July hurricane outlook

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 7:26 PM GMT on July 02, 2009

Share this Blog
4
+

Atlantic tropical cyclone activity typically picks up a bit during the first half of July. Since the current active hurricane period began in 1995, seven of 14 years (50%) have had a named storm form during the first half of July. The busiest first half of July occurred in 2005, when three hurricanes formed. These included Hurricane Dennis and Hurricane Emily--the strongest hurricanes ever observed so early in the season. As seen in Figure 1, most of the early July activity occurs in the Gulf of Mexico, Western Caribbean, and Carolina waters. However, a few long-track "Cape Verdes" hurricanes begin to occur. These are spawned by tropical waves that come off the coast of Africa. Tropical waves serve as the instigators of about 85% of all major hurricanes. Last year's Hurricane Bertha was one such rare early July Cape Verdes hurricane. Bertha's 120 mph winds made it the sixth strongest early-season Atlantic hurricane on record. Bertha also set the record for farthest east formation as a tropical storm, hurricane, and major hurricane, so early in the season.


Figure 1. Tracks of all tropical storms and hurricanes 1851 - 2006 that formed July 1-15. North Carolina and the Gulf of Mexico coast from the Florida Panhandle to Texas are the preferred strike locations. Oddly, the Florida Peninsula has been struck by only two storms that formed in the first half of July.

Sea Surface Temperatures
Sea Surface Temperatures (SST) anomalies have warmed slightly over the past two weeks, but are close to average over the tropical Atlantic between Africa and Central America (Figure 2). These are the are the coolest SST anomalies we've seen since 1994. The strength of the Azores-Bermuda high has been near average over the past two weeks, driving near-average trade winds. Stronger-than-average trade winds were observed through most of the period November 2008 - May 2009, which helped cool the tropical Atlantic substantially. Strong winds mix up colder water from the depths and cause greater evaporative cooling. The latest 2-week run of the GFS model predicts continued average-strength trade winds through mid-July, so SSTs should remain near average during this period.

Typically, July tropical storms form over the Gulf of Mexico, Western Caribbean, and Gulf Stream waters just offshore Florida. SSTs are about 1.0°C above average for this time of year in the Gulf of Mexico, but near average elsewhere. July storms typically form when a cold front moves off the U.S. coast and stalls out, with the old frontal boundary serving as a focal point for development of a tropical disturbance. There will be one or two fronts moving off the U.S. coast over the next two weeks, and we will need to watch these for development. Wind shear is too high and SSTs are usually too cold in July to allow African tropical waves to develop into tropical storms. African tropical waves serve as the instigators of about 85% of all major hurricanes,

Figure 2. Sea Surface Temperature (SST) departure from average for July 2, 2009. SSTs were near average over the tropical Atlantic's Main Development region for hurricanes, from Africa to Central America between 10° and 20° North Latitude. Note the large region of above average SSTs along the Equatorial Pacific off the coast of South America, the hallmark of a developing El Niño episode. Image credit: NOAA/NESDIS

El Niño
El Niño conditions continue to amplify over the tropical Eastern Pacific. Ocean temperatures there rose 0.5°C over the past two weeks, and are now 0.45°C above the threshold for El Niño, according to the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (Figure 3). NOAA's Climate Prediction Center issued an El Niño Watch in early June, saying "that conditions are favorable for a transition from neutral to El Niño conditions during June - August 2009". The pattern of changes in surface winds, upper-level winds, sea surface temperatures, and deeper water heat content are all consistent with what has been observed during previous developing El Niños, and latest set of mid-June runs of the El Niño computer models are almost universally calling for El Niño conditions to become well-established for the peak months of hurricane season, August - October. It is likely that Atlantic hurricane activity will be suppressed in 2009 due to the strong upper-level winds and resulting wind shear an El Niño event usually brings to the tropical Atlantic.


Figure 3. Sea Surface Temperature (SST) departure from average for the the equatorial Eastern Pacific (the area 5°N - 5°S, 120°W - 170°W, also called the "Niña 3.4 region"). El Niño conditions exist when the SST in this region rises 0.5°C above average. As of June 28, 2009, SSTs in the Niño 3.4 region had risen to 0.95°C above average. To be considered an "El Niño episode", El Niño conditions must occur for five consecutive months, using 3-month averages. Image credit: Australian Bureau of Meteorology.

