September Arctic sea ice reductions and their relationships with storm behavior over 1979-2008, Simmonds and Keay found that September storms over the East Arctic intensified by about 1 mb over the past 30 years and had grown about 50 miles larger in diameter, thanks to all the extra heat energy supplied by more open water due to recent losses in Arctic sea ice. These stronger storms may create a positive feedback loop that will lead to even more sea ice loss: reduced sea ice drives stronger storms, whose winds break up sea ice, creating even more warm water to feed stronger storms with stronger winds, and so on. Now that the arctic sea ice is 48% thinner than 30 years ago, this effect will increase in importance, since thinner ice breaks up more readily in strong winds.

Expect an ice-free Arctic by 2030
In a press release put out by the Catlin Arctic Survey, Professor Wadhams said, "The Catlin Arctic Survey data supports the new consensus view--based on seasonal variation of ice extent and thickness, changes in temperatures, winds and especially ice composition--that the Arctic will be ice-free in summer within about 20 years, and that much of the decrease will be happening within 10 years". In their 2009 report on this year's Arctic sea ice minimum, National Snow and Ice Data Center Director and Senior Scientist Dr. Mark Serreze said, "It's nice to see a little recovery over the past couple years, but there's no reason to think that we're headed back to conditions seen back in the 1970s. We still expect to see ice-free summers sometime in the next few decades". At the December 2008 American Geophysical Union (AGU) meeting, the world's largest climate change conference, sea ice expert Dr. Wieslaw Maslowski of the Navy Postgraduate School blamed 60% of the melting during the past decade on heat brought in by ocean currents, and projected that summertime arctic sea ice would completely disappear by 2016. Dr. Jim Overland of NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory was more conservative, projecting a 2030 demise of arctic sea ice. He thought we would be "hanging around where we are for a while", and thought it would take two more unusual summers like the "perfect storm" of 2007 to push the system to an ice-free state.

The consequences
There were 88 presentations on arctic sea ice at the 2008 AGU conference. None of the presenters expressed the view that the current long-term decline in arctic sea ice was almost entirely natural, or that we can expect the decline to reverse this century. Sea ice experts do blame part of the decline on natural variability in the weather, but we wouldn't be where we are now without the warming caused by human-emitted greenhouse gases. One view (Stroeve et al., 2007) is that human-emitted greenhouse gases are responsible for 47 - 57% of the arctic sea ice loss since 1979. Heat-absorbing black soot from fires and pollution settling on the white ice is thought to also be a significant contributor.

The consensus I heard at the AGU conference among arctic sea ice experts was that the summertime sea ice will be gone by 2030. If they are correct, we can expect a period of significantly accelerated global climate change to begin 10 - 20 years from now. Arctic sea ice is one of the critical components maintaining the stability of our current climate. Once the the ice is gone, the climate will become unstable, with highly unpredictable results. It is true that Earth's past has many examples of warmer climates that evolved due to natural causes where life flourished, and we shouldn't fear the new, stable climate we will eventually arrive at centuries from now. However, life on Earth is adapted to the current climate. The changes that will occur during the transition will be extremely disruptive to Earth's ecosystems and the humans that rely on them for life. If one were to rate the destructive capability of climate change the way we rate hurricanes, I would rate current climate change at the "Invest" or "tropical disturbance" stage--the climate change storm is just beginning to organize. But the coming climate change storm is destined to hit our children with the full fury of intensifying hurricane.

References
Kwok, R., and D. A. Rothrock. 2009, "Decline in Arctic sea ice thickness from submarine and ICESat records: 1958-2008", Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L15501, doi:10.1029/2009GL039035

Simmonds, I., and K. Keay (2009), Extraordinary September Arctic sea ice reductions and their relationships with storm behavior over 1979.2008, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L19715, doi:10.1029/2009GL039810.

Stroeve, J., M.M. Holland, W. Meier, T. Scambos, and M. Serreze, Arctic sea ice decline:Faster than forecast", GRL 34 L09501, doi:1029/2007GL029703, 2007.

