Hurricane season begins today; normal June activity expected

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 1:38 PM GMT on June 01, 2009

Share this Blog
2
+

Hurricane season is upon us, and it's time to take a look at the prevailing conditions and 2-week forecast for tropical cyclone activity in the Atlantic. June is typically the quietest month of the Atlantic hurricane season. On average, we see only one named storm every two years in June. Only one major hurricane has made landfall in June--Category 4 Hurricane Audrey of 1957, which struck the Texas/Louisiana border area on June 27 of that year, killing 550. The highest number of named storms for the month is three, which occurred in 1936 and 1968. In the fourteen years since the current active hurricane period began in 1995, there have been eleven June named storms (if we include last year's Tropical Storm Arthur, which really formed on May 31). Five tropical storms have formed in the first half of June in that 14-year period, giving a historical 36% chance of a first-half-of-June named storm.


Figure 1. Tracks of all June tropical storms and hurricanes, 1851 - 2007.

Sea Surface Temperatures
Sea Surface Temperatures (SSTs) are close to average over the tropical Atlantic between Africa and Central America this year (Figure 2). These temperatures are some of the coolest we've seen since 1995, when the current active hurricane period began. This year's cool SSTs should prevent a repeat of the unforgettable Hurricane Season of 2005, which had the highest SSTs on record in the tropical Atlantic. Note also that SSTs along the Equatorial Pacific off the coast of South America are quite a bit above average, signaling the possible start of an El Niño episode. As I discussed in Friday's post, odds are increasing for a weak El Niño to form in time for hurricane season, and this should cut down on the number and intensity of Atlantic tropical storms and hurricanes this year. However, if an El Niño is developing, it shouldn't start affecting Atlantic hurricane activity until August.

Typically, June storms only form over the Gulf of Mexico, Western Caribbean, and Gulf Stream waters just offshore Florida, where water temperatures are warmest. SSTs are 26 - 28°C in these regions, which is about 0.5°C above average for this time of year. June storms typically form when a cold front moves off the U.S. coast and stalls out, with the old frontal boundary serving as a focal point for development of a tropical disturbance. African tropical waves, which serve as the instigators of about 85% of all major hurricanes, are usually too far south in June to trigger tropical storm formation. Every so often, a tropical wave coming off the coast of Africa moves far enough north to act as a seed for a June tropical storm. This was the case for Arthur of 2008 (which also had major help from the spinning remnants of the Eastern Pacific's Tropical Storm Alma). Another way to get Atlantic June storms is for a disturbed weather area in the Eastern Pacific Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) to push north into the Western Caribbean and spawn a storm there. This was the case for Tropical Storm Alberto of 2006 (which may have also had help from an African wave). SSTs are too cold in June to allow storms to develop between the coast of Africa and the Lesser Antilles Islands--there has only been once such development in the historical record--Ana of 1979, which coincidentally will be the name given to this year's first storm.


Figure 2. Sea Surface Temperature (SST) departure from average for June 1, 2009. SSTs were near average over the tropical Atlantic. Note the large region of above average SSTs along the Equatorial Pacific off the coast of South America, signaling the possible start of an El Niño episode. Image credit: NOAA/NESDIS.

Tropical Cyclone Heat Potential
It's not just the SSTs that are important for hurricanes, it's also the total amount of heat in the ocean to a depth of about 150 meters. Hurricanes stir up water from down deep due to their high winds, so a shallow layer of warm water isn't as beneficial to a hurricane as a deep one. The Tropical Cyclone Heat Potential (TCHP, Figure 3) is a measure of this total heat content. A high TCHP over 80 is very beneficial to rapid intensification. As we can see, the heat energy available in the tropical Atlantic has declined considerably since 2005, when the highest SSTs ever measured in the tropical Atlantic occurred. TCHP this year is similar to last year's levels, which were high enough to support five major hurricanes.


Figure 3. Tropical Cyclone Heat Potential (TCHP) for May 31 2005 (top), May 31 of last year (middle) and May 30 2009 (bottom). TCHP is a measure of the total heat energy available in the ocean. Record high values of TCHP were observed in 2005. TCHP this year is much lower, and similar to last year. Image credit: NOAA/AOML.

