Sea level rise: what has happened so far

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:05 PM GMT on June 10, 2009

Share this Blog
4
+

Sea level has been rising globally since the late 1700s. This rise has accelerated in recent decades, thanks to increased melting of glaciers and ice sheets due to a warmer climate, plus the fact that warmer oceans are less dense and expand, further increasing sea level. Though sea level rise appears to have slowed over the past five years, it will significantly accelerate if the climate warms the 2 - 3°C it is expected to this century. If these forecasts of a warmer world prove accurate, higher sea levels will be a formidable challenge for millions of people world-wide during the last half of this century. Sea level rise represents one of my personal top two climate change concerns (drought is the other). I'll present a series of blog posts over the coming months focusing on at-risk areas in the U.S., Caribbean, and world-wide. Today, I focus on the observed sea level rise since the Ice Age.

What's at stake
Higher sea levels mean increased storm surge inundation, coastal erosion, loss of low-lying land areas, and salt water contamination of underground drinking water supplies. About 44% of the Earth's 6.7 billion people live within 150 km (93 miles) of the coast, and 600 million people live at an elevation less than ten meters (33 feet). Eight of the ten largest cities in the world are sited on the ocean coast. In the U.S., the coastal population has doubled over the past 50 years. Fourteen of the twenty largest urban centers are located within 100 km of the coast, and are less than ten meters above sea level (McGranahan et al., 2007). The population of many vulnerable coastal regions are expected to double by 2050, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Sea level rise since the Ice Age
Before the most recent Ice Age, sea level was about 4 - 6 meters (13 - 20 feet) higher than at present. Then, during the Ice Age, sea level dropped 120 meters (395 ft) as water evaporated from the oceans precipitated out onto the great land-based ice sheets. The former ocean water remained frozen in those ice sheets during the Ice Age, but began being released 12,000 - 15,000 years ago as the Ice Age ended and the climate warmed. Sea level increased about 115 meters over a several thousand year period, rising 40 mm/year (1.6"/yr) during one 500-year pulse of melting 14,600 years ago. The rate of sea level rise slowed to 11 mm/year (0.43"/yr) during the period 7,000 - 14,000 years ago (Bard et al., 1996), then further slowed to 0.5 mm/yr 6,000 - 3,000 years ago. About 2,000 - 3,000 years ago, the sea level stopped rising, and remained fairly steady until the late 1700s (IPCC 2007). One exception to this occurred during the Medieval Warm Period of 1100 - 1200 A.D., when warm conditions similar to today's climate caused the sea level to rise 5 - 8" (12 - 21 cm) higher than present (Grinsted et al., 2008). This was probably the highest the sea has been since the beginning of the Ice Age, 110,000 years ago. There is a fair bit of uncertainty in all these estimates, since we don't have direct measurements of the sea level.


Figure 1. Global sea level from 200 A.D. to 2000, as reconstructed from proxy records of sea level by Moberg et al. 2005. The thick black line is reconstructed sea level using tide gauges (Jevrejeva, 2006). The lightest gray shading shows the 5 - 95% uncertainty in the estimates, and the medium gray shading denotes the one standard deviation error estimate. The highest global sea level of the past 110,000 years likely occurred during the Medieval Warm Period of 1100 - 1200 A.D., when warm conditions similar to today's climate caused the sea level to rise 5 - 8" (12 - 21 cm) higher than present. Image credit: Grinsted, A., J.C. Moore, and S. Jevrejeva, 2009, "Reconstructing sea level from paleo and projected temperatures 200 to 2100 AD", Climate Dynamics, DOI 10.1007/s00382-008-0507-2, 06 January 2009.

