Space Weather storms

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 4:40 PM GMT on March 31, 2009

Share this Blog
3
+

Twenty years ago this month, on March 13, 1989, I was aboard NOAA's P-3 weather research aircraft, bumping through a turbulent portion of a fierce winter storm in a remote ocean area between Greenland and Norway. We were searching for clues on how to make better weather forecasts for the regions of Norway and the northern British Isles battered by these great storms. Our 2-month project, based in Bødø, Norway, was called the Coordinated Eastern Arctic Research Experiment (CEAREX) . Today's flight took us through the heart of an extratropical storm developing at the edge of the sea ice that covered the ocean waters east of Greenland.

As I looked over at the white-capped, forbidding waters of the Greenland Sea, I reflected today's flight was not particularly dangerous by Hurricane Hunter standards, though the storm's tropical storm-force winds made the ride a bit rough at times. However, we were a long way from civilization. Should an emergency require us to ditch the aircraft in the ocean or the nearby remote island of Jan Mayen, we'd be tough to find unless we were able to radio back our position before going down. Far from any land areas, our communication life-line to the outside world was HF radio (ham radio), which relied on Earth's ionosphere to bounce signals off of. Three hours into the flight this life-line abruptly stopped working.


Figure 1. Sea ice swirls in ocean eddies off the coast of Labrador, Canada, in this photo I took during a 1989 CEAREX flight.

"Jeff, can you come up to the cockpit?" Aircraft Commander Dan Eilers' voice crackled over the intercom. I took a break from monitoring our weather instruments, took off my headset, and stepped forward into the cockpit of the P-3.

"What's up, Dan?" I asked.

"Well, HF radio reception crapped out about twenty minutes ago, and I want to climb to 25,000 feet and see if we can raise Reykjavik Air Traffic Control to report our position. We're flying at low altitude in hazardous conditions over 500 miles from the nearest airport, and it's not good that we're out of communication with the outside world. If we were to go down, search and rescue would have no idea where to look for us."

I agreed to work out an alteration to the flight plan with our scientists, so that we could continue to collect good data on the storm while we climbed higher. The scientists weren't too happy with the plan, since they were paying $20,000 for this flight, and wanted to stay low at 1,500 feet to better investigate the storm's structure. Regardless, we climbed as high as we could and orbited the storm, issuing repeated calls to the outside world over our HF radio. No one answered.

"I've never seen such a major interruption to HF radio!" Commander Eilers said, worriedly. "We can go back down to 1,500 feet and resume the mission, but I want to periodically climb to 25,000 feet and continue trying to establish communications. If we can't raise Air Traffic Control, we should consider aborting the mission".

I agreed to work with the scientists to accommodate this strategy. They argued hotly against a possible cancellation of this mission, which was collecting some unique data on a significant winter storm. So, for the next four hours, we periodically climbed to 25,000 feet, issuing futile calls over our HF radio. Finally, after an uncomfortable eight hours, it was time to go home to our base in Norway. As twilight sank into Arctic darkness, a spectacular auroral display--shimmering curtains of brilliant green light--lit up sky. It began to dawn on us that the loss of our HF radio reception was probably due to an unusual kind of severe weather--a "Space Weather" storm. An extremely intense geomagnetic storm was hitting the polar regions, triggering our brilliant auroral show and interrupting HF radio communications.

The geomagnetic "Superstorm" of March 13, 1989
As it turned out, the geomagnetic storm of March 13, 1989 was one of the most intense such "Space Weather" events in recorded history. The storm developed as a result of a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) from the sun four days previously. The CME event blasted a portion of the Sun's plasma atmosphere into space. When the protons and electrons from the Sun arrived at the Earth, the planet's magnetic field guided the highly energetic particles into the upper atmosphere near the magnetic poles. As a result, the lower levels of the polar ionosphere become very ionized, with severe absorption of HF radio, resulting in my uncomfortable flight over the Greenland Sea with no communications. The geomagnetic storm didn't stop there--the storm's charged particles triggered a strong magnetic impulse that caused a voltage depression in five transmission lines in the Hydro-Quebec power system in Canada. Within 90 seconds, automatic voltage compensation equipment failed, resulting in a generation loss of 9,450 MW. With a load of about 21,350 MW, the system was unable to withstand the generation loss and collapsed. The entire province of Quebec--six million people--was blacked out for approximately nine hours. The geomagnetic storm also triggered the failure of a large step-up transformer at the Salem Nuclear Power Plant in New Jersey, as well as 200 other failures on the North American power system. Auroras were observed as far south as Florida, Texas, and Cuba during this geomagnetic "superstorm".