The road to Copenhagen
By some accounts, the future of the world will be at stake this December, when the crucial U.N. Climate Change Conference will be held December 7 - 18 in Copenhagen, Denmark. At that meeting, the leaders of the world will gather to negotiate an agreement to replace the 1997 Kyoto Protocol. The new agreement will be the world's road map for dealing with climate change, and the stakes are huge. Dr. Ricky Rood, author of Wunderground's climate change blog, will be there, and Wunderground has given the University of Michigan a grant to send a student who will also blog for us. I have a number of posts I'm planning in the run-up to Copenhagen, including:

- Impact of arctic sea ice loss on Northern Hemisphere winter weather
- The Manufactured Doubt industry
- What global warming skeptics say about arctic sea ice
- Is higher CO2 more beneficial for Earth's ecosystems?

I'll also have an end-of-hurricane season summary on November 30, plus posts on whatever breaking weather stories occur. My next post will be Friday, when I plan to summarize the global weather last month, which was the 2nd - 6th warmest October on record.

Jeff Masters

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IA=Individual Assistance
PA=Public Assistance
Good Lord, the NW WINDS!

National Situation Update: Friday, November 20, 2009
Homeland Security Threat Level: YELLOW (ELEVATED).
Significant National Weather

West
A strong cold front will move into the coastal areas of the Pacific Northwest today. The Oregon headlands will see wind gusts up to 80 mph while the ridge tops of the Sierras will see gusts up to 125 mph. Rain is expected from Washington to the northern San Joaquin Valley of Central California. An additional 6 to 8 inches of rain is forecast in the Olympic Peninsula while the rest of western Washington through the San Francisco Bay area may see rain totals of an inch or more. The Cascades and the northern half of the Sierra Nevada will see heavy snow and gusty winds; the strong winds will reach as far east as Idaho, Nevada and Utah. The storm will weaken on Saturday as it moves eastward through the Great Basin to the northern and central Rockies and mountain snow and gusty winds are expected. A second cold front will arrive Saturday night into Sunday, bringing more rain and snow from Washington, Oregon, and northern California to western sections of Montana and Wyoming.
A third cold front will move into Washington and Oregon early next week.

South
Thunderstorms with some very heavy rain is expected later today or tonight for parts of southeast Texas; rainfall totals may reach 5 to 8 inches with some locally heavier amounts which may cause some flooding. Lighter rain is expected northward into eastern Oklahoma, western Arkansas and Louisiana.
On Saturday the rain will move northwards into the lower Mississippi Valley and the Southeast as it tapers off in Texas and the Gulf region may see rainfall totals of 1 to 2 inches. On Sunday the rain will move into the western portions of Virginia and North Carolina as the rain tapers off in the Southeast, leaving only occasional showers in the region. Northern Florida may see a few thunderstorms on Sunday.

Northeast
As a storm system moves up through the Great Lakes into Canada, the Northeast will see some scattered rain today. The rain will be mostly in New York and New England, with a few showers possible into northern Pennsylvania and New Jersey; areas closer to Canada will see the most rain with rainfall totals from one half to one inch. By Sunday night into Monday the rain will move northwards with the heaviest rain expected from the mid-Atlantic coast to southern New England.

Midwest
The Midwest will be dry today except for a few showers around the Great Lakes. The region will remain dry through Sunday when light showers are possible from western Lake Superior to Kansas as well as a few showers moving southward toward the Ohio River. (NOAA’s National Weather Service, Various Media Sources)

Tropical Weather Outlook

Atlantic
Tropical cyclone formation is not expected during the next 48 hours.
Eastern Pacific
Tropical cyclone formation is not expected during the next 48 hours.
Central Pacific
No tropical cyclones are expected through Saturday afternoon.
Western Pacific
No activity threatening United States Territories. (NOAA, HPC, National Hurricane Center, Central Pacific Hurricane Center and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center)
Earthquake Activity

Preliminary Damage Assessments

Severe Weather PDAs
Nor’easter created by Tropical Storm Ida November 13-14:
New Jersey:
• IA and PA PDAs continue in Atlantic and Cape May and Ocean counties. PDAs in Monmouth, Cumberland, Middlesex and Burlington have yet to be scheduled.
Virginia:
• IA PDAs that began November 16 in Virginia Beach, Norfolk, Newport News, Chesapeake, Poquoson, and Hampton have been completed.
• PA PDAs continue in Norfolk, Hampton, Virginia Beach, and Newport News.
Delaware:
• PA PDAs continue in Kent and Sussex counties.
Alabama:
• PA PDAs continue in Mobile and Baldwin Counties.
North Carolina:
• PA PDAs for Dare, Hyde and Currituck Counties are scheduled to begin November 23.
Storms created by Tropical Storm Ida on October 29, 2009:
Louisiana
• IA and PA PDAs continue in Bossier, Caddo and Webster Parishes.