Sea level rise over the past 300 years
Direct measurements of sea level using tide gauges began in Amsterdam in 1700. Additional tide gauges began recording data in Liverpool, England in 1768 and in Stockholm, Sweden in 1774. These gauges suggest that a steady acceleration of sea rise of 0.01 mm per year squared began in the late 1700s, resulting in a rise in sea level of 2.4" (6 cm, 0.6 mm/yr) during the 19th century and 7.5" (19 cm, 1.9 mm/yr) during the 20th century (Jevrejeva et al., 2008). There is considerable uncertainty in just how much sea level rise has occurred over the past few centuries, though. Measuring global average sea level rise is a very tricky business. For starters, one must account for the tides, which depend on the positions of the Earth and Moon on a cycle that repeats itself once every 18.6 years. Tide gauges are scattered, with varying lengths of record. The data must be corrected since land is sinking in some regions, due to pumping of ground water, oil and gas extraction, and natural compaction of sediments. Also, the land is rising in other regions, such as Northern Europe, where it is rebounding from the lost weight of the melted glaciers that covered the region during the last Ice Age. Ocean currents, precipitation, and evaporation can cause a 20 inch (50 cm) difference in sea level in different portions of the ocean. As a result of all this uncertainty, the 1996 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report gave a range of 4 - 10" (10 - 25 cm) for the observed sea level rise of the 20th century. The 2007 IPCC report narrowed this range a bit, to 5 - 9" (12 - 22 cm), or 1.2 - 2.2 mm/year. Rates of sea level rise are much higher in many regions. In the U.S., the highest rates of sea-level rise are along the Mississippi Delta region--over 10 mm/yr, or 1 inch/2.5 years (USGS, 2006). This large relative rise is due, in large part, to the fact that the land is sinking.


Figure 2. Absolute sea level rise between 1955 and 2003 as computed from tide gauges and satellite imagery data. The data has been corrected for the rising or sinking of land due to crustal motions or subsidence of the land, so the relative sea level rise along the coast will be different than this. The total rise (in inches) for the 48-year period is given in the top scale, and the rate in mm/year is given in the bottom scale. The regional sea level variations shown here resulted not only from the input of additional water from melting of glaciers and ice caps, but also from changes in ocean temperature and density, as well as changes in precipitation, ocean currents, and river discharge. Image credit: IPCC, 2007

Sea level rise over the past 15 years
According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 2007 report, sea level accelerated from the 1.2 - 2.2 mm/yr observed during the 20th century to 3.1 mm/year during the period 1993 - 2003. These estimates come from high resolution measurements from satellite radar altimeters, which began in 1992. Tide gauges showed a similar level of sea level rise during that ten-year period. The IPCC attributed more than half of this rise (1.6 mm/yr) to the fact that the ocean expanded in size due to increased temperatures. Another 1.2 mm/yr rise came from melting of Greenland, West Antarctica, and other land-based ice, and about 10% of the rise was unaccounted for. However, during the period 2003 - 2008, sea level rise slowed to 2.5 mm/year, according to measurements of Earth's gravity from the GRACE satellites (Cazenave et al., 2008). This reduction in sea level rise probably occurred because ocean sea surface temperatures have not warmed since 2003 (Figure 3). The authors concluded that sea level rise due to ocean warming decreased more than a factor of five from 2003 - 2008, compared to 1993 - 2003, contributing only 0.3 mm/yr vs. the 1.6 mm/yr previously.


Figure 3. Global average sea surface temperatures (SSTs) from 1990-2008. SSTs have not increased in the past seven years. Image credit: NASA/GISS.

For more information
The best source of information I found while compiling my sea level pages was the Coastal Sensitivity to Sea-Level Rise: A Focus on the Mid-Atlantic Region report by the U.S. Climate Science Program. It has a huge number of references to all the latest science being done on sea level rise.

References
Bard, E., et al., 1996, "Sea level record from Tahiti corals and the timing of deglacial meltwater discharge", Nature 382, pp241-244, doi:10.1038/382241a0.

Cazenave et al., 2008, "Sea level budget over 2003-2008: A reevaluation from satellite altimetry and Argo", Global and Planetary Change, 2008; DOI:10.1016/j.gloplacha.2008.10.004

Grinsted, A., J.C. Moore, and S. Jevrejeva, 2009, "Reconstructing sea level from paleo and projected temperatures 200 to 2100 AD", Climate Dynamics, DOI 10.1007/s00382-008-0507-2, 06 January 2009.

IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change), 2007: Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Solomon, S., D. Qin, M. Manning, Z. Chen, M. Marquis, K.B. Averyt, M. Tignor, and H.L. Miller (eds.)]. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, and New York, 996 pp.

Jevrejeva, S., J.C. Moore, A. Grinsted,, and P.L. Woodworth, 2008, "Recent global sea level acceleration started over 200 years ago?", Geophysical Research Letters, 35, L08715, doi:10.1029/2008GL033611, 2008.

McGranahan, G., D. Balk, and B. Anderson, 2007, "The rising tide: assessing the risks of climate change and human settlements in low elevation coastal zones", Environment & Urbanization, 19(1), 17-37.

Moberg, A., et al., 2005, "Highly variable northern hemisphere temperature reconstructed from low- and high-resolution proxy data", Nature 433, pp613-617, doi:10.1038/nature03265.