Wind shear
Wind shear is usually defined as the difference in wind between 200 mb (roughly 40,000 foot altitude) and 850 mb (roughly 5,000 foot altitude). In most circumstances, wind shear above 20 knots will act to inhibit tropical storm formation. Wind shear below 12 knots is very conducive for tropical storm formation. High wind shear acts to tear a storm apart. The jet stream's band of strong high-altitude winds is the main source of wind shear in July over the Atlantic hurricane breeding grounds, since the jet is very active and located quite far south this time of year.

The jet stream over the past two months has been locked into a pattern where a southern branch (the subtropical jet stream) brings high wind shear over the Caribbean, and a northern branch (the polar jet stream) brings high wind shear offshore of New England. This often leaves a "hole" of low shear between the two branches off the coast of North Carolina, which is where Tropical Depression One formed at the end of May.

The jet stream is forecast (Figure 4) to maintain this two-branch pattern over the coming two weeks. This means that the waters offshore of the Carolinas are the most likely place for a tropical storm to form during this period.


Figure 4. Wind shear in m/s between 200 mb and 850 mb, as forecast by the 06Z July 02, 2009 run of the GFS model. The position and strength of the subtropical jet stream is forecast to change little over the next two weeks, and this jet will bring high wind shear to the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico into mid-July. There will at times be a region of low shear between the polar jet (northern set of arrows on the plots) and the subtropical jet, allowing for possible tropical development off the coast of North Carolina. Wind speeds are given in m/s; multiply by two to get a rough conversion to knots. Thus, the red regions of low shear range from 0 - 16 knots.

Dry air and African dust
June and July are the peak months for dust coming off the coast of Africa, and the Saharan dust storms have been quite active over the past month. Expect dust from Africa to be a major deterrent to any storms that try to form between Africa and the Lesser Antilles Islands in July.

Steering currents
The steering current pattern over the past few weeks has not changed much, and is typical for June and July. We have an active jet stream bringing many troughs of low pressure off the East Coast of the U.S. These troughs are frequent enough and strong enough to recurve any tropical storms or hurricanes that might penetrate north of the Caribbean Sea. Steering current patterns are predictable only about 3 - 5 days in the future, although we can make very general forecasts about the pattern as much as two weeks in advance. At present, it appears that the coming two weeks will maintain the typical July pattern, bringing many troughs of low pressure off the East Coast capable of recurving any July storms that might form. There is no telling what might happen during the peak months of August, September, and October--we might be in for a repeat of the favorable 2006 steering current pattern that recurved every storm out to sea--or the unfavorable 2008 pattern, that steered Ike and Gustav into the Gulf of Mexico.

Summary
Recent history suggests a 50% chance of a named storm occurring in the first half of July. Given that none of the computer models are forecasting tropical storm formation in the coming seven days, and SST and wind shear patterns look pretty average, I'll go with a 20% chance of a named storm forming during the first half of July.

Vote for Mike Theiss as an Antarctica blogger
Extreme weather photographer Mike Theiss, who wrote our Ultimate Chase photography blog for two years until a new job took him to South America, wants your help. He's entering a Quark Expeditions competition to receive an expense-paid 2-week trip to Antarctica, where he will do some intensive photography and blogging. In order to go, he needs the votes to show that he's a popular blogger. So, if you liked his posts while he was blogging for wunderground, and want to see him blog for wunderground during this potential Antarctica voyage, go to http://www.blogyourwaytoantarctica.com/blogs/view /220 and cast a vote. It takes about 3 minutes navigate through the registration and voting process. Mike will be back chasing hurricanes this August, and has promised to post his excellent storm photos on wunderground should we help him secure the Antarctica gig.

Have a great holiday weekend, and I'll be back Monday with a new post.

Jeff Masters

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 1997 - 1947

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47Blog Index

1997. Dar9895
Quoting Patrap:

From Martinique to Dominican Republic were free of any storm. But for the 1995 and 2004 warnings were most impressive even less active.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
El Nino leaves the Eastern Caribbean drier than normal so I don't favor El Nino events. In fact, El Nino is more costly than beneficial globally.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1995. beell
And then, there are 40-50 knot winds from the north moving in behind the building upper ridge over TX and the CONUS trough. The return of the shear (as posted earlier).

I could get some rain outta this!

18Z GFS at 84 hrs.
Link
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting druseljic:
Been here for years and prefer to lurk..you know you learn the most that way :-)! The blog appears to be heating up so I guess the season is on. I must admit I love watching these systems, the dynamics of nature are fascinating...but hopefully 2009 will be a merciful one.
Don't be fooled, with the lack of activity this blog gets heated up by a mere cluster of t-storms. The season is not heating up by any means. Whether it will be "on" is yet to be determined.

