Weather and mortality

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:21 PM GMT on February 27, 2009

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Hurricanes, earthquakes, and tornadoes get the attention-grabbing headlines when a natural disaster kills people in the U.S. Yet heat waves, cold winter weather, severe thunderstorm winds, and flooding all killed more people in the U.S. between 1970 and 2004, according to a December 2008 article published by Kevin Borden and Susan Cutter of the University of South Carolina. Tornadoes and lightning were tied for fifth place, and Hurricanes and earthquakes tied for eighth place. However, had this study extended one more year into 2005, the roughly 1800 hurricane deaths from Hurricane Katrina would have vaulted hurricane deaths into third place, behind heat wave deaths and cold weather deaths. The study also showed that people living in rural areas were most likely to die from a natural disaster than those living in cities.


Figure 1. U.S. deaths due to natural hazards between 1970 and 2004 showed that weather associated with extremes of hot and cold weather, along with severe thunderstorm winds (the "Severe Weather" category), killed the most people. Image credit: Spatial patterns of natural hazards mortality in the United States, International Journal of Health Geographics. Authors: Kevin Borden and Susan Cutter of the University of South Carolina.

The authors used Spatial Hazard Event and Loss Database for the United States (SHELDUS)(available at http://www.sheldus.org). This database provides hazard loss information (economic losses and casualties) from 1960-2005 for eighteen different hazard types, and is primarily based on data from the NOAA/National Climatic Data Center publication, "Storm Data". The numbers have high uncertainty, and the authors conclude, "There is considerable debate about which natural hazard is the most "deadly". According to our results, the answer is heat. But this finding could be changed depending on the data source, or how hazards within a data source are grouped."


Figure 2. U.S. deaths due to natural hazards for the 10- and 30-year period ending in 2007, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Image credit: NOAA.

To illustrate, a 2008 study by Thacker et al. called, "Overview of deaths associated with natural events, United States, 1979-2004", concluded that cold deaths were twice as common as heat deaths in the U.S. However, they noted that the 1995 Chicago heat wave, which killed between 600 and 700 people by some estimates, was not properly represented in the data base used in their study. This data base attributed only 50 deaths in the entire state of Illinois to heat in 1995. The authors conclude that their data base "under-reports the actual number of deaths due to severe heat".

Another example: NOAA plots up annual natural hazard deaths from the same source ("Storm Data") as the first study I montioned. Their statistics for the ten-year period ending in 2007 show a much different picture (Figure 2). Heat deaths are a much more dominant source of mortality than cold and winter storm deaths, by a factor 3.5. The take-home message from all this is that heat- and cold-related extreme weather are probably the deadliest weather hazards in the U.S., but we really don't know the proportion of people killed by each. One can easily cherry pick the study of one's choice to show a desired result.

How global warming might affect heat and cold-related deaths
If the globe continues to warm up this century, as predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), heat-related deaths will increase and cold-related deaths will decrease (duh!). Unfortunately, that's about the most intelligent thing one can say about the matter. The 2007 IPCC report (section 8.4.1.3, Heat- and cold-related mortality), does not attempt to estimate the numbers, saying, "Additional research is needed to understand how the balance of heat-related and cold-related mortality could change under different socio-economic scenarios and climate projections."

This high uncertainty in future heat- and cold-related deaths does not stop advocates on either side of the global warming issue from cherry picking results from selected studies to support a particular point of view. For example, opinion columnist George Will stated in a recent Newsweek column: "In Europe, cold kills more than seven times as many as heat does. Worldwide, moderate warming will, on balance, save more lives than it will cost--by a 9-to-1 ratio in China and India. So, if substantially cutting carbon dioxide reverses warming, that will mean a large net loss of life globally." Will bases his arguments on Danish statistician Bjørn Lomborg's controversial 2007 book, "Cool It: The Skeptical Environmentalist's Guide to Global Warming." However, as pointed out by Danish biologist Kåre Fog, who has assembled a large web site dedicated to pointing out the errors in Lomborg's books, the huge number of excess deaths attributed to cold by Will and Lomborg are in large part because the death rate naturally rises in the winter: "Old and seriously sick people have less vitality in the dark season. It is too bold to say that the excess deaths during the dark part of the year are `deaths due to excess cold?. There is no evidence that a warmer climate will alter the seasonal variation. These people would soon die in any case, even if winters became warmer. Indeed, cold and warm climates, like Finland and Greece, have approximately the same seasonal variation in mortality." The IPCC underscores this problem, stating: "projections of cold-related deaths, and the potential for decreasing their numbers due to warmer winters, can be overestimated unless they take into account the effects of influenza and season".