Figure 2. Red and green colors predominate in this view of the Aurora Australis (Southern Hemisphere aurora) photographed from the Space Shuttle in May 1991 at the peak of the geomagnetic maximum that also brought us the March 13, 1989 geomagnetic "superstorm". The payload bay and tail of the Shuttle can be seen on the left hand side of the picture. Auroras are caused when high-energy electrons pour down from the Earth's magnetosphere and collide with atoms. Red aurora occurs from 200 km to as high as 500 km altitude and is caused by the emission of 6300 Angstrom wavelength light from oxygen atoms. Green aurora occurs from about 100 km to 250 km altitude and is caused by the emission of 5577 Angstrom wavelength light from oxygen atoms. The light is emitted when the atoms return to their original unexcited state. Image credit: NASA.

Solar Maximum is approaching
The sun waxes and wanes in brightness in a well-documented 11-year cycle, when sun spots and their associated Coronal Mass Ejections occur. We just passed through solar minimum--the sun is quiet, with no sun spots. We are headed towards a solar maximum, forecast to occur in 2012. Geomagnetic storms are at their peak during solar maximum, and we'll have to be on the lookout for severe "Space Weather" starting in 2010. I'll talk more about severe "Space Weather" storms in my next post, when I'll discuss the greatest Space Weather storm in recorded history--the famed "Carrington Event" of 1859--and what damages it might wreak were it to happen today. An extraordinary report funded by NASA and issued by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in 2008 says that a repeat of the Carrington Event could result in the most costly natural disaster of all time.

Resources
MetaTech Corporation's animation of the March 13, 1989 geomagnetic "superstorm".
spaceweather.com
NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC)

Jeff Masters

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 176 - 126

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9Blog Index

I have a feeling that the flooding situatuion is going to spreading from the FL panhandle area east targeting the big bend area today with flooding......
Member Since: October 5, 2007 Posts: 20 Comments: 4970
163. Few! We are just outside the red moderate box
and just on the edge of the 45% box. Most of the
last systems have gone to south of us, except
the HUGE one on saturday that flushed us out with
feet of water. So I'm not too worried. We need rain.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting charlottefl:
Just wondered if anyone else has seen where the Bermuda High has been hovering the last month. Very interesting...


Not really that unusual, in that location...Most would not consider this to be the Bermuda High. Don't confuse this with the Azores High which really is the Bermuda High

Member Since: September 2, 2007 Posts: 179 Comments: 20448
Looks like the worm stayed underground. No big issues so far. Link
Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8188
Quoting charlottefl:
Just wondered if anyone else has seen where the Bermuda High has been hovering the last month. Very interesting...


It will certainly shift back down into it's "permanent" slot off the US East Coast by June/July in time for H-Season so we can try to figure out what impact this will have on the US and Caribbean....If we end up with Enso neautral conditions during the peak of H-Season, historical climatoly has suggested that the US East Coast, as opposed to the Gulf Coast, would be at a greater risk of a potential strike where the BH settles down for the Summer will play the typically huge role..
Member Since: August 8, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 9402
Just wondered if anyone else has seen where the Bermuda High has been hovering the last month. Very interesting...
Member Since: December 18, 2006 Posts: 7 Comments: 2687
AussieStorm - Is that Surfmom I see on that wave? Fabulous pictures!
Member Since: July 24, 2007 Posts: 2 Comments: 927
Quoting MNTornado:


I don't put an stock in the hypercane theories, but the super volcano is not a theory. It is a documented fact though they haven't had any eruptions in a long while. I know that there are folks keeping a close eye on Yellowstone now that they know that it is a super volcano (also a very recent discovery).
Last night on "How the Earth was Made" covered the deep well of magma, or "hot spot" under yellowstone. Apparently it erupts about every 600,000 years. It's now 640,000 years since the last eruption. Earthquakes are increasing, doming is occuring, and a ship that sank under Yellowstone Lake many years ago has now risen so that the wreckage is sitting above water. So that magma reservoir is apparently building. All the more reason for us to enjoy today with all the gifts it brings to us. Who knows? Still, much better odds of getting hit by a truck than wiped out by an asteroid. By the way, Good morning everyone. As always, this blog rocks.
Member Since: July 24, 2007 Posts: 2 Comments: 927
Good Morning All....Yup....All folks along the Northern Gulf coastal areas/states need to stay tuned to local news/noaa radio over the next 24 hours.....The biggest problem (outside of the tornado/wind events) will be localized flooding along rivers/streams and flood watches/warnings are also up everywhere...However, the rain is always welcome for the crops and vegetation....
Member Since: August 8, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 9402
Quoting Vortex95:
163. As lol S Fla is never in the mix. It must feel left out :P.
Not really, I'm sure. More like relieved :o)