United States Geological Survey (USGS), 2006, National Assessment of Coastal Vulnerability to Sea-Level Rise: Preliminary Results for the U.S. Gulf of Mexico Coast, U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 00-179.

Tropical update
The tropical Atlantic is quiet, and the only region worth watching is the Western Caribbean, which could see formation of a tropical disturbance with heavy thunderstorm activity this weekend.

Jeff Masters

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 1582 - 1532

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37Blog Index

Quoting beell:


Good gosh, yes, ss. It's bad enough taking care of one home refrigerator after a storm-I can just imagine! Yuck!

The natural gas system never lost a second in Houston after Ike. However, if you are in an area that suffers heavy damage-like Bolivar and Galveston Island the gas company may shut-in their system. Makes the clean-up a little safer. All those gas meters buried under debris with bulldozers and backhoes running all over the place.



Before we got the generator, I think it was Hurri Ivan, we used all our food to feed the Emergency crews rather than waste the food. Law Enforcement loved the steaks and seafood. Cooked it on their grills. Was worth every bit of food, those guys were heroes; kept looters at bay and helped those in true need.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting sugarsand:


Zoo, we have a 15,000 hardwired for our house. The restaurant is the big Momma...
These types of generators are very pricey in Cayman and not so easy to get. I have a decent size portable but that was a luxury after Ivan. The first things I plugged in were a deep freeze for the ice, a window unit for the cold air and a couple of lights. Didn't need any more than that because due to damage to the house we were all (4) camping in one room anyway.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1580. beell
I have natural gas. (That doesn't sound good, does it?)

I passed on that, Geoffery. But only, just, barely. Good work!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Some persons expectations for June is too high and it's affecting their best judgement of the rest of the season with comments like "wind shear is too high, no develop until such and such date"

Member Since: July 24, 2005 Posts: 407 Comments: 19076
Beell - I think with devastating damage all bets are off. We can only protect so much, and then its up to god and mother nature.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting sugarsand:


Ps...automatic is the way to go.


Thanks Sugar - I did figure the big one was for the restaurant.

Talking about the food - when everyone talks about having enough food on hand, since we have the ability to run our big freezer, I stock up on things that can be cooked on the grill and stored in the freezer. Makes stocking supplies much easier.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1576. beell
Quoting sugarsand:


We also got a discount through our gas company a few years back for our generator. But that's probably because we installed a 50,000 unit at one of the restaurants. Talk about real peace of mind when you have freezers and coolers full of food.


Good gosh, yes, ss. It's bad enough taking care of one home refrigerator after a storm-I can just imagine! Yuck!

The natural gas system never lost a second in Houston after Ike. However, if you are in an area that suffers heavy damage-like Bolivar and Galveston Island the gas company may shut-in their system. Makes the clean-up a little safer. All those gas meters buried under debris with bulldozers and backhoes running all over the place.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting sugarsand:


Zoo, we have a 15,000 hardwired for our house. The restaurant is the big Momma...


Ps...automatic is the way to go.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting zoomiami:


That is a big generator, I'm tickled with the 15,000 - will at least run one of our central ac units. Although we've been told if we buy new units that have some type of regulator when it kicks in, we could actually run both. But even having one would be such a luxury!


Zoo, we have a 15,000 hardwired for our house. The restaurant is the big Momma...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
For personal safety....First a radio...then a T.V...a laptop would be towards the end of the list.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting sugarsand:


We also got a discount through our gas company a few years back for our generator. But that's probably because we installed a 50,000 unit at one of the restaurants. Talk about real peace of mind when you have freezers and coolers full of food.


That is a big generator, I'm tickled with the 15,000 - will at least run one of our central ac units. Although we've been told if we buy new units that have some type of regulator when it kicks in, we could actually run both. But even having one would be such a luxury!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Trying to run a central A/C on a generator takes a huge amount of fuel. You better have gas piped in or a fuel delivery service under contract - even that could get tough after a storm. A big diesel generator operating on a quiet night is doubly obnoxious - the noise & the smell.
One of these will only use 620watts off of your generator. It has a 12.10 EER. You don't need to cool the whole house to hang meat. Alternate it with your refrigerator, and use the batteries/inverter at night when it needs to be quiet (for a fan, small TV/computer, & fluorescent lights).