Wind shear
Wind shear is usually defined as the difference in wind between 200 mb (roughly 40,000 foot altitude) and 850 mb (roughly 5,000 foot altitude). In most circumstances, wind shear above 20 knots will act to inhibit tropical storm formation. Wind shear below 12 knots is very conducive for tropical storm formation. High wind shear acts to tear a storm apart. The jet stream's band of strong high-altitude winds is the main source of wind shear in June over the Atlantic hurricane breeding grounds, since the jet is very active and located quite far south this time of year.

The jet stream over the past few weeks has been locked into a pattern where a southern branch (the subtropical jet stream) brings high wind shear over the Caribbean, and a northern branch (the polar jet stream) brings high wind shear offshore of New England. This leaves a "hole" of low shear between the two branches off the coast of North Carolina, which is where Tropical Depression One formed. The low shear "hole" has dipped down into the northern Gulf of Mexico a few times. Disturbance 90L, which almost developed into a tropical storm before it came ashore in Mississippi/Alabama on May 23, took advantage of one of these low-shear areas.

The jet stream is forecast to maintain this two-branch pattern over the coming ten days. This means that the waters offshore of the Carolinas are the most likely place for a tropical storm to form during this period, though the northern Gulf of Mexico will at times have shear low enough to allow tropical storm formation. The latest 16-day forecast by the GFS model (Figure 4) predicts that the subtropical jet will weaken and retreat northwards by the middle of June, creating low-shear conditions over the Caribbean. This is a typical occurrence for mid-June, and we need to start watching the Western Caribbean for tropical storm formation by the middle of the month.


Figure 4. Wind shear forecast from the 00Z GMT June 1, 2009 run of the GFS model for June 1 (left panel) and June 17 (right panel). Currently, the polar jet stream is bringing high wind shear to the waters offshore New England, and the subtropical jet is bringing high wind shear to the Caribbean. This leaves the waters off the coast of North Carolina under low shear, making this area the most favored region for tropical storm formation over the next 7 - 10 days. By June 17, the subtropical jet is expected to weaken and move northwards, leaving the Caribbean under low shear, and favoring that region for tropical storm formation. Wind speeds are given in m/s; multiply by two to get a rough conversion to knots. Thus, the red regions of low shear range from 0 - 16 knots.

Dry air and African dust
It's too early to concern ourselves with dry air and dust coming off the coast of Africa, since these dust outbreaks don't make it all the way to the June tropical cyclone breeding grounds in the Western Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico. Developing storms do have to contend with dry air from Canada moving off the U.S. coast; this was a key reason why 2007's Subtropical Storm Andrea never became a tropical storm. Dr. Amato Evan of the University of Wisconsin will issue his dust forecast for the coming hurricane season later this week, and I'll be discussing his forecast in an upcoming post.

Steering currents
The steering current pattern over the past few weeks has been typical for June, with an active jet stream bringing many troughs of low pressure off the East Coast of the U.S. These troughs are frequent enough and strong enough to recurve any tropical storms or hurricanes that might penetrate north of the Caribbean Sea. Steering current patterns are predictable only about 3-5 days in the future, although we can make very general forecasts about the pattern as much as two weeks in advance. At present, it appears that the coming two weeks will maintain the typical June pattern, bringing many troughs of low pressure off the East Coast capable of recurving any June storms that might form. There is no telling what might happen during the peak months of August, September, and October--we might be in for a repeat of the favorable 2006 steering current pattern that recurved every storm out to sea--or the unfavorable 2008 pattern, that steered Ike and Gustav into the Gulf of Mexico.

Summary
Recent history suggests a 36% chance of a named storm occurring in the first half of June. The current conditions in the atmosphere and ocean are near average, so expect about a 1/3 chance of a named storm between now and June 15. The computer models are currently not forecasting development of any tropical storms over the next seven days.

I'll have an update Tuesday afternoon, when I'll discuss the Colorado State University June Atlantic Hurricane season forecast by Dr. Phil Klotzbach and Dr. Bill Gray, which will be issued Tuesday morning.