Heat wave deaths are subject to a degree of uncertainty as well. It is somewhat of a subjective call if an elderly person who dies during a heat wave died primarily as a result of the heat, or of a pre-existing heart or respiratory condition. Complicating the diagnosis is the fact that air pollution is at its worst during heat waves, and can also be blamed as the cause of death in some cases. Different studies will use different criteria for classify deaths due to heat, pollution, or pre-existing medical conditions during a heat wave, leading to widely varying estimates of mortality. For example, the European heat wave of 2003 is blamed for 35,000, 52,000, or 70,000 deaths, depending upon the source. You're more likely to hear the higher 70,000 figure quoted by advocates of doing something about global warming, and the 35,000 figure quoted by those opposed.

The three 2008 studies for the U.S. show the ratio of cold deaths to heat deaths ranges from 2:1 to 1:3, which is very different from the 7:1 and 9:1 figures quoted by Will and Lomborg for Europe, India, and China. I don't trust any of these numbers, since heat and cold mortality statistics are highly uncertain and easy to cherry pick to show a desired result. It is rather unproductive to argue about how many people die due to heat and cold in the current climate or in a future climate. Excess heat deaths due to climate change should not get as much attention as the potential for death due to reduction in crop yields due to increased heat and drought, regional collapses of the oceanic food chain from the steady acidification of the oceans, and the wars these conditions might trigger.

For more information
For those interested, Kåre Fog also presents a list of the errors in Al Gore's book and movie, An Inconvenient Truth, and has a Comparison of error counts between Al Gore and Bjørn Lomborg. Lomborg has assembled a Short reply to Skeptical Questions to respond to some of Fog's criticisms, but does not answer Fog's criticism on cold deaths vs. heat deaths. Suffice to say, one should be wary of trusting climate change information from either source, or from opinion columnists, or from politicians. Blogs can also be a questionable source of climate change information, though I think wunderground Climate Change blogger Dr. Ricky Rood is one of the most knowledgeable and unbiased climate change experts in the world. Though imperfect, the best source of climate change information is the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The level of scientific collaboration and peer review that went into that document is one of the most remarkable achievements in the history of science, and the IPCC was fully deserving of the Nobel Prize awarded to it last year. Blogs and books like Lomborg's and Gore's have not gone through peer-review by scientific experts on climate change, and will have far more errors, biases, and distortions of the truth than the IPCC reports.

Jeff Masters

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The sad fact about the boating incident,..is that one click of a NOAA radio,..the Boaters would have known a Marine Warning was in Effect as the front approached.

Sadly,..they didnt check the weather or ignored the warnings.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 414 Comments: 125592
"If the globe continues to warm up this century, as predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), heat-related deaths will increase and cold-related deaths will decrease (duh!). Unfortunately, that's about the most intelligent thing one can say about the matter."

I found this statement somewhat annoying. While yes, the average temperature will rise due to "global warming", one of the side effects will be a wider spread in the extremes, as well as more and more intense storms. These more intense storms will include ice related events, with higher snow falls and lower temperatures.

So, we'll see how things go. But the simplicity implicit in "cold-related deaths will go down, heat-related deaths will go up" is quite annoying.
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So sad about the players.
I grew up on the water and understand how dangerous boating can be.
Surprised they would go out that far in such a small craft!
I'm afraid they're is little or no hope for them at this point.
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Hurricane Center developing Web tool to predict risk to homes

By Curtis Krueger, Times Staff Writer: Link
Tuesday, March 3, 2009

ST. PETERSBURG — When hurricanes hit, it's often the water that kills.

So the National Hurricane Center is making it easier for people to learn if a hurricane is likely to cause seawater to surge into their homes. They soon will be able to find out at the Web site www.hurricanes.gov.

"If you have a Category 3 coming in, you can figure out, 'Am I at risk?' " said the center's director, Bill Read, who is in St. Petersburg to for a federal hurricane conference.

For example, if your house is at 10 feet above sea level, you'd probably want to evacuate from an incoming storm that threatens to raise seas 15 feet above sea level. On the other hand, if your house sits at 20 feet above sea level, you might decide to stay put during that storm, depending on local recommendations.