Have a great day, all! We're starting out overcast here, so just about anything can happen. . . .
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
162. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
Fiji Meteorological Services
Tropical Disturbance Summary
TROPICAL DEPRESSION FOURTEEN-F
18:00 PM FST April 1 2009
=================================

At 06:00 AM UTC, Tropical Depression 14F (1002 hPa) located at 17.0S 178.0E is reported as slowly moving north-northeast. Position POOR based on latest multispectral infrared with animation and peripheral surface reports. Sea surface temperatures is around 29C.

TD 14F is weak at this stage with the low level circulation center exposed, deep convection is detached to the east and drier air located to the south. 14F is embedded in a monsoonal trough while an active convergence zone lies to the north. A strong southeast surge is developing to the south. System lies under moderate amount of shear. Global models are keen to developing a series of lows along the monsoonal trough over the next few days (14F being one of these lows). These lows are likely to move fairly rapidly to the southeast in response to a good northwest steering flow. Strong to gale force winds are expected to develop south of these lows as a strong high pressure system near New Zealand extends a developing ridge of pressure into the tropics. At this stage, there is a low chance for any of these low to reach tropical cyclone status.

POTENTIAL FOR 14F TO DEVELOP INTO A TROPICAL CYCLONE OVER THE NEXT 24 TO 48 HOURS IS LOW.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting StSimonsIslandGAGuy:
Well we did get 1.52" of rain by midnight. So the rain hole was filled! And more is falling, yay, and double yay!


More rain coming it appears.
Member Since: September 2, 2007 Posts: 179 Comments: 20448
Quoting Drakoen:


The thunderstorms today were the result of mesoscale convergence.


I thought it was because of very high clouds...LOL...just kidding...
Member Since: September 2, 2007 Posts: 179 Comments: 20448
GRAPHIC 50
River Flooding Map
Member Since: September 2, 2007 Posts: 179 Comments: 20448
Quoting stillwaiting:



The stationary front looked to be the main cause of the instabilty over most of the central and southern penninsula.IMO,not sea breeze storms,its a bit early still for those!!!maybe the middle of may....


The thunderstorms today were the result of mesoscale convergence.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: September 2, 2007 Posts: 179 Comments: 20448
154. Tejano72 11:35 PM EDT on March 31, 2009

Long time no see......how you been
Member Since: September 2, 2007 Posts: 179 Comments: 20448
Baha: Agreed.

120. Ossgss: There is a terrific book, which puts atstrophysics, including very recent discoveries - of which there have been many (so anything more than about 2 years old is about as dated as a Commodore 64 - astrophysically speaking). The title is "Death from the Skies". Its a catchy title, but reading it, for about $20, is pretty much the equivalent of taking an undergraduate course in astrophysics on the topic of "bad things that could happen" and the science and references are excellent. Australia and Hawaii have cutting edge astrophysics labs, much like FSU has there Hurricane CSI lab [home of Zie Zuper Ensemble - which sounds suspiciously like something a Bond villain would want to steal and secretly run from his hollowed out volcano], simply because that's where there is a great view away from city lights. They've got some noteworthy blogs and graduate research.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I wish that stuff would slide down a little more into west central florida. With the new water restritions they just announced you can only turn on your sprinklers between midnight and 4 am. but our pump to pull the water out of the lake is about thirty years old and we can't leave it on unattended.

Ya know it wouldn't be so bad if the HOAs would allow less lawn and more "florida friendly" planting. Dispite the current drougt our HOA is still sending out violation letters telling homeowners to resod. CRAZY..
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting cchsweatherman:
Throughout the day at the campus, I had been monitoring the weather situation across Florida. The main reason was due to the fact that all the forecast soundings from this morning indicated favorable atmospheric conditions for thunderstorm development. Was really surprised by the several tornado warnings that were issued across the state and into Georgia as I had not anticipated the atmosphere to destabilize as rapidly as it did. Based upon the early reports I received, it seemed to me that the tornadoes that did form produced minimal damage, which is good news.