My next analysis and 2-week outlook for hurricane season is scheduled for June 13.

Jeff Masters

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 644 - 594

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18Blog Index

Quoting EDTEXAN:
Hello. I thought I was going to post a link to a website dedicated to the tracking of tropical systems which potentially threaten Texas, since it's June 1st today. (I was going to do it earlier while Tropical Depression #1 was active but was unable).

The address is www.explosivedeepening.net. Click here to go to the Storm Updates page.


I don't think you are allowed to do that. I also got an email from someone else advertising another site.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Hello. I thought I was going to post a link to a website dedicated to the tracking of tropical systems which potentially threaten Texas, since it's June 1st today. (I was going to do it earlier while Tropical Depression #1 was active but was unable).

The address is www.explosivedeepening.net. Click here to go to the Storm Updates page.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting CatastrophicDL:
Severe, thank you. That was just what I was looking for! I lost my link and the one I googled didn't work either.

CaneWAOI = area of interest. My AOI is now 92L. There is a 1008mb dissipating low just north of 92L. I was wondering if it would affect 92L at all?


I think it would if it gets close enough.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Severe, thank you. That was just what I was looking for! I lost my link and the one I googled didn't work either.

CaneWAOI = area of interest. My AOI is now 92L. There is a 1008mb dissipating low just north of 92L. I was wondering if it would affect 92L at all?
Member Since: September 3, 2007 Posts: 3 Comments: 1519
605. Yes.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting SevereHurricane:


Area Of Interest


Oh. I was thinking it had to be related to SOI, but not MJO or SAL and certainly not the TWO.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting CaneWarning:


If I understood the question I would be happy to help. What is an AOI?


Area Of Interest
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting CatastrophicDL:
Guys I would really appreciate it if someone could help me with the question in 605. Thanks!


http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/PS/TROP/tdpositions.html
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting CatastrophicDL:
Guys I would really appreciate it if someone could help me with the question in 605. Thanks!


If I understood the question I would be happy to help. What is an AOI?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Guys I would really appreciate it if someone could help me with the question in 605. Thanks!
Member Since: September 3, 2007 Posts: 3 Comments: 1519
My understanding is that the pilots on the flight were very experienced.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
ZCZC MIATWOAT ALL
TTAA00 KNHC DDHHMM
TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOK
NWS TPC/NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL
800 PM EDT MON JUN 1 2009

FOR THE NORTH ATLANTIC...CARIBBEAN SEA AND THE GULF OF MEXICO...

1. A NON-TROPICAL AREA OF LOW PRESSURE LOCATED A COUPLE HUNDRED MILES
NORTH-NORTHEAST OF THE AZORES ISLANDS IS PRODUCING WINDS TO NEAR
GALE FORCE. SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOW HAVE
BECOME A LITTLE LESS ORGANIZED DURING THE PAST FEW HOURS. THIS
SYSTEM IS EXPECTED TO MOVE NORTHWARD OVER COOLER WATERS DURING THE
NEXT DAY OR TWO. THERE IS A LOW CHANCE...LESS THAN 30 PERCENT...OF
THIS SYSTEM BECOMING A SUBTROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT 48
HOURS.

ELSEWHERE...TROPICAL CYCLONE FORMATION IS NOT EXPECTED DURING THE
NEXT 48 HOURS.

$$
FORECASTER BROWN
NNNN
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Chicklit:
Hi, if anyone has satellite pictures of the weather conditions when the Air France plane went down at about 9 p.m. last night, please post them. It looks like weather was the culprit that brought the plane down.

I don't have any pictures, but you can use CIMSS and go back 21-24 hours. Link It might give an idea of what was going on in that area.
Member Since: September 3, 2007 Posts: 3 Comments: 1519
I am out for tonight
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting ycd0108:
Kamanislander:
maybe this is old news:
Dang! Thought I was posting a link to BBC regarding the Air France plane
What did they hit in that area?