In a worst-case storm in the Tampa Bay area, swelling, unstoppable seas could rise more than 20 feet above low-lying parts of St. Petersburg, Tampa or Oldsmar.
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Complete Blog Refresh
Mirror Site



Current Home weather station data.
Member Since: October 1, 2007 Posts: 81 Comments: 26493
Quoting surfmom:
Morning -- how can it be 43 degrees to greet me?? Colder this morning then last -- North winds AT 15 mph -- you have to be a polar bear to surf in this.....


Imagine and pray for the 3 missing boaters still in the GOM,which is about 65 degrees,the one thing 2 of them have going for them is they are football players and they should have increased stamina, but over 60hrs in that kind of water our prayer w/be the only thing that keeps them alive and we have the worlds best search and rescue the coast guard on the job,the boat was found about 30 miles west of johns pass up in st pete,but they said the wind and current would push them south and east towarrds OUR shoreline....although 30 miles out to start with is long way from the coast if you've ever been that far out you know what I'm talkming about...
Member Since: October 5, 2007 Posts: 20 Comments: 4970
While technically not tropical weather, it is international geography.

Check out International Hangman.
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I just did a quick scan of low temps at Nassau since Nov. 2008, and for this winter season we've had 11 days where the temperature dipped below 60 degrees. The coldest was 53 on Jan. 23. This has been a relatively cold winter for us, with low temps often falling below the 64 degree average.

Someone was asking about low temps in Cuba, and I'm sure some similar data can quickly be gleaned from their weather website.
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Quoting surfmom:
Morning -- how can it be 43 degrees to greet me?? Colder this morning then last -- North winds AT 15 mph -- you have to be a polar bear to surf in this.....
Morning, surf. It was 59 here when I got up this morning, which is why I haven't left for work yet LOL. Don't want to have to get out my hat with the ear-flaps and my gloves . . . lol

I agree it's too cold to surf at 43 degrees. Brrr.
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Quoting natrwalkn:
For those of you that want to move to Cuba.. Hot, humid, and sticky all the time? REALLY?? Isn't a nice cold blast once in a while refreshing?
Hey, for some of us, hot, humid sticky all the time is actually normal weather. We wouldn't know what to do with ourselves if we had to deal with any more of a cold blast than we're already getting!

lol
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Quoting Ossqss:


Unfortunately, we have not hit bottom. 5k and 500 is not out of the question.
I heard someone say a couple of months ago (before Christmas, actually) that based on what they were seeing they didn't expect the market to bottom out until it got down to around 5000. At the time I was skeptical; now, it actually seems possible. That's slashing the market value by 1/2 in a little over 6 months.
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Morning -- how can it be 43 degrees to greet me?? Colder this morning then last -- North winds AT 15 mph -- you have to be a polar bear to surf in this.....
Member Since: July 18, 2007 Posts: 30 Comments: 26536
OMG!! Bug season is coming!
Member Since: August 14, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 67
It's a nice, crisp, 25 in Wilm, NC right now. I dread the humid days with skeeters eating you alive as soon ad you step out the door!
Member Since: August 14, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 67
Y'all must be Yankees and grew up with cold.
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Quoting KoritheMan:


No. >_>


To each his own, I suppose. I'd like to go further north, myself. Wilm, NC is too hot and humid for me and I'd like more snow and cold in winter. I just can't imagine living in a sauna all the time with no relief!
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Quoting natrwalkn:
For those of you that want to move to Cuba.. Hot, humid, and sticky all the time? REALLY?? Isn't a nice cold blast once in a while refreshing?


No. >_>
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Anyone here familiar with climatic determinism?
Member Since: August 14, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 67
For those of you that want to move to Cuba.. Hot, humid, and sticky all the time? REALLY?? Isn't a nice cold blast once in a while refreshing?
Member Since: August 14, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 67
601. Skyepony (Mod)
vort~ The article had put it that coal had lobbied hard to switch it back to coal even though it had been reworked to burn either of the three.

Oss~ I too hope this situation we are in now brings priorities & realities in line.
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Quoting KoritheMan:
598.

Amazing. I didn't realize that area got flooded so badly from Ike. The video said it was the worst in its history. I'm surprised it surpassed Andrew.


Andrew moved quick and was rather compact.
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598.

Amazing. I didn't realize that area got flooded so badly from Ike. The video said it was the worst in its history. I'm surprised it surpassed Andrew.
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560. atmoaggie "...the average memory for a NY Times reader only goes back to their last visit to the store with food stamps."

How many Aggies does it take to eat an armadillo? Three. One eats while the other two watch for cars.

