The destruction of Gilchrist, Texas

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:55 PM GMT on September 17, 2008

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We're in day three of my promised 7-10 day lull in Atlantic hurricane activity. That prediction is still looking good. There are no threat areas to discuss today, and the earliest any model foresees a tropical storm developing is Sunday, when the NOGAPS indicates something developing in the western Caribbean. The GFS model predicts this development will occur on the other side of Central America, in the Eastern Pacific. The GFS also predicts development of a tropical depression by Tuesday off the coast of Africa.

The destruction of Gilchrist
Many of you have probably seen the photo of Gilchrist, Texas showing complete destruction of the town of 750 people, save for one lone home. High-resolution satellite imagery made available by NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (Figure 1) confirm that of the approximately 1000 structures existing in the town before Hurricane Ike, only about five survived the hurricane. Approximately 200 of these buildings were homes, and it is thought that some of the residents attempted to ride out the storm in their homes. According to media reports, about 34 survivors from Gilchrist and the neighboring communities of Crystal Beach and Port Bolivar have been fished out of Galveston Bay in the past few days. Rescuers who have reached Gilchrist have not been able to find any victims in the debris because there is no debris. Ike's storm surge knocked 99.5% of the 1,000 buildings in Gilchrist off their foundations and either demolished them or washed them miles inland into the swamplands behind Gilchrist. Until search teams can locate the debris of what was once was Gilchrist, we will not know the fate of those who may have stayed behind to ride out the storm.



Figure 1. The town of Gilchrist, Texas before and after Hurricane Ike. Image credit (top): Googlemaps.com, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Houston-Galveston Area Council. Bottom: National Geodetic Survey.

Why did Gilchrist get destroyed?
It's rare to see a town so completely destroyed by a hurricane, to the point where you can't even see the wreckage. The neighboring towns of Crystal Beach, to the south, and High Island, to the north, were also mostly destroyed, but weren't swept clean of nearly all structures and wreckage. This is because Gilchrist was built in an unusually vulnerable place. It's bad enough to situate your town on a low-lying peninsula, as was the case for Crystal Beach. But in Gilchrist's case, the town was located at the narrowest point of the Bolivar Peninsula, at a point where it was only a few hundred meters wide (Figure 2). Not only did Gilchrist suffer a head-on assault by Ike's direct storm surge of 14+ feet, topped by 20' high battering waves, the town also suffered a reverse surge once the hurricane had passed. As Ike moved to the north, the counter-clockwise flow of wind around the storm pushed Galveston Bay's waters back across the town of Gilchrist from northwest to southeast. This second surge of water likely finished off anything the main storm surge had left.

Will Gilchrist be rebuilt?
I hope the government will see fit to buy up the land that was once the town of Gilchrist and make it into a park. Building a town in Gilchrist's location makes as much sense as building a town on the sides of an active volcano. (Unfortunately, there are plenty of people who have done just that, such as on the slopes of Mt. Vesuvius in Italy). If past history is any guide, Gilchrist will be rebuilt, and it will take another mighty hurricane to permanently take down the town. That was the case for the town of Indianola, Texas, which lay in a vulnerable low-lying location on the shores of Matagorda Bay in the mid-1800's. Indianola was the second largest port in the state of Texas, and home to 5,000 people. In 1875, a powerful Category 3 hurricane piled up a huge storm surge as it came ashore in Indianola. The surge destroyed 3/4 of the town's 2,000 buildings, and killed 176 people. The city was rebuilt, but in 1886, a devastating Category 4 hurricane swept almost the entire town of Indianola into Matagorda Bay, killing another 250 townspeople. The people of Indianola finally gave up and moved elsewhere, and the ruins of their town now lie under four feet of water in Matagorda Bay.


Figure 2. The Bolivar Peninsula, Texas before Hurricane Ike. The "A" pink balloon marker shows the location of Crystal Beach. Gilchrist is to the northeast of Crystal Beach, at a point where the peninsula narrows down to just a few hundred meters wide. Image credit: Googlemaps.com, TerraMetrica, LeadDog Consulting, Tele Atlas.

Links to follow
High-resolution photos of the Bolivar Peninsula are available using Microsoft's HD View Beta.

How you can help
For those of you who want to help those in need, I'm proud to say that a group of wunderground members are spearheading their own Hurricane Ike relief effort, aimed at providing assistance and supplies to people that are not in the mainstream relief areas. They've already raised $5000, and the first relief truck with supplies is on the way to Texas. Deductions are tax-deductible, and can be made in several ways:

Patrap's wunderblog
www.stormjunkie.com
www.portlight.org

Everything they are doing is at the specific request of people on the scene. At the request of the Director of Disability Affairs for the Mayor of Houston, they are sending 50 wheelchairs, 500 walkers, 200 pairs of crutches, and several pallets of first aid supplies. They are also sending a 16-foot truck from Charleston loaded with drinks, personal hygiene products, and non perishable food items. A truck is heading out of New Orleans with similar supplies. Every Catholic school in South Carolina is collecting supplies with the goal of filling two more trucks.

Of course, contributing to the Red Cross or your local church is another great way to help out. Thanks!