Who knows?. So far the culprit seems to be severe turbulence but modern jets can take a lot of punishment. Turbulence may well have been the start of it but I would be willing to bet good money that several other things went wrong in rapid succession.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
In the "way back" experience memories...

My first memory of a "Tropical" storm (ex-Hurricane)

was 1955...

On the shore of Lake Huron, in the Thumb of Michigan, Connie:

http://www.wunderground.com/data/dhc_archive_charts/at_1955_charts/at195502.gif

CRS
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
627. XL
Quoting yekim1984:
I have gone thru 3 hurricanes and several tropical storms. When I here people talk about major hurricanes, I never here Camille mentioned. It hit the Mississippi gulf coast in 1969 with reported wind gusts over 200mph and a 30+ foot storm surge. I guess since it didn't hit Miami or New Orleans it doesn't get mentioned much. I brought this up to a forcaster at the National Hurricane Center and he agreed with me. They also did an interview with a woman who was the only survivor of about 45 people at a hurricane party. The building the party was in was leveled, nothing but the foundation was left.


I was actually watching a programme on the History channel this evening and Camille was featured. It was all about the power of the sea and there was a whole segment on hurricanes. It was quite informative.

Thanks in advance to everyone who contributes to the blog. I will be lurking throughout the next 6 months and you will be an invaluable source of information for me.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Hi, if anyone has satellite pictures of the weather conditions when the Air France plane went down at about 9 p.m. last night, please post them. It looks like weather was the culprit that brought the plane down.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
50 past the hour... just flipped on the weather channel... for the lulz.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Hurricane Camille...

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
to all you who gave up on this storm and said nothing going on in the tropics.

HA! :)

This has to be some kind of record for an invest out this far... not just in june, but ever.

really good loop: (takes forever but worth it Link
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
camille was a beast of a storm... 1 for the record books... one of the few landfalling cat 5 storms...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Kamanislander:
maybe this is old news:
Dang! Thought I was posting a link to BBC regarding the Air France plane
What did they hit in that area?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
GOES-12 Atmospheric Imagery

These images are primarily for use in tropical storm monitoring. There are several areas to choose from providing a large-scale view of the Atlantic, down to the Gulf of Mexico. During hurricane season, the hurricanes page provides a variety of GOES atmospheric products to help monitor the active storms.

GOES JavaScript Animations
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Hurricane David...

object width="425" height="344">
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
92 L



Member Since: Posts: Comments:
616. IKE
Quoting yekim1984:
I have gone thru 3 hurricanes and several tropical storms. When I here people talk about major hurricanes, I never here Camille mentioned. It hit the Mississippi gulf coast in 1969 with reported wind gusts over 200mph and a 30+ foot storm surge. I guess since it didn't hit Miami or New Orleans it doesn't get mentioned much. I brought this up to a forcaster at the National Hurricane Center and he agreed with me. They also did an interview with a woman who was the only survivor of about 45 people at a hurricane party. The building the party was in was leveled, nothing but the foundation was left.


I've seen pictures before and after. Incredible.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I have gone thru 3 hurricanes and several tropical storms. When I here people talk about major hurricanes, I never here Camille mentioned. It hit the Mississippi gulf coast in 1969 with reported wind gusts over 200mph and a 30+ foot storm surge. I guess since it didn't hit Miami or New Orleans it doesn't get mentioned much. I brought this up to a forcaster at the National Hurricane Center and he agreed with me. They also did an interview with a woman who was the only survivor of about 45 people at a hurricane party. The building the party was in was leveled, nothing but the foundation was left.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Is there a chance 92L will do a loop and hit a certain condo in south Florida?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
92L SHIPS data:
* ATLANTIC SHIPS INTENSITY FORECAST *
* GOES DATA MISSING, PROXY USED *
* OHC DATA AVAILABLE *
* INVEST AL922009 06/02/09 00 UTC *

TIME (HR) 0 6 12 18 24 36 48 60 72 84 96 108 120
V (KT) NO LAND 35 36 37 38 38 37 36 37 37 36 40 34 30
V (KT) LAND 35 36 37 38 38 37 36 37 37 36 40 34 30
V (KT) LGE mod 35 37 38 39 40 39 39 39 40 42 43 45 48