Remember, it only takes ONE...
Member Since: August 15, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2515
Quoting Weather456:
It also seems it maybe a short-live event. Weakening during winter 2009-2010



Exactly, so it will probably never become a strong one....maybe at best a weak moderate one, but could remain a weak one...like 2004 had. So, BenBlogger is a troll and is clearly wrong and should stop posting. He is now on my ignore list.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting CybrTeddy:


Ben's a troll Taz.


A hurricane will be over your house this summer. Happy Now!!!!!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Weather456:
It also seems it maybe a short-live event. Weakening during winter 2009-2010




oh no it dont we cant take other dry winter here in CA make it go stronger and stronger
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Levi32:


There is a tropical wave along 81W that is enhancing convection there but it is bound for the eastern Pacific. It won't develop in the Caribbean.



Levi...

What are your thoughts on:
1) the wave that just emerged off the African coast
2) activity over the next 2 weeks
3) environmental conditions over the next few weeks because I looked at a few shear models and they are showing VERY favorable conditions over the ENTIRE Atlantic next week, the most favorable conditions all season.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1989. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 170 Comments: 53454
Quoting AllStar17:



No

And, BenBlogger is just saying things to get reactions, and has no base to his posts. Just ignore him because he is a troll.


I am a troll for disagreeing with you guys?

WOW
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
AOI
MARK
16.0N/71.1W



still got covection
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
It also seems it maybe a short-live event. Weakening during winter 2009-2010

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Tazmanian:
well BenBIogger could be right about one thing el nino could become moderate to strong


Ben's a troll Taz.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1984. Levi32
Quoting stormwatcherCI:

What about the blob in the SW corner of the Caribbean. Any chance for development there?


There is a tropical wave along 81W that is enhancing convection there but it is bound for the eastern Pacific. It won't develop in the Caribbean.

Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26585
Quoting stormwatcherCI:

What about the blob in the SW corner of the Caribbean. Any chance for development there?



No

And, BenBlogger is just saying things to get reactions, and has no base to his posts. Just ignore him because he is a troll.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Been here for years and prefer to lurk..you know you learn the most that way :-)! The blog appears to be heating up so I guess the season is on. I must admit I love watching these systems, the dynamics of nature are fascinating...but hopefully 2009 will be a merciful one.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Levi32:


I don't think you have anything to worry about =)
Sounds good coming from someone who seems to know what they are talking about.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1980. Levi32
Quoting stormwatcherCI:
I am keeping my fingers crossed for NO development from it because where it is sitting now and with the westward movement would spell trouble for the Cayman Islands.


I don't think you have anything to worry about =)
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26585

What about the blob in the SW corner of the Caribbean. Any chance for development there?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Weak to Moderate El Nino Expected. The pacific is not warming at a rate that would indicate, moderate to strong this summer. Probably higher during the fall.

During the Jun-Aug season there is an approximately 56% probability of at least weak El Nino conditions, and a 43% probability of retaining ENSO-neutral conditions.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1977. beell
An interesting look at 700mb. Where tropical ridge meets CONUS trough.

18Z 700mb GFS at 84 hours.
Link
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
My Prediction this season

4 named storms
1 Hurricane
0 major hurricane

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Levi32:


I know, but it only looks impressive because of the TUTT enhancing its convection. Sometimes this can help it develop when the TUTT pulls out but it's not going to pull out much anytime soon. There is also very little surface convergence due to strong easterlies throughout the Caribbean. If it's going to have a chance it will be farther west.
I am keeping my fingers crossed for NO development from it because where it is sitting now and with the westward movement would spell trouble for the Cayman Islands.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting BenBIogger:




Sorry this season ain't gonna be fun for you, But El Nino tends to lower tropical development in the atlantic,



yup El Nino is on the way looking forword to th ESNO
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1973. Levi32
Quoting stormwatcherCI:
But, it seems to be firing pretty good right now but don't know for how long.


I know, but it only looks impressive because of the TUTT enhancing its convection. Sometimes this can help it develop when the TUTT pulls out but it's not going to pull out much anytime soon. There is also very little surface convergence due to strong easterlies throughout the Caribbean. If it's going to have a chance it will be farther west.
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26585
Quoting AllStar17:
Please DO NOT QUOTE BENBLOGGER!!!!!!!!

HE IS A TROLL




Sorry this season ain't gonna be fun for you, But El Nino tends to lower tropical development in the atlantic,
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1971. Levi32
Quoting Dar9895:

I'am very agree you but I might think the activity will start mid July until late September after that it will be dimished.
I foresee a total of 12 named storms, 6 hurricanes and 3 major. So in July I expected 2 named storms, in August 4 named storms, September 4 named storm and October and November each 1 named storm. Something similar to 1979,1989,1999 hurricane seasons with a late start. If it is an usual el nino at this time the Pacific had more than 3 to 4 named storm, but it is not the case and I believe in an El Nino MODOKI.