Jeff Masters

San Leon,Texas Devastated by Hurricane Ike pt.3 (txcuda)
Images taken in San Leon,Texas along Bayshore Dr.and Ave A 1/2 Tuesday afternoon. The devastation caused by Hurricane Ike is something that will take this community years to recover from. Relief crews from both the National Guard as well as the Red Cross were seen this afternoon. Quite a few residents will find that they no longer have a home when they return. Those that rode the storm out along the bayshore are fortunate to be still with us as there have been quite a few fatalities in just this small community.Electricity is weeks if not months off...and water service will be a week or more before it can be restored. Crews were out this afternoon shutting off service to meters that had no home any longer. The mosquitos are out in clouds but at least
San Leon,Texas Devastated by Hurricane Ike pt.3
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962. lopaka001
7:53 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
This email confirms that you have donated to WUBA IKE Relief (pjp1201@cox.net) using PayPal.
Confirmation number: 39H***04VY291**01
Portlight Strategies


I did my part..
Good Day everyone!
;=)
Member Since: February 19, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 239
961. goldmoon
5:11 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Quoting keywestbrat:
if they put as much effort into getting people out of the barrier islands as they do about not letting anyone back on the island probably alot more people would be alive, I agree that there are alot more people not accounted for that they are letting on, if you think about it the houses are gone and so are the ones that stayed in those houses, you would not have a chance with all the debry sloshing around in the surge, sad but true,


I know it is a lot to hope for, but I posted a picture of what my parents survived and swam out of during Katrina earlier in this blog. They were 73 and 64 at the time, and saved their three dogs.


Maybe we'll hear of a few more miracles.


960. MahFL
4:38 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
We keep hearing of putting first responders lives at risk.
First responders are usually very carefull, well trained and experinced.

When was the last time a first responder died in a Hurricane related rescue ?
Member Since: June 9, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 3295
959. TheCaneWhisperer
3:42 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
958. fireflymom 3:22 PM GMT on September 18, 2008

They should change that. It's irresponsible and selfish to defy a mandatory evac. Decisions like that not only put you in grave danger, they also put the people who have to come rescue you in danger as well. Financial ramifications, that take a back seat at that point because life is more important, apply as well.
958. fireflymom
3:22 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Remember folks this is Texas and even an mandatory evacuation does not mean that they can make anyone leave. I f folk choose to stay there is no way they can be dragged out of here. Natures culling process is able to work unimpeded at storm time. Sad but everyone here is doing their best to pick up all the pieces. My husband works on Galveston Island and people there including the may or are operating very little sleep, trying to use the available resources to the benefit of the greatest population. The one water main from the mainland to the island will take a great deal of repair before they have running water. The natural gas generators are useless as the gas has been turned off due to leaks and the is no power other than gas or diesel generators. Beginning to get limited phone service and water is being trucked in as are groceries and tents for some of the workers to be fed under. Incredible amount of work has already been accomplished but so much more to do.Those on the island and surrounding areas really deserve a break folks, negativity only begets negativity. We need more positive words to support the people who are working so hard in poor conditions with very little to work with.
Member Since: June 5, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 588
957. TheCaneWhisperer
3:18 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Quoting hurricane23:


At this time the convection your seeing on IR is being caused by an interaction with a upper level low and a tropical wave in the vicinity.I see no signs of a surface feature developing.The caribbean/gulf is the area to watch during the next week or two as the wet phase pushes into the area.



Not saying there is but, there is certainly a mid-level feature. Remember this?

Tropical Depression Ten formed 1100 statute miles (1770 km) east of the Lesser Antilles on August 13. Conditions were not favorable for development, as strong vertical shear literally ripped the system apart, and advisories were discontinued the next day when it showed no organized deep convection. The remnants of Tropical Depression Ten continued drifting northwestward before degenerating into a tropical wave north of the Leeward Islands. The mid-level remnant circulation eventually merged with another system in the "complex genesis" of what would become Tropical Depression Twelve and, eventually, Hurricane Katrina.[14]

Not comparing the two but, the mid-level / Tropical Wave interaction is there. ULL is enhancing the activity.
956. Flewid
3:15 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Quoting twifob:


Please turn your tinfoil hat to SHINY SIDE OUT.

Lyme disease was first clinically described in the 1880s in Europe. In the USA, it was called tickborne meningopolyneuritis, Garin-Bujadoux syndrome, Bannworth syndrome, Afzelius syndrome, Montauk Knee or sheep tick fever.

West Nile virus was not studied in the USA until after it became endemic here.

If that entire lab was battered into pieces, releasing all the viruses, no one would be in any danger. They can't survive long outside the host, and have to be transmitted in specific ways - casual contact isn't enough. Sunlight, pH changes, and other environmental factors kill them quickly. They decay, just like other proteins.