SHEAR (KT) 14 7 2 4 6 14 21 27 29 23 24 23 16
SHEAR DIR 197 199 172 344 326 329 315 310 300 295 284 266 242
SST (C) 16.0 15.5 15.1 14.9 14.8 14.7 14.6 14.4 13.9 13.6 13.3 13.4 13.6
POT. INT. (KT) 70 69 68 67 66 64 66 68 68 67 64 65 67
ADJ. POT. INT. 65 65 64 63 62 60 63 65 65 63 61 62 64
200 MB T (C) -51.6 -50.9 -51.1 -51.7 -51.7 -52.9 -53.3 -53.8 -53.6 -54.5 -54.5 -54.2 -53.6
TH_E DEV (C) 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1
700-500 MB RH 57 62 61 56 58 56 59 60 61 68 68 62 59
GFS VTEX (KT) 18 17 18 17 16 14 11 11 11 11 19 16 13
850 MB ENV VOR 169 160 161 153 150 138 112 103 91 136 167 172 173
200 MB DIV 25 51 24 34 14 -1 -1 20 20 6 6 -10 12
LAND (KM) 1272 1242 1221 1231 1246 1272 1184 970 686 479 423 365 184
LAT (DEG N) 40.8 41.8 42.8 43.5 44.2 44.7 44.6 44.6 44.8 45.4 46.1 45.9 45.2
LONG(DEG W) 24.2 24.2 24.1 24.3 24.5 24.8 23.7 21.0 17.3 14.1 12.3 11.5 9.0
STM SPEED (KT) 9 10 8 7 5 2 7 11 13 9 5 6 10
HEAT CONTENT 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

FORECAST TRACK FROM BAMM INITIAL HEADING/SPEED (DEG/KT): 35/ 9 CX,CY: 5/ 7
T-12 MAX WIND: 30 PRESSURE OF STEERING LEVEL (MB): 664 (MEAN=624)
GOES IR BRIGHTNESS TEMP. STD DEV. 50-200 KM RAD: 12.3 (MEAN=14.5)
% GOES IR PIXELS WITH T < -20 C 50-200 KM RAD: 30.0 (MEAN=65.0)

INDIVIDUAL CONTRIBUTIONS TO INTENSITY CHANGE
6 12 18 24 36 48 60 72 84 96 108 120
----------------------------------------------------------
SAMPLE MEAN CHANGE 1. 2. 3. 4. 6. 8. 9. 11. 11. 12. 13. 13.
SST POTENTIAL -2. -4. -7. -9. -13. -14. -12. -10. -8. -8. -8. -6.
VERTICAL SHEAR MAG 1. 3. 5. 8. 11. 14. 14. 12. 11. 10. 8. 6.
VERTICAL SHEAR DIR 0. 1. 1. 1. 1. 2. 2. 3. 4. 4. 6. 8.
PERSISTENCE 1. 1. 2. 2. 2. 2. 2. 1. 1. 1. 0. 0.
200/250 MB TEMP. 0. 1. 2. 3. 6. 8. 10. 12. 15. 16. 16. 16.
THETA_E EXCESS -1. -2. -3. -4. -6. -9. -11. -15. -19. -23. -26. -29.
700-500 MB RH 0. 0. 0. 0. 0. -1. -1. -1. -1. -2. -2. -2.
GFS VORTEX TENDENCY 0. 0. -1. -1. -3. -6. -6. -7. -7. -1. -3. -6.
850 MB ENV VORTICITY 1. 2. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 11. 11.
200 MB DIVERGENCE 0. 0. 0. 0. 0. 0. 0. 0. -1. -1. -1. -1.
ZONAL STORM MOTION 0. 0. -1. -1. -2. -3. -4. -4. -5. -6. -7. -8.
STEERING LEVEL PRES 0. 0. 0. 0. 0. -1. -1. -1. -1. -1. -1. -1.
DAYS FROM CLIM. PEAK 0. 0. 0. 0. 0. -1. -1. -1. -1. -1. 0. -1.
GOES PREDICTORS -1. -1. -2. -2. -3. -4. -5. -5. -5. -5. -4. -4.
OCEAN HEAT CONTENT 0. 0. 0. 0. 0. 0. -1. -1. -1. -1. 0. 0.
----------------------------------------------------------
TOTAL CHANGE 1. 2. 3. 3. 2. 1. 2. 2. 1. 5. -1. -5.