Well those years you mentioned were not late starters, and 89 was actually more active than normal in July.

El Nino Modoki is not what we have this season, at least right now. The center of the warming is where it should be, right in the far eastern Pacific:

Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26585
well BenBIogger could be right about one thing el nino could become moderate to strong
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Levi32:


That is exactly why it is not mentioned in the TWO. It is mentioned as a wave in the tropical discussion, but it doesn't have the potential for development right now to warrant any recognition in the TWO by the NHC.

Yeah I agree with 456. An above-average season seems unlikely to me, but there still may be high impact on the US and other land areas due to storms forming closer to home within 2-3 days of land.
But, it seems to be firing pretty good right now but don't know for how long.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1968. Levi32
Quoting AllStar17:
The NHC continues to be too conservative this season, IMO.

This wave in the Central Caribbean deserves to be mentioned. Now, it probably will not develop, but they do not even mention it. Confusing, IMO


That is exactly why it is not mentioned in the TWO. It is mentioned as a wave in the tropical discussion, but it doesn't have the potential for development right now to warrant any recognition in the TWO by the NHC.
Quoting Acemmett90:

agreed can't wait to see there faces when its a record seasonlol hope it isn't though


Yeah I agree with 456. An above-average season seems unlikely to me, but there still may be high impact on the US and other land areas due to storms forming closer to home within 2-3 days of land.
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26585
1967. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
TROPICAL CYCLONE GUIDANCE MESSAGE
NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER
1839 UTC SUN JUL 5 2009

DISCLAIMER...NUMERICAL MODELS ARE SUBJECT TO LARGE ERRORS.
PLEASE REFER TO NHC OFFICIAL FORECASTS FOR TROPICAL CYCLONE
AND SUBTROPICAL CYCLONE INFORMATION.



EAST PACIFIC OBJECTIVE AIDS FOR

DISTURBANCE INVEST (EP942009) 20090705 1800 UTC



...00 HRS... ...12 HRS... ...24 HRS. .. ...36 HRS...

090705 1800 090706 0600 090706 1800 090707 0600



LAT LON LAT LON LAT LON LAT LON

BAMS 16.4N 109.9W 17.4N 112.2W 18.0N 114.3W 18.5N 116.4W

BAMD 16.4N 109.9W 17.1N 112.0W 17.6N 114.0W 18.1N 116.0W

BAMM 16.4N 109.9W 17.2N 112.0W 17.7N 114.1W 18.2N 116.0W

LBAR 16.4N 109.9W 17.1N 112.4W 17.9N 115.3W 18.6N 118.2W

SHIP 25KTS 27KTS 31KTS 34KTS

DSHP 25KTS 27KTS 31KTS 34KTS



...48 HRS... ...72 HRS... ...96 HRS. .. ..120 HRS...

090707 1800 090708 1800 090709 1800 090710 1800



LAT LON LAT LON LAT LON LAT LON

BAMS 18.9N 118.3W 19.5N 121.7W 19.8N 125.0W 19.7N 128.2W

BAMD 18.5N 118.1W 19.3N 121.9W 20.5N 125.2W 21.7N 128.0W

BAMM 18.6N 118.1W 19.5N 121.9W 20.4N 125.2W 21.2N 128.2W

LBAR 19.5N 121.3W 22.3N 126.0W 27.0N 127.7W 33.9N 124.9W

SHIP 36KTS 35KTS 30KTS 24KTS

DSHP 36KTS 35KTS 30KTS 24KTS



...INITIAL CONDITIONS...

LATCUR = 16.4N LONCUR = 109.9W DIRCUR = 280DEG SPDCUR = 13KT

LATM12 = 16.0N LONM12 = 107.3W DIRM12 = 282DEG SPDM12 = 13KT

LATM24 = 15.2N LONM24 = 104.7W

WNDCUR = 25KT RMAXWD = 90NM WNDM12 = 25KT

CENPRS = 1008MB OUTPRS = 1011MB OUTRAD = 150NM SDEPTH = M

RD34NE = 0NM RD34SE = 0NM RD34SW = 0NM RD34NW = 0NM



$$

NNNN
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 170 Comments: 53454
Please DO NOT QUOTE BENBLOGGER!!!!!!!!