What we all saw today occuring this afternoon across Florida is the transition that is starting to take affect in weather patterns. With the seabreeze activity, it indicates to me that we are exiting the grasp of the dry, continental airmass that had dominated the state for the past several months, and entering into the push towards our rainy season. It will likely still take several more weeks to get into rainy season, but if the impressive seabreeze thunderstorm action this afternoon was any indication, it seems that the worst of this terrible drought across the state may be over and relief is on the horizon.



The stationary front looked to be the main cause of the instabilty over most of the central and southern penninsula.IMO,not sea breeze storms,its a bit early still for those!!!maybe the middle of may....
Member Since: October 5, 2007 Posts: 20 Comments: 4970
Quoting TampaSpin:
You all need to see the blowed up pic of Redoubt on my Web site......

http://tampaspinsweather.webs.com/volcanoearthquaketsunami.htm
good pic tampa,I am glad there are not any of those were I live.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22643
On the world disaster in 2012 topic:

I don't think a world disaster is likely on the basis of any ONE of the events people have named. However, 2012 would be a very bad year if we got SEVERAL of these events at once: a highly active hurricane season in two or three of the more heavily populated basins; a large solar event that knocks out power grids in numerous major N hemisphere cities; a major volcanic eruption that throws large amounts of ash / gasses into the air and / or triggered serious earthquakes / tsunami.

It would then be a "very bad year". . . . globally speaking. . .
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
You all need to see the blowed up pic of Redoubt on my Web site......

http://tampaspinsweather.webs.com/volcanoearthquaketsunami.htm
Member Since: September 2, 2007 Posts: 179 Comments: 20448
144. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
Fiji Meteorological Services
Tropical Disturbance Summary
TROPICAL DEPRESSION FOURTEEN-F
9:00 AM FST April 1 2009
=================================

At 21:00 PM UTC, Tropical Depression 14F (1001 hPa) located at 17.0S 176.5E is reported as moving north-northeast slowly. Position FAIR based on latest multispectral visible with animation and peripheral surface reports. Sea surface temperatures is around 29C.

Tropical Depression 14F is weak at this stage with the low level circulation center exposed, deep convection is detached to the east and drier air located to the south. 14F is embedded in a monsoonal trough while an active covergence zone lies to the north. A strong southeast surge is developing to the south. System lies under moderate amount of shear. Global models are keen to develop a series of lows along the monsoonal trough over the next few days (with 14F being one of these lows). These lows are likely to move fairly rapidly to the southeast in response to a good northwest steering flow. Strong to Gale Force winds are expected to develop south of these lows as a strong high pressure system near New Zealand extends a developing ridge of pressure into the tropics. At this stage, there is a low chance for any of these lows to reach tropical cyclone status.

POTENTIAL FOR 14F TO DEVELOP INTO A TROPICAL CYCLONE OVER THE NEXT 24 TO 48 HOURS IS LOW.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting surfmom:


The Gulf of Mexico after this past cold front. No comparison to Aussie's waves... but I had a great time : )


I don't see any surfers? 5'ers and nobody on them? I hope they were just tired. :) Wish I could have been there.
Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8188
Quoting StSimonsIslandGAGuy:
Some of the forecast notes are better:

Friday, September 17, 1926 8AM:

The tropical storm that passed near Turks Island Thursday afternoon is apparently central about 23 latitude North and 74 latitude West, and is moving rather rapidly west-northwestward attended by hurricane force winds near its center. This is a very severe storm.

Not too bad for a forecast written 22 hours before it hit Miami.
They seemed to have a fairly good idea this storm was coming, but I don't think they expected it to be QUITE as bad as it turned out to be. IIRC, the storm apparently deepened quite precipitously as it approached and crossed the Gulf Stream.

Interesting stuff.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting CybrTeddy:


Yep, some snowfall in the North.
LOL- yes, and the attack of the abominable mayan snow man.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22643
Quoting hydrus:
If the Universe has been in existence for 14.3 billion years(give or take a few years)I wonder how long it will be here from this point on.Whatever has been preconceived to happen on 12/21/12 I am sure there will humans here to record its effect on the good earth.


Yep, some snowfall in the North.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:


The Gulf of Mexico after this past cold front. No comparison to Aussie's waves... but I had a great time : )
Member Since: July 18, 2007 Posts: 30 Comments: 26536
i knew you would like those pics surfmom!!!!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Aussiestorm --Oh my gosh -- Oh my goodness -- those waves are soooooo beautiful --- way out of my league -- but I can still appreciate what they are -- divine -- totally divine.
Member Since: July 18, 2007 Posts: 30 Comments: 26536
Quoting Tazmanian:
did you all here about the Play Station 2


Yeah...dropped them to $99!!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
There is more to propagation than CMEs and the aurora.