How many Aggies does it take to launch a boat?
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Quoting JRRP:
??

Link


WOW I see that!
Maybe it will become Subtropical before the front reaches it??? Its drifting to the SW...
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CUL8R ª¿ª
Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8183
I believe you will find they are meteor's. They went directly over the storm, which looks to be fairly tall in the distance. From what we just discussed, they would have to be flying much higher that capabilities would allow. Typically, jets don't leave a visible light trail behind them, even in timelaspe at night. Just my take.
Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8183
Commercial Jets at altitude leaving Vapor trails..are hardly UFO's,..LOL



Green gone Bad here.

Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 414 Comments: 125592
Awsome vid. I think I saw UFO's in there too.
Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8183
WOW, 75,000 ft. ª¿ª
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Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 414 Comments: 125592
Q: How tall can a thunderstorm get?

A: Thunderstorms, which are clouds that grow vertically in the atmosphere, have been measured as high as about 70,000 feet. But most top out between 30,000 and 50,000 feet. The tropics consistently have the tallest thunderstorms, though periodic severe and tornadic thunderstorms outside the tropics usually are intense enough to grow taller than 50,000 feet.

WGN Weather Center Blog


Highest thunderstorm tops

Dear Tom,
You are always telling us how high the thunderstorm tops are. What is the
highest top ever recorded in the Chicago area and in the world?
Bill Matthews, Schaumburg


Dear Bill,
As a general rule of thumb, the higher the thunderstorm top the more severe
the thunderstorm is likely to be. Storms with the highest tops tend to form
in areas of greatest lift where the atmosphere is most volatile.
In the
Chicago area, garden-variety summer thunderstorms develop to heights between
35,000-45,000 feet, but the tops of severe thunderstorms here can approach
60,000 feet and in extreme cases 70,000 feet. The top of the thunderstorm
that produced the Plainfield tornado on Aug. 28, 1990, towered to 65,000
feet.

The tallest thunderstorms on Earth have been documented in the tropics
where tops have been measured to about 75,000 feet, building more than 14
miles up into the atmosphere.


Posted by wgnweather on July 25, 2008 10:41 PM | Permalink
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 414 Comments: 125592
Quoting Patrap:




NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite reveals a remarkable feature in this 3-D cat scan of Hurricane Rita - a pair of gigantic chimney clouds reaching more than 11 miles high. That is equivalent to 60,000 feet, or twice as high as a commercial airplane's cruising altitude. TRMM observed these hot towers in Hurricane Rita on September 19, 2005 during a period of brief intensification. Credit: NASA/JAXA

NASA page with animations Link




I once read that a thunderstorm near orlando reached 70,000 Ft. I still dont think that is possible is it?
Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8183




NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite reveals a remarkable feature in this 3-D cat scan of Hurricane Rita - a pair of gigantic chimney clouds reaching more than 11 miles high. That is equivalent to 60,000 feet, or twice as high as a commercial airplane's cruising altitude. TRMM observed these hot towers in Hurricane Rita on September 19, 2005 during a period of brief intensification. Credit: NASA/JAXA

NASA page with animations Link




Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 414 Comments: 125592
It can run on gas or oil but people have fought had for it to run on coal, so it does.


It still runs on coal because that is how it was originally designed Skye.

Quoting Skyepony:
There is pictures of hordrs of people & I am tempted to post sign after sign. Thought a demenstrator that brought a backhoe deserved showing was all. Protesting doesn't really do it justice I guess. Coal is sickening people with it's air pollution. The EPA recently linked it with cancers. China has said it is causing the big rise in birth defects there. It is about the dirtiest~ right under ethenol from corn (ethenol from switchgrass is most productive & cleanest of the biofuels~ way better than oil or gas even, but big AG don't want you to know that). With clean renewable fuels available (it's not an urban myth Germany & Australia are having great luck with it) & other less polluting resources, even oil~ there is no reason to be causing billions in health costs, making people sick & dead to power homes. With clean coal, all of Appalachian could look like this one day. (this one is right next to an elementary school & was protesting how BoA is in on it too)



So tell me, what do we do with the trillions of dollars in capital investments that make life easier for everyone. Like, electricity and all of the fancy health care equipment and medicines? Let alone all of the people monitarily bolted on to those gov and business initiatives. Things will not change for years and I certainly dont oppose exploration of new and better ways for just about anything. But reality is what it is. Perhaps the new economic emergency will get peoples priorities in line with reality. Most of the big dollar liberals will be impacted by the policies our new admin has pushed out, just like the rest of us. When their monies get low, they will stop funding the freeloading activists who are probably still sucking the money from ma and pa while in their 40's. Don't get me wrong. I want the best for this country, but that is not going to come from the minority interests driven by virtue of being brainwashing by those who you trust, who lie. Just look at most of the kids in this country sitting behind joysticks or keyboards their whole life. Don't keep score for it may hurt someones feelings if they lose. That is not how nature made us and that is not how America made us. Time will tell the whole story very clearly. Ok, sorry for expressing my view, but I am tired of the misslead doing the leading in this country.