If you have a transfer switch, or otherwise power your whole house, or even a couple of circuits, unplug all those transformers "wall warts". They waste a lot of power cumulatively. HVAC, doorbell, etc... all have transformers. More efficient just to use good heavy gauge cords for the few items you power.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1570. TX2FL
Quoting Ossqss:


No, it would allow you to hook up the Digital TV converter to recieve digital TV signals, over the air, and play them on your portable DVD player during a storm. Basically converting your DVD player into a TV. The converters are simply digital tuners with RF-coax and RCA jack outputs. The converter will need an antenna however and rabbit ears will work but not as good as a cheap digital tv antenna. Note, most portable DVD players come with special cables to allow for that if they do not have RCA input jacks on them.

Gotta run, I am late. L8R


Would this work hooking it up to a laptop as well?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Anyone know of any whole-home generators in the West Palm Beach area? I have natural gas. (That doesn't sound good, does it?)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting beell:
An option for some folks if you have natural gas.

Houston's CenterPoint Energy offers 5% discount (up to $2,500) on installed cost of stand-by generators


We also got a discount through our gas company a few years back for our generator. But that's probably because we installed a 50,000 unit at one of the restaurants. Talk about real peace of mind when you have freezers and coolers full of food.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1567. gator23
Quoting stormwatcherCI:
Thanks.


No problem.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting gator23:



The DTV transition does not apply to you. Please continue using your portable tv as normal
Thanks.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1565. gator23

Quoting stormwatcherCI:
No. Cayman Islands.


The DTV transition does not apply to you. Please continue using your portable tv as normal
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1564. beell
An option for some folks if you have natural gas.

Houston's CenterPoint Energy offers 5% discount (up to $2,500) on installed cost of stand-by generators
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting zoomiami:
Some really good ideas here for things to keep us going during the storm.

I'm not a fan of running a generator during the storm itself. We never have turned ours on until the weather has cleared.

Currently installing a hardwired 15,000k house generator - having arguments with electrician over completely automatic vs. a manual switch. Not sure that I would like this to come on either during a storm, or if power goes out & we aren't home. Anyone have experience with either one of these scenarios?



well if you're not home you have freezer/refrigerator to worry about. if it's in a storm you could always throw the main breaker off if you'd rather in not come on. .. just some thoughts
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting gator23:


Are you located in the US?
No. Cayman Islands.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1561. gator23
Quoting stormwatcherCI:
We only have one local TV station here and everything else we get by cable or satellite from the US so I don't know how much good that we do here.


Are you located in the US?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1560. Ossqss
Quoting zoomiami:
Some really good ideas here for things to keep us going during the storm.

I'm not a fan of running a generator during the storm itself. We never have turned ours on until the weather has cleared.

Currently installing a hardwired 15,000k house generator - having arguments with electrician over completely automatic vs. a manual switch. Not sure that I would like this to come on either during a storm, or if power goes out & we aren't home. Anyone have experience with either one of these scenarios?



Have him place a manual cut off or remote start in between. It is the law to have a auto switch. You could kill a worker if you pump power back out if your main is not off. There are solutions there. It just costs money :)
Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8185
1559. Makoto1
BULLETIN - EAS ACTIVATION REQUESTED
FLASH FLOOD WARNING
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WILMINGTON OH
907 PM EDT THU JUN 11 2009

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN WILMINGTON HAS ISSUED A

* FLASH FLOOD WARNING FOR...
NORTHERN MONTGOMERY COUNTY IN WEST CENTRAL OHIO...

* UNTIL 1100 PM EDT.

* AT 904 PM EDT...NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DOPPLER RADAR INDICATED
THAT THUNDERSTORMS HAD PRODUCED HEAVY RAINFALL ACROSS THE WARNED
AREA. RADAR ESTIMATED AS MUCH AS 2 INCHES OF RAIN HAD FALLEN ALONG
INTERSTATE 70 SINCE 730 PM.


* UP TO AN INCH OF ADDITIONAL RAINFALL CAN BE EXPTEDTED. WHILE
RAINFALL WAS BEGINNING TO PULL OUT OF THE AREA...RUNOFF FROM THIS
EARLIER EXCESSIVE RAIN WILL CAUSE FLASH FLOODING TO OCCUR.

SOME LOCATIONS THAT MAY EXPERIENCE FLOODING INCLUDE...ENGLEWOOD...
CLAYTON...HUBER HEIGHTS...NORTHRIDGE...TROTWOOD AND VANDALIA.