Sporadic Ecan be caused by the ionized trails left by meteors as they burn up. Sporadic E is useful as low as 10 meters or just above Citizens Band frequencies. From 2 meters and up Sporadic E and tropo-ducting are two common modes of propagation beyond line of sight. There are more as this map shows.

I am set up to communicate on 2 meters across a 200 mile distance during the summer using tropo-ducting. This occurs when different layers of air create a kind of waveguide that keeps normally line of sight radio waves hugging the curvature of the earth.

Every Ham knows that HF propagation changes at night for the better. There are seasonal changes too, when for instance 160 meters gets hot. Hams have mapped out the portion of the atmosphere above the troposphere so that they know when and where to point their antennas to reach around the globe.

Here is a weather station you probably haven't seen. Solar Wind
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
did you all here about the Play Station 2
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Hope the rain continues...but don't need the severe weather..
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Dr. Masters has a particular skill for writing in this science adventure frame when talking about his past field meteorologist roles.

His essay reminds of a a book I once read as a child called "There's Adventure in Meteorology"

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Beaches shut as rain causes chaos

Article from: The Daily Telegraph


By Lauren Williams and agencies

April 01, 2009 10:55am

THOUSANDS of homes have been blacked out, beaches are closed, there's traffic chaos on wet roads, flash flooding in city suburbs, more than 80 Sydney people requesting emergency help, reports of trees down and northern NSW remains very wet as heavy rain continues to fall in NSW.
Waves up to five metres high are hammering the coast of Sydney and surrounding areas, while heavy rain has brought down trees and damaged homes.

Dangerous surf forced the closure of all Sydney beaches today, except for Bondi, with destructive waves expected to continue until tomorrow. Strong winds have also brought down trees in Sydney's suburbs.

Power outages in Glebe, Chippendale and Camperdown blacked out more than 3000 homes and businesses this morning while more than 1000 people have become victims of the flooding sweeping the mid-north coast of NSW.

.An EnergyAustralia spokesman said the homes and businesses lost power for about 90 minutes as families woke to prepare for work and school after an electrical fault being blamed on the rain. Almost 85mm of rain has fallen over the Sydney basin in the past 24 hours.

As thousands of commuters faced road nightmares trying to get to work today, the Weather Bureau reported Turramurra had the highest rainfall in Sydney overnight with 77mm falling in since 9am yesterday. Up to 55m of rain fell in the Royal National Park just south of Sydney, and parts of Cronulla received 46mm.

Dramatic falls right across the NSW mid-north coast peaked at Girralong, where 538 mm was recorded in the last 24 hours. Bellingen received nearly 400mm, while the Dorrigo area recorded 266mm.

Dorrigo had falls of 270 mm since 9am yesterday while Coff Harbour registered 450mm. The Bellinger River peaked at 8.6 metres last night, stranding about 1600 nearby residents.

The Bellinger River has begun to fall from its peak, which was equal to 1986 levels, but residents in Bellingen, Darkwood, Thora and Kalang will remain isolated for up to four days.

On the far North Coast, 170mm of rain fell over Ballina, while Alstonville had 129mm.

Further south Yamba recorded 146mm in the 24 hours to 7am and Evans Head received 133mm.

In Sydney, flooding caused traffic delays at Victoria Rd, approaching The Crescent, in Rozelle, near the Anzac Bridge while traffic lights are blacked out and emergency crews are responding to multiple calls for fallen power lines.

The State Emergency Service (SES) has responded to 80 calls for assistance in Sydney since yesterday afternoon, with up to 150 volunteers in action.

"Most are from the city's northern suburbs and most of those have been for leaky roofs and branches down," SES spokesman Dave Webber said.

The Roads and Traffic Authority (RTA) has also reported slow traffic around Sydney due to flooding on roads in Collaroy and Artarmon in the north and Alexandria in the inner south.

The NSW Bureau of Meteorology has issued a severe weather warning across the state, with fears continued heavy rainfall across the Hunter, Sydney Metropolitan and parts of the Mid North Coast districts expected to cause more flash flooding.

Damaging surf conditions and waves of more than five metres has also led to the bureau predicting significant beach erosion on the mid-north Coast, Hunter and Sydney coasts between Smoky Cape and Port Hacking today.

Gale warnings have been issued along the mid north coast today, with winds averaging over 60 km/h at times and gusts exceed 90 km/hr.