Wildfire Update

Note: Fire season is coming to an end - the National Interagency Coordination Center will issue reports only on Fridays unless there is significant activity.
• National Preparedness Level: 1
• National Fire Activity as of Friday, November 13, 2009
• Initial attack activity: Light (108 new fires)
• New large fires: 1
• Large fires contained: 1
• Uncontained large fires: 0
• States affected: AZ and MO (NIFC)

Disaster Declaration Activity

On November 19, 2009 the Governor of Arkansas requested a Major Disaster Declaration due to severe storms, tornadoes, and flooding beginning October 29, 2009 and continuing. The Governor is requesting Public Assistance, including direct Federal assistance, for 37 Counties and Hazard Mitigation statewide. (FEMA HQ)

Last Modified: Friday, 20-Nov-2009 07:47:46 EST
Member Since: August 19, 2008 Posts: 32 Comments: 1918
Quoting AwakeInMaryland:

Luckily, he won't care. All he needs is love and fun. You might need these post-birthday cake, though!

Include in Disaster Clean-up Kit

I am sure those would help.He is my 4th. Grandkids are the best.
Member Since: September 11, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 263
Quoting HurricaneNewbie:

Another wet W/E. Oh well grandsons 1st B'day is going to be a wet one.

Luckily, he won't care. All he needs is love and fun. You might need these post-birthday cake, though!

Include in Disaster Clean-up Kit
Member Since: August 19, 2008 Posts: 32 Comments: 1918
682. IKE
Quoting HurricaneNewbie:

Another wet W/E. Oh well grandsons 1st B'day is going to be a wet one.


We need some rain here in the Florida panhandle. Looks like one-inch+ with the gulf low.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
On a different note, Flood should be waking up to the shift change vital sign check.
Member Since: September 11, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 263
Quoting IKE:


It's in the forecast....

"Saturday: A 50 percent chance of showers after 1pm. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 62. East wind between 5 and 10 mph.

Saturday Night: Occasional showers. Low around 48. East wind between 10 and 15 mph, with gusts as high as 20 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%.

Sunday: A 50 percent chance of showers. Cloudy, with a high near 56. East wind between 5 and 10 mph."

Another wet W/E. Oh well grandsons 1st B'day is going to be a wet one.
Member Since: September 11, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 263
Quoting P451:
Developing nor'easter.



A nor'easter in the GOM? Surely you jest...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
678. IKE
Quoting HurricaneNewbie:
What do you expect to become of that explosion of water vapor along the Texas coast? I see more rain for Atlanta. Thoughts?


It's in the forecast....

"Saturday: A 50 percent chance of showers after 1pm. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 62. East wind between 5 and 10 mph.

Saturday Night: Occasional showers. Low around 48. East wind between 10 and 15 mph, with gusts as high as 20 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%.

Sunday: A 50 percent chance of showers. Cloudy, with a high near 56. East wind between 5 and 10 mph."
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What do you expect to become of that explosion of water vapor along the Texas coast? I see more rain for Atlanta. Thoughts?
Member Since: September 11, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 263
676. IKE
New York, New York....

"LONG TERM /MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY/...
MODELS HAVE TRENDED TOWARD A MORE OPEN...SLOWER AND SUPPRESSED
COASTAL LOW SOLUTION FOR SUN NIGHT-MON NIGHT. IN ANY CASE...WITH
GOOD EASTERLY FLOW BETWEEN THIS SYSTEM AND STRONG HIGH PRESSURE
OVER NORTHERN NEW ENGLAND AND THE CANADIAN MARITIMES...RAIN STILL
APPEARS LIKELY FROM LATE SUN NIGHT INTO MON...POSSIBLY INTO MON
NIGHT-TUE."
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting P451:
Developing nor'easter.



Looks to be a nasty one. Hopefully it drags a tail through the lower peninsula, need some rain down here. Seems it's dipping a little further south than what was modeled.
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I LIKE 60's in November! Pls. feel free to send it this way.
Member Since: August 19, 2008 Posts: 32 Comments: 1918
670. beell

Re the WATTSUP

Lets pretend that this centers around the World Metrological Organization's recommendation of using a 30 year period for the "estimation of climatic variables characterizing the current climate".

The current period is 1961-1990. It will be a while until we have a new 30 yr standard (1991-2020) to compare the temps against. Maybe the last ten years data does not support the conclusions reached using the previous 30 yr yardstick.