This is my night.
Quoting Ossqss:


No, it would allow you to hook up the Digital TV converter to recieve digital TV signals, over the air, and play them on your portable DVD player during a storm. Basically converting your DVD player into a TV. The converters are simply digital tuners with RF-coax and RCA jack outputs. The converter will need an antenna however and rabbit ears will work but not as good as a cheap digital tv antenna. Note, most portable DVD players come with special cables to allow for that if they do not have RCA input jacks on them.

Gotta run, I am late. L8R
We only have one local TV station here and everything else we get by cable or satellite from the US so I don't know how much good that we do here.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Think I'm going to buy a couple of those digitals for me and my dad. They are pretty cheap right now and nice to have around...just in case.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting zoomiami:
Some really good ideas here for things to keep us going during the storm.

I'm not a fan of running a generator during the storm itself. We never have turned ours on until the weather has cleared.

Currently installing a hardwired 15,000k house generator - having arguments with electrician over completely automatic vs. a manual switch. Not sure that I would like this to come on either during a storm, or if power goes out & we aren't home. Anyone have experience with either one of these scenarios?


Hey Zoo,

We have a 15,000 hardwired Generac. It is set to automatic. When we first installed it, the first power outage tripped the switch and hubby had to go out in violent weather to manually turn it on. Not fun. Having it on when you are not home can save your freezer/refrig contents...that's a great thing.
Having A/C even after a blackout from a thunderstorm is worth every penny....not to mention days upon days, sweltering heat after a big blow.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1555. Ossqss
Quoting stormwatcherCI:
That I do have.External source play(would that be like to hook up on a larger tv ? Not very smart when it comes to electronics. Since I have a generator now I normally recharge the DVD player battery when necessary.


No, it would allow you to hook up the Digital TV converter to recieve digital TV signals, over the air, and play them on your portable DVD player during a storm. Basically converting your DVD player into a TV. The converters are simply digital tuners with RF-coax and RCA jack outputs. The converter will need an antenna however and rabbit ears will work but not as good as a cheap digital tv antenna. Note, most portable DVD players come with special cables to allow for that if they do not have RCA input jacks on them.

Gotta run, I am late. L8R
Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8185
1554. gator23
Quoting GeoffreyWPB:
Kinda funny story with me...with Frances and Jeanne, I didn't have power for about a total of a month. With Wilma, which took my roof off, I had power the next day.


If you do not have a digital tv you can use an inverter hooked to a battery in your home. Many inverters have battery leads for this reason. A 300 watt inverter should support both the tv and the and converter.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
The blob seems to be getting very close to Haiti now. One thing they don't need is any more rain.
The invest a couple weeks back gave them more than enough rain. I read that they had a few deaths I assume from drowning. That is the one place they would break anyone's heart.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Some really good ideas here for things to keep us going during the storm.

I'm not a fan of running a generator during the storm itself. We never have turned ours on until the weather has cleared.

Currently installing a hardwired 15,000k house generator - having arguments with electrician over completely automatic vs. a manual switch. Not sure that I would like this to come on either during a storm, or if power goes out & we aren't home. Anyone have experience with either one of these scenarios?

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1551. gator23
Quoting Ossqss:


Digital TV converter. That happens tomorrow. No more rabbit ears and analog Tv's. Posts earlier on the subject.

Note -- lead acid batteries (car) need to be kept charged or they die. No battery of any kind should ever be let to drain completely.

I gave my inverter and battery and fan to the elderly in Punta Gorda and they used it for two days straight without recharge. It was a 120 amphour deepcycle.


Not true. If you recieve your tv over the air you will still need rabbit ears
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Ossqss:


If you have a portable DVD player, many have inputs on them for external souce play. They work wonderfully and don't use much power. Just a couple of RCA cables from the converter and poof, your there.

Have a good night all. L8R
That I do have.External source play(would that be like to hook up on a larger tv ? Not very smart when it comes to electronics. Since I have a generator now I normally recharge the DVD player battery when necessary.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Could that Co2 plot have anything to do with volcanic activity. I only ask because that area seems to be the most sighted area for Co2 levels.I'm not trying to stir the pot just asking why this is the main sight. I do think there is gw although.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1548. Ossqss
Quoting hurricane23:


Got mine a few weeks back with a 400 Watt Inverter to charge in my car.Go here for some 7inch Widescreen Portable Handheld DIGITAL Color TV's.


If you have a portable DVD player, many have inputs on them for external souce play. They work wonderfully and don't use much power. Just a couple of RCA cables from the converter and poof, your there.