Related coverage: NSW floods strand thousands of people

Gallery: How the big wet has caused chaos in NSW

Sydney blackout furore: Nathan Rees orders emergency review

Flood waters have eased across the state, but hundreds of people evacuated across the state's mid-north coast remain stranded.

The Pacific Highway through Coffs Harbour was opened in both directions early this morning after being closed overnight, but remains closed north of Urunga.

An Emergency Operations Centre has been established at a resort in Coffs Harbour containing personnel from the Police, SES, local council and Country Energy.

Dorrigo, Bellingen and Coffs Harbour Hospitals have all been isolated by the flood waters but they have not been evacuated.

Evacuation centres established at the Coffs Harbour RSL in Vernon Street and the Bonville Golf Club in North Bonville Road have allowed people to leave overnight but remain open for people to attend.

Sixty people who took refuge at the Coffs Ex-services Club overnight are still stranded.

Coffs Creek peaked at 5.14m at 6:15pm yesterday, which is just below the 1996 level of 5.43m, when floods resulted in the death of one person.

About 100 Coffs Harbour residential properties and businesses have been affected, with 420 people evacuated from surrounding areas, including 300 school children and aged care residents.

At the Coffs ex-services club duty Manager, Paul Cunningham said around 40 people were still sheltering at the club this morning.

"It's all been pretty positive, but people are pretty distressed," he said.

"They don't know what's happened to their houses, their belongings,"

Mr Cunningham said while rain had eased overnight, the community were bracing themselves for another 80 milimetres today.

"The way Coff is designed, it just continues to flood," he said.

Parents have been allowed to pick up their children from The Bishop Druitt College in North Boambee Road and the Christian Community School in Curacoa Street at Coffs Harbour after they were cut-off and isolated by the flood waters with a large number of students still at the schools.

Newrey Island is flooded. 60 homes were evacuated; however, no further people have been evacuated due to the area being unsafe for SES and RFS emergency vehicles and staff.

People who haven't been evacuated are safe.

Water levels around Urunga are steady. Ninety people were evacuated to the Urunga Golf Club.

There were similar water levels at Bellingen Keys where 80 homes were evacuated.

The evacuation centre at Urunga Golf Club has about 250 displaced people with the Department of Community Services in attendance.

A public information inquiry centre has been opened to take calls from members of the public about the flood affected areas on the North Coast.

Police and SES are urging all residents to remain in their homes at this stage and to continually monitor the situation.

Families are told to be prepared to evacuate if necessary and allow plenty of time to do so.

Members of the public are informed that they can contact the information inquiry centre on 1800 227 228.

The community is also advised to pack only what is necessary, think about where they will go and to listen to updates through the media.

The police have advised motorists not to attempt to drive through flood waters due to hidden dangers and debris while residents are told not to swim in swollen rivers and creeks.

Members of the community are also advised they can contact the SES on 132 500 for emergency flood and storm assistance.

For all other emergencies, the public are advised to contact Triple 000.

NSW Emergency Services Minister Steve Whan is on his way to the area to determine if disaster relief is necessary.

"I'm travelling to Coffs Harbour this morning just to see what the damage is and see whether or not a natural disaster declaration is needed for the area," Mr Whan told Macquarie Radio today.

The SES has responded to more than 760 requests for assistance and performed about 60 rescues of people trapped in flood waters.

The SES estimates some rural properties could remain cut off for the next four days.

"But again a lot of these areas are used to these flooding situations and are quite well prepared," spokesman David Webber said.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
This is what Cyclone Jasper gave to surfers of SE Qld/northern NSW last week












Cheers AussieStorm
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Drakoen:
Severe Weather in the Southeast:


Actually quite impressive. Didn't figure the weather situation across Florida would have been this active this afternoon. Knew that based upon the forecast soundings that thunderstorms would develop around the state, but didn't expect them to become severe since the soundings didn't indicate such would occur this morning. Guess I forgot what happens when you add bigtime daytime heating into the equation since its been such a long time since we've seen seabreeze thunderstorms pop statewide.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting GeoffreyWPB:
Anyone hear about the wicked weather here in So. Fla.? :) So is this trend of sea breeze storms on the east coast supposed to continue?


it looks more wicked in north Florida
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Viewing: 176 - 126

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

Local Weather

Mostly Cloudy
38 °F
Mostly Cloudy

JeffMasters's Recent Photos

Lake Effort Snow Shower Over Windsor, Ontario
Sunset on Dunham Lake
Pictured Rocks Sunset
Sunset on Lake Huron