Also interesting to note: "An unknown person put postings on some climate skeptic websites that advertsied an FTP file on a Russian FTP server..."

Ran across this link which sparked a quirky thought:
DETECTION OF CHANGES IN CLIMATE STATE, CLIMATE
VARIABILITY AND CLIMATE EXTREMITY
Gruza G., Rankova E., Institute for Global Climate and Ecology (IGCE), Russia

Seems the big huge country (THINK HUGE) we used to call Russia was late-starter in gathering
accurate data. Some hiccups along the way also. Across this vast expanse of climate(s) and area. If I was a conspiracy theorist, I would immediately assume that there is a huge hole in the '61-'90 data for the Northern Hemisphere (NH). Call off Copenhagen, start all over again...

"No! No, that simply vill not do! Ve muust adjust ze trend!"

Que the Twilight Zone Theme...
Member Since: September 11, 2007 Posts: 144 Comments: 16770
Gotcha Storm. I know how track plays with the gales. Amazing what 50 miles will do. Either get have to dig ourselves out or put the waders on LOL

Appears that with the NAO and AO going south for the winter we can be seeing prolonged cold spells. I can't wait =) 60s in November is not my cup of tea.
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Quoting leftovers:
cooler weather= probally why the snook have been biting this fall still shorts and tea shirt weather e cent. florida


Where u at leftovers?

I got a 31 inch keeper on the flat just north of the inlet this week.
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LOL Storm looks like the AO is set to bomb out end of the month. Could be my first real rou8nd of winter weather. That last big dip was around my wedding when we got snow =) A white wedding (dont start with the billy idol references) was a nice surprise.

Whats your thoughts around that time? I know some long ranges shoot a munch of gales up the seaboard but that far out seems kinda sketchy to believe.
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Posted on: Thursday, November 19, 2009

Kauai rains prompt disaster declaration
Mayor says Hanalei Valley farmers most affected by storm

Advertiser Staff

Kaua'i Mayor Bernard Carvalho Jr. yesterday issued a disaster declaration following last weekend's damaging rains and flooding.
The declaration authorizes the mayor to spend county money "for public purposes during any state of emergency or disaster."

"The ongoing effects of this disaster have caused economic loss and hardships particularly to the farmers in Hanalei Valley," the declaration said.

The disaster declaration is effective through Friday, with the possibility of an extension.

Kaua'i, which received the brunt of last weekend's torrential rains, was hit with everything from flooding to landslides, evacuated homes to closed roads and bridges, and even a dead cow that washed up on Lydgate Beach.

Carvalho on Saturday authorized Parks and Recreations personnel to open the Kílauea Neighborhood Center to use as an emergency shelter due to flooding. Seventeen people in Hanalei Valley were evacuated, the Hanalei Bridge was shut down and water spilled over the banks of the Hanalei River.

The National Weather Service said the Hanalei River area saw 15-plus inches of rain in 12 hours Saturday.
Member Since: August 19, 2008 Posts: 32 Comments: 1918
Gov. Dave Heineman Signs Disaster Declaration
Lincoln
Gov. Dave Heineman has signed a state disaster declaration to help in the recovery process after this week's severe winter storm in Southeast Nebraska.
Posted: 6:54 PM Nov 19, 2009
Reporter: KOLNKGIN
Email Address: desk@1011now.com

Gov. Dave Heineman has signed a state disaster declaration to help in the recovery process after this week's severe winter storm in Southeast Nebraska.

The storm produced high winds and heavy wet snow in Gage, Jefferson, Nemaha, Pawnee, Richardson, and Thayer Counties.

Preliminary damage estimates from the Nebraska Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) total more than $3 million.

NEMA Assistant Director Al Berndt says "high winds and heavy snow caused power lines to fall and power poles to break, along with significant damage to area roads and trees. The extent of the damage means this will likely be a long-term process for these counties. We will work closely with local agencies to help move the recovery along.
A disaster declaration makes state resources available to help with recovery in storm damaged areas. NEMA officials continue to work with local and county emergency managers to assess the scope of damage, and will coordinate with the Federal Emergency Management Agency to determine whether thresholds for federal assistance have been met."
Member Since: August 19, 2008 Posts: 32 Comments: 1918
657. IKE
258 hours....
12 minutes....and it's officially over....

TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOK
NWS TPC/NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL
700 AM EST FRI NOV 20 2009

FOR THE NORTH ATLANTIC...CARIBBEAN SEA AND THE GULF OF MEXICO...

TROPICAL CYCLONE FORMATION IS NOT EXPECTED DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS.

$$
FORECASTER AVILA
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656. IKE
Quoting MisterJohnny:
Good Morning, Ike


Morning.

Looking at long-range models and reading what Accuweather says, the winter of 2009 will be approaching soon....

Cold in the east...coming up.
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Good Morning, Ike
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654. IKE
Cold-air moving into the east and SE USA by Turkey day and Friday....

6Z GFS @ 174 hours...

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Pearlandaggie 633 - Just saw your note. Been off chasing that bombshell at WattsUP that you slid in just prior - what a turn of events.

Yeah, being boarded by the Coasties was a real pleasure. We had been out of the country for several weeks. To be run down by a Cutter (a ship of war as they claimed) was just a great welcome back for this old retiree! After having to bribe our way out of the DR where graft is a way of life, it truly was a real special event in an otherwise uneventful passage. Note how flat the water was.
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drinking crow and eating beer. anyone else?

ida just will not die, I see red convection.

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651. xcool
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Quoting Greyelf:


See post right above yours with link to another blog for these updates. Therein you shall find your answer.

Yeah that's bad, i totally forgot to backtrack the comments, i need to re-educate myself on the net, one week is tooooo long, thanks
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Quoting EtexJC:
what exactly happened to flood, i've been offline


See post right above yours with link to another blog for these updates. Therein you shall find your answer.
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RE Post 640 - Lighten up, Francis. Ain't much else to be talking about.
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Is any one having trouble looking at location forecast? Such as Virgini Beach VA or Corpus Chisti Tx. When I try to type in Corpus Christi TX it is blank with Corpus Christi WEER TEXAS...help
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I'm know I'm a bit behind, but had to reinstall windows, what exactly happened to flood, i've been offline for 2 weeks now (failed HD and accidently stepped onto my only copy of XP)
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Evening, all...been a long day and a difficult evening, but Flood is finally resting comfortably. Updates can now be found here:

Link

Thank you all for your kindness and support!!
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Corpus Christi Bay Area (Ingleside)

Surface low/trough forming along Texas coastal Bend. 3.02 inches since 1700 local.
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Dang, doubled and no modify. Sometimes the boysenberry works here fine...sometimes not fine.
Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 6 Comments: 12463
621: That could get really ugly...true or false, I guess it already has, really
Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 6 Comments: 12463
621: That could get really ugly...true or false, I guess it already has, really
Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 6 Comments: 12463
WIND WARNING: Greater Victoria Issued at 3:41 PM PST THURSDAY 19 NOVEMBER 2009

SOUTHERLY WINDS OF 50 TO 70 KM/H TO DEVELOP OVER WEST VANCOUVER ISLAND AND WEST FRASER VALLEY. THIS IS A WARNING THAT POTENTIALLY DAMAGING WINDS ARE EXPECTED OR OCCURRING IN THESE REGIONS. MONITOR WEATHER CONDITIONS..LISTEN FOR UPDATED STATEMENTS.

AN INTENSE LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM CROSSING VANCOUVER ISLAND WILL BRING RAIN HEAVY AT TIMES TONIGHT TO METRO VANCOUVER, FRASER VALLEY AND HOWE SOUND. AN ADDITIONAL 20 TO 50 MM OF RAIN IS EXPECTED FOR METRO VANCOUVER AND FRASER VALLEY, AND HOWE SOUND BY FRIDAY MORNING. MEANWHILE WHISTLER CAN EXPECT 15 TO 25 CM OF SNOW BY FRIDAY AFTERNOON. IN ADDITION, THE LOW WILL SPREAD SOUTHERLY WINDS OF 50 TO 70 KM/H TO WEST VANCOUVER ISLAND GREATER VICTORIA THE SOUTHERN GULF ISLANDS AND WESTERN SECTIONS OF THE FRASER VALLEY EARLY THIS EVENING. THE WINDS ARE EXPECTED TO EASE LATER THIS EVENING AS THE LOW APPROACHES THE BRITISH COLUMBIA INTERIOR.
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Quoting msphar:
You're just bragging aren't ya Orca. How about sharing some of that wet stuff and shove it down the coast for a bit. The Sierra is in need.


I was thinking of stuffing some of this wet stuff somewhere :)

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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