I now step down from the soapbox.

And now on to the Accuweather weather.
Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8183
Quoting CybrTeddy:


Wilma won that record.


I can still remember waking up in the middle of the night to see what wilma was doing and when I saw she was at 882mb and 185mph i was like wtf lol.
Member Since: August 12, 2007 Posts: 2 Comments: 2838
Quoting Ossqss:
Patrap, was it Wilma that intensified the fastest or was it Gilbert or Mitch? i recall 50 mb in a 12 hour period, but cannot remember which it was.


Wilma won that record.
Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 23012
581. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
Tropical Cyclone Warning Center Perth
Tropical Cyclone Technical Bulletin
TROPICAL CYCLONE GABRIELLE, CAT 1 (10U)
9:50 AM WDT March 3 2009
==============================

At 9:00 AM WDT, Tropical Cyclone Gabrielle, Category One [998 hPa] located at 13.5S 107.7E has 10 minute sustained winds of 35 knots with gusts of 50 knots. The cyclone is reported as moving east at 5 knots.

Gale Warning
==============

Gale Force Winds within...
30 nautical miles in NE quadrant
80 nautical miles in SE quadrant
80 nautical miles in SW quadrant
80 nautical miles in NW quadrant

with rough to very rough seas and moderate swell.

Forecast and Intensity
=======================
12 HRS: 14.0S 108.1E - 35 knots (CAT 1)
24 HRS: 14.4S 106.6E - 30 knots (TROPICAL LOW)
48 HRS: 16.0S 101.5E - 25 knots (TROPICAL LOW)

Additional Information
=====================
Pulsing deep convection in southern quadrants remains removed from exposed LLCC by around 60 nm. TPW morphed animation shows an incursion of drier air into western and northern sectors of the TC which combined with persistent NE vertical wind shear has prevented intensification overnight. The well-defined LLCC continued to move towards the east during past 6 hours under influence of low-level westerly flow to its north, however, a strengthening ridge to the south is expected to cause recurvature towards the southwest within the next 12 hours.

Dvorak analysis shows weakening over the past 24 hours, with DT=2.0 based on shear pattern. FT=2.0 but CI maintained at 2.5/3.0. Further weakening is forecast to below TC intensity within the next 24 hours due to low oceanic heat content and the incursion of dry air, however, a temporary intensification may be possible tonight as the system is forecast to move under the upper ridge axis
with decreasing vertical wind shear.
Member Since: May 24, 2006 Posts: 48 Comments: 43666
First FEMA housing site to open on Bolivar Peninsula

Jennifer Heathcock: Link

IMAGES:Link

It's been nearly 6 months since hurricane Ike's wind and surge caused destruction across the Gulf Coast.

Now a FEMA Manufactured Housing Site is getting ready to open on the Bolivar Peninsula.

The High Island School District played a key role in bringing the site to the community.

That's the sound of workers finishing up construction at the FEMA Manufactured Home Site on the Bolivar Peninsula.

"Lots of paperwork and that's it's why 6 months out of the storm," says Paula Quick, the Superintendent of High Island ISD.

In addition to the usual red tape, the location of the site was a factor in how long it's taking to open and get families settled in the 51 homes.





Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 414 Comments: 125592
Speaking of hot towers, it was interesting to view storms on NOAA's land based radar last season. The main thing that struck me was that the echo tops were mainly at about 21,000 feet give or take. Garden variety summer thunderstorms around Houston can top out at over 40,000 feet. There would be echo tops in the tropical storms at 35-45,000 feet, but they would not last long, similar to Houston's thunderstorms. I suppose those were the fabled hot towers.
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Ike boil water notice lifted for Bolivar Peninsula

© 2009 The Associated Press
March 2, 2009, 10:44AM

BEACH, Texas — A boil water advisory in effect since shortly after Hurricane Ike hit Bolivar Peninsula has been lifted as rebuilt supply lines return service to normal.