HE IS A TROLL
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Looks like former 94L at least to me could actually be STS right now IMO at least looking at the quikscat.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1964. Dakster
I'd rather have an active season where the storms don't hit land (especially ME!) then a late starting, low number of storms and have the one CAT 5 that forms hit land.. Ala circa 1992 where the first storm formed in late AUGUST.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1963. Dar9895
Quoting Levi32:


I've read about it, and it makes sense. If the center of the warming, and hence the upward motion, is further west in the Pacific, then everything else shifts west with it. That puts less wind shear and warmer SSTs over the tropical Atlantic and overall conditions become more favorable.

I'am very agree you but I might think the activity will start mid July until late September after that it will be dimished.
I foresee a total of 12 named storms, 6 hurricanes and 3 major. So in July I expected 2 named storms, in August 4 named storms, September 4 named storm and October and November each 1 named storm with an total ACE between 100 and 150. Something similar to 1979,1989,1999 hurricane seasons with a late start. If it is an usual el nino at this time the Pacific had more than 3 to 4 named storm, but it is not the case and I believe in an El Nino MODOKI.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
The NHC continues to be too conservative this season, IMO.

This wave in the Central Caribbean deserves to be mentioned. Now, it probably will not develop, but they do not even mention it. Confusing, IMO
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Interesting, they are more confident this will become a depression after it looked rather disorganized this afternoon. It is making a comeback tonight.

000
ABPZ20 KNHC 052345
TWOEP
TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOK
NWS TPC/NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL
500 PM PDT SUN JUL 5 2009

FOR THE EASTERN NORTH PACIFIC...EAST OF 140 DEGREES WEST LONGITUDE..

SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS ASSOCIATED WITH AN AREA OF LOW PRESSURE
LOCATED ABOUT 425 MILES SOUTH OF THE SOUTHERN TIP OF BAJA CALIFORNIA
CONTINUE TO SHOW SIGNS OF ORGANIZATION. CONDITIONS ARE MARGINALLY
FAVORABLE FOR DEVELOPMENT...AND THIS SYSTEM HAS THE POTENTIAL TO
BECOME A TROPICAL DEPRESSION TONIGHT OR MONDAY
AS IT MOVES WEST-
NORTHWESTWARD AT 10 TO 15 MPH. THERE IS A MEDIUM CHANCE...30 TO 50
PERCENT...OF THIS SYSTEM BECOMING A TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE
NEXT 48 HOURS.

ELSEWHERE...TROPICAL CYCLONE FORMATION IS NOT EXPECTED DURING THE
NEXT 48 HOURS.

$$
FORECASTER PASCH
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1959. beell
18Z 700mb theta e at 84 hrs.
Looks wave-ish but ultimately comes ashore on the western shores of the BOC-according to the model.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Acemmett90:

agreed can't wait to see there faces when its a record seasonlol hope it isn't though


Trust me, I don't think it would be an above average season. But it seems we may see a concentration of Tc activity.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1957. Patrap
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Weather456:
lol the blogs started in 2005, those give you idea if the blog existed in 2004.


But you know if it did, they would be making the same comments.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting AllStar17:
I think we are getting a bit too caught up in El Nino. Do not forget, 2004 had a weak El Nino and had a lot of storms overall, and some storms in the Caribbean as well. This year also has a weak El Nino, and we will see what happens numbers-wise as the season progresses.


enough with the 04 comments This el nino will be moderate or strong!

expect less than 7 named storms this season.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
lol the blogs started in 2005, those give you idea if the blog existed in 2004.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting StSimonsIslandGAGuy:
I am going by a temporal basis stormpetrol :)


I understand and its also correct :)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Weather456:
2004:

938. Storm 7:36 PM AST on July 05, 2004

The season over, what a dud.

938. WU88 9:36 AM AST on July 21, 2004

I don't think this season will every start.

938. W456 10:36 AM AST on July 28, 2004

El Nino will keep the season quiet, nothing to worry about.

Dennis


Some similar comments have been made this season, as well. Those comments are a big shame.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Weather456:
2004 Virtual Reality

938. Storm 7:36 PM AST on July 05, 2004

The season over, what a dud.

1024. WU88 9:36 AM AST on July 21, 2004

I don't think this season will every start.

138. W456 10:36 AM AST on July 28, 2004

El Nino will keep the season quiet, nothing to worry about.

Dennis
Deja Vu
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
AOI
MARK
16.0N/71.1W

I thought it looked a little further N than it did earlier and seems to be firing convection at that area.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Viewing: 1997 - 1947

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

Local Weather

Overcast
71 °F
Overcast