Have a good night all. L8R
Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8185
Quoting Patrap:
Portable Digital TV's are already available,a Lil Pricey,but lower priced brands are coming out every week now seems.




Got mine a few weeks back with a 400 Watt Inverter to charge in my car.Go here for some 7inch Widescreen Portable Handheld DIGITAL Color TV's.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Ossqss:
Is that a circulation over the S Bahama's?


Circulation is in the upper levels no development.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
These are good discussions while we are waiting for a invest.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1542. Ossqss
Quoting stormwatcherCI:
What is a DTV converter ? Tried to use a car battery and inverter after Ivan to run a fan to sleep but by the time I started to doze off the battery went dead. Never had power here for 2 1/2 months. Thank God we got a generator after about 3-4 weeks.


Digital TV converter. That happens tomorrow. No more rabbit ears and analog Tv's. Posts earlier on the subject.

Note -- lead acid batteries (car) need to be kept charged or they die. No battery of any kind should ever be let to drain completely.

I gave my inverter and battery and fan to the elderly in Punta Gorda and they used it for two days straight without recharge. It was a 120 amphour deepcycle.
Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8185
Quoting Ossqss:


With 2 small kids, I have to keep them entertained when the power goes out. Especially in a storm. The inverter with the battery, powered their small TV and games for many hours. Keeping their minds off of the other stuff. Mine too.

If you have an inverter, a car battery, a DTV converter and small TV, you can have some creature comforts available to you during the storm. Most never think that they are not going to run the generator outside in high winds and rain, which can last a long time, unless they have a weatherized unit with an auto-transfer switch etc.
What is a DTV converter ? Tried to use a car battery and inverter after Ivan to run a fan to sleep but by the time I started to doze off the battery went dead. Never had power here for 2 1/2 months. Thank God we got a generator after about 3-4 weeks.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1540. Ossqss
Quoting Patrap:
There are Great as well ossgss in all emergencies.

I have to get one of those.


With 2 small kids, I have to keep them entertained when the power goes out. Especially in a storm. The inverter with the battery, powered their small TV and games for many hours. Keeping their minds off of the other stuff. Mine too.

If you have an inverter, a car battery, a DTV converter and small TV, you can have some creature comforts available to you during the storm. Most never think that they are not going to run the generator outside in high winds and rain, which can last a long time, unless they have a weatherized unit with an auto-transfer switch etc.
Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8185
I'd never question Mr. Patrap, any man that puts his money and derriere were his mouth is, are far and few between.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1538. Patrap
Those are Great to have as well ossgss in all emergencies.

I have to get one of those.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 420 Comments: 127536
Quoting WPBHurricane05:


Same here basically (minus the roof). Must be a Palm Springs thing.


It was the same for us in Indian River county. I'm sure it has to do with where the storm entered and left the state. Jeanne and Francis left many many more people on the east coast needing repair making it harder to get to right away whereas Wilma left the east coast probably as a weaker storm/effects leaving fewer here needing repairs making what we have availible much quicker to the response
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1536. Ossqss
Another little ditty I have found very useful is this unit. It is a DC power source, a jump starter, an inflator/deflator,compressor, and removable light (18 hrs). I have used the stuffing out of it and it keeps going. It was $50 at one of the wholesale clubs. AC-Delco brand, but there are many of them out there.

Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8185
1535. Patrap
19 days Post K isnt the measure of any one Man's Life,let alone mine.
But without a doubt,it has opened up New venues for my voice to carry in Preparation and Post Storm needs,..the thing like we do at Portlight.org is a true example of How we all can become involved in Disaster Relief.
I encourage all who can to Help in Volusia County starting tomorrow with the Gutting of the 2 Homes we adopted to rebuild.
This season already has claimed 1500 flooded Homes in Florida.
So by helping Portlight ,either with a Donation or time,is a Fine way to get this seasons effects in ones Home state,..a Head start.

Our work in Holly Hill, Fl will begin on Friday June 12; if you are interested in volunteering please contact John Wilbanks john@portlight.org 843-200-6022.


Portlight.org featured Blog and the Volusia Project
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 420 Comments: 127536
barometer Bob is on.....Link
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
During Frances and Jeanne, I used both radio and portable T.V. Needed that T.V.!!! Our local Channel 5 has a $10 off coupon for a digital portable T.V. on it's website.

Link
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Testing if my new avatar was approved...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Viewing: 1582 - 1532

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

Local Weather

Overcast
73 °F
Overcast