A statement from the Bolivar Peninsula Special Utility District says customers are no longer required to boil water prior to consumption.

Samples tested by the Galveston Health District found no harmful bacteria in the water supply.

Utility general manager Jennifer McKnight said Monday that state officials did not want the boil water order lifted until all lines were back in service, or disconnected.

McKnight told The Associated Press that the utility currently has about 1,800 customers, compared to 6,200 connections prior to Ike.

Water supply lines had to be rebuilt throughout Bolivar Peninsula, parts of which were swamped when Ike made landfall Sept. 13. The boil water order had been in effect since Sept. 15.

The Bolivar Peninsula Special Utility District, serving High Island, Gilchrist, Caplen, Crystal Beach and Port Bolivar, lifted the boil water notice Saturday.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 414 Comments: 125592
577. Skyepony (Mod)
There is pictures of hordrs of people & I am tempted to post sign after sign. Thought a demenstrator that brought a backhoe deserved showing was all. Protesting doesn't really do it justice I guess. Coal is sickening people with it's air pollution. The EPA recently linked it with cancers. China has said it is causing the big rise in birth defects there. It is about the dirtiest~ right under ethenol from corn (ethenol from switchgrass is most productive & cleanest of the biofuels~ way better than oil or gas even, but big AG don't want you to know that). With clean renewable fuels available (it's not an urban myth Germany & Australia are having great luck with it) & other less polluting resources, even oil~ there is no reason to be causing billions in health costs, making people sick & dead to power homes. With clean coal, all of Appalachian could look like this one day. (this one is right next to an elementary school & was protesting how BoA is in on it too)

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There it is. Wow, 97 mb in 24 hrs. Huge.

Fastest intensification ever by an Atlantic hurricane: Wilma. Wilma's pressure dropped 97 millibars in 24 hours Previous record: Gilbert (1988) dropped 72 mb in 24 hours. Wilma's pressure fell 54 mb over six hours, beating Hurricane Beulah's drop of 38 mb in six hours in 1967. Wilma's 12 hour pressure fall of 83 mb beat the old 12 hour pressure fall record of 48 mb set by Hurricane Allen in 1980.
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575. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
LOW 1004 HPA NEAR 09S 76E MOVEMENT WEST 10KT
Member Since: May 24, 2006 Posts: 48 Comments: 43666
Records set in the Atlantic Hurricane Season of 2005 Link

Seasonal Records Set in 2005:

Most tropical storms: 28. Old record: 21 in 1933.
Most hurricanes: 15. Old record: 12 in 1969.
Most Category 5 hurricanes: 4 (Emily, Katrina, Rita, and Wilma). Emily was upgraded to Category 5 upon re-analysis. Old record: 2 in 1960 and 1961.
Most hurricane names to be retired: 5 (Dennis, Katrina, Rita, Stan, Wilma, and possibly others). Previous record: 4 in 1955, 1995, and 2004.
Most major hurricanes to hit the U.S.: 4 (Dennis, Katrina, Rita, Wilma). Previous record: 3 in 1893, 1909, 1933, 1954, and 2004.

Most damage ever recorded in a hurricane season: $150 billion. Previous record: approximately $50 billion dollars (normalized to 2005 dollars) set in 1992 and 2004.

Highest Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) index: 245. Previous record: 243 (1950). Average for a season is 93.

Latest end to a hurricane season: January 6 Previous record: January 5, for the 1954-55 hurricane season.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 414 Comments: 125592
Been so Many Record Low Pressure falls from the last few Years,..its hard to sort that one out.

But Im sure we will get some quick feedback.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 414 Comments: 125592
Quoting Patrap:


NASA Looks at Hurricane Cloud Tops for Windy Clues Link



Hot towers are one window into the mystery of how hurricanes grow stronger. A single hot tower does not tell you much about a hurricane, but a rapid sequence of towers suggests that something unusual is going on deep inside the hurricane.

By combining measurements from many hurricanes, statistics show that if hot towers exist in the eyewall at least 33% of the time during a three-hour period, a hurricane's destructive surface winds have an 82% chance of intensifying. Otherwise, the chance of wind intensification drops to only 17%. The bottom line is that if several hot towers are present in a hurricane over a period of time, there's a higher probability of a storm intensifying.







Patrap, was it Wilma that intensified the fastest or was it Gilbert or Mitch? i recall 50 mb in a 12 hour period, but cannot remember which it was.
Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8183

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About JeffMasters

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.