** 2009 ATLANTIC RI INDEX AL922009 INVEST 06/02/09 00 UTC **
( 30 KT OR MORE MAX WIND INCREASE IN NEXT 24 HR)

12 HR PERSISTENCE (KT): 5.0 Range:-45.0 to 30.0 Scaled/Wgted Val: 0.7/ 1.4
850-200 MB SHEAR (KT) : 6.6 Range: 26.2 to 3.2 Scaled/Wgted Val: 0.9/ 1.1
D200 (10**7s-1) : 29.6 Range:-21.0 to 140.0 Scaled/Wgted Val: 0.3/ 0.5
POT = MPI-VMAX (KT) : 28.9 Range: 33.5 to 126.5 Scaled/Wgted Val: 0.0/ 0.0
850-700 MB REL HUM (%): 72.0 Range: 56.0 to 85.0 Scaled/Wgted Val: 0.6/ 0.3
% area w/pixels <-30 C: 999.0 Range: 16.0 to 100.0 Scaled/Wgted Val:999.0/999.0
STD DEV OF IR BR TEMP : 999.0 Range: 30.6 to 3.2 Scaled/Wgted Val:999.0/999.0
Heat content (KJ/cm2) : 0.0 Range: 0.0 to 130.0 Scaled/Wgted Val: 0.0/ 0.0

Prob of RI for 25 kt RI threshold= 999% is 999.0 times the sample mean(12.3%)
Prob of RI for 30 kt RI threshold= 999% is 999.0 times the sample mean( 8.0%)
Prob of RI for 35 kt RI threshold= 999% is 999.0 times the sample mean( 4.8%)

Member Since: Posts: Comments:


^ Anyone know what that is
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
609. JRRP
Quoting StSimonsIslandGAGuy:
Cool JRRP--not what I am looking for but very cool nonetheless!

thanks
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
92 not up on the Navy site yet
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
We have now invest 92L.

NHC_ATCF
invest_al922009.invest
FSTDA
R
U
040
010
0000
200906020137
NONE
NOTIFY=ATRP/strong>
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting CatastrophicDL:
Will the low dissipating to the north of our AOI affect development at all? Also Dvoraks were issued earlier on this "invest" but I seem to have a malfunctioning link for NOAA's Dvoraks can someone post one for me? Thanks in advance!

Sorry I want to ask an on-topic question, but can someone help me with this?
Member Since: September 3, 2007 Posts: 3 Comments: 1519
604. JRRP
Link
David 1979
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Hurricane David...yeah...we had a whole lot of that one!






Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Watching this gives me the chills...

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Back to "lurkin", 'till the winds wind up here. For real, I love this crowd!!! Wish it never got so popular. To much BS when you need facts. Pat. keep up the good work!!!!! You are a wealth of info & resources.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Hello everyone!
See we have an invest in the atlantic...
Very interesting.. I guess this will definatley be one for the fish... Anybody have thoughts on how the east coast will be impacted this year(specifically SC northward)?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Patrap:

LARGE Image of David near Georgia



...oops

That image of David is South of Haiti

David was Cat 5 prior to being ripped by mountains of Haiti

I was living in the Exuma cays (Bahama's) in 79 when he came over us it was just a cat 1.

CRS
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
597. IKE
589 and 592...I could tell you some stories...what a ride. Thanks for the kind words.....
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
That was the most work of all. One month later!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Whats the view on the invest, a bit reminiscent of Hurricane Vince but not near as powerful.

http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/goes/flt/t1/loop-ir2.html
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Viewing: 644 - 594

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18Blog Index

Top of Page

About JeffMasters

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.