Figures that there would be a government disinformation specialist lurking on this site. LOL, pardon my duh.
Member Since: August 29, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
955. Bones429
3:03 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
For those people thinking about volunteering to assist following a disaster, FEMA has a course about it and it might be surprising to some, exactly what governments think about what is called spontaneous volunteers the problems associated with them
Link
954. CTSkywatcher
2:51 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
916. Makes me angry....pouring coffee over head.....:~(((
Ah, isn't nature great? We have hurricanes to balance out tropospheric heat build up...and we have these lazy irresponsible folks that are the opposite of our Pat/SJ/Press etc etc...Ying and Yang. I feel for our volunteers...strong folks indeed.
And here comes the MJO ahead of schedule.....
Member Since: March 31, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 52
953. usa777
2:49 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Were talking about some alternate plans for this also Conchy. I'm just so time restricted at work and my employer was kind enough to give us off a week to help out. Who knows, we will figure something out.
Quoting conchygirl:
Interesting, I got the same thing when I tried to volunteer for Charley, however, they indicated they had some paid positions available. So I gave it up and just donated. We even donated old (but in excellent condition) appliances to Salvation Army as they desperately needed them in the Punta Gorda area.
Member Since: August 11, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 164
952. JRRP
2:45 PM GMT on September 18, 2008

Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 5340
951. conchygirl
2:45 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Quoting txalwaysprepared:
I have to say... I am very proud of my little Texas community down here. As I drove around yesterday... No one is waiting for assistance. No one is waiting for the government, handouts, what-have-you to start and clean up. People are helping each other. Using their own tractors, bulldozers and such. It was great to see.

I'm pleased to see the majority of people not sitting here waiting for a govt bailout or blaming the govt for not coming in to help them fast enough.
Yeah, good things happening amongst the difficult times. Nice to hear this especially after some of what I was just reading from the shelters.
Member Since: June 11, 2008 Posts: 24 Comments: 5910
950. flaboyinga
2:42 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
929. FLDART1 2:12 PM GMT on September 18, 2008



Where were the photos of the damaged house taken?
949. conchygirl
2:39 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Quoting usa777:

Wow...Yeah we were wondering the same thing. 2 Days before we were instructed to head to Houston and to bring as many people as we could find. Sounds like things are a little clustered right now.
Interesting, I got the same thing when I tried to volunteer for Charley, however, they indicated they had some paid positions available. So I gave it up and just donated. We even donated old (but in excellent condition) appliances to Salvation Army as they desperately needed them in the Punta Gorda area.
Member Since: June 11, 2008 Posts: 24 Comments: 5910
948. BajaALemt
2:36 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Dart...lemme email what I was trying to say...brb
Member Since: September 25, 2007 Posts: 53 Comments: 8533
947. sporteguy03
2:36 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
There is an upper level trough interacting with a tropical wave, there is no upper level low near the islands.
Member Since: July 7, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 5153
946. FLDART1
2:33 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
yes?
Member Since: August 4, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 201
945. usa777
2:32 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Quoting KRL:


Yep. Seen it before first hand. At a distribution point in Florida after the canes a few years back and this location had long lines of people waiting to get stuff. I inquired where to volunteer to help out handing out the relief packages, and got rebuffed with this fellow saying "We're not taking any more volunteers, we're all disorganized because we've got too many volunteers here already."

So being persistent, on the way out I asked a Sheriff who was directing traffic if there was a way to volunteer and help out, and he had the same attitude, gruffly waving me off with a "Sir just keep moving, we've got enough help here already."

Go figure . . .


Wow...Yeah we were wondering the same thing. 2 Days before we were instructed to head to Houston and to bring as many people as we could find. Sounds like things are a little clustered right now.
Member Since: August 11, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 164
944. JRRP
2:32 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
O o
Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 5340
943. KendallHurricane
2:30 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Quoting hurricane23:


At this time the convection your seeing on IR is being caused by an interaction with a upper level low and a tropical wave in the vicinity.I see no signs of a surface feature developing.The caribbean/gulf is the area to watch during the next week or two as the wet phase pushing into the area.
it could deveop a surface circulation probably if it moves towards the western carribean
Member Since: August 14, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 498
942. BajaALemt
2:29 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
929. FLDART1

Hmmm...DARRT?
Member Since: September 25, 2007 Posts: 53 Comments: 8533
940. hurricane23
2:27 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Quoting KendallHurricane:
something is brewing across the leeward/windward islands Looks intresting could this be what the models have been indicating development in the caribean


At this time the convection your seeing on IR is being caused by an interaction with a upper level low and a tropical wave in the vicinity.I see no signs of a surface feature developing.The caribbean/gulf is the area to watch during the next week or two as the wet phase pushes into the area.
Member Since: May 14, 2006 Posts: 8 Comments: 13626
938. charlottefl
2:25 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Typically this time of year we start to get out of Cape Verde type storms and get into more homegrown storms, but with the pattern we're seeing with stronger than normal ridges I'm starting to wonder.

Member Since: December 18, 2006 Posts: 7 Comments: 2685
937. Bones429
2:24 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Quoting RayRayfromLa:
It angers and sickens my stomach to see fellow Louisianians acting like this: This is an incert from a RN working at a shelter for Hurricane Gustav in Shreveport, La.
There are some really GREAT people that live here in our great state...however, the bad always outweighs the good.




Before everyone thinks I am a terrible, prejudiced, horrible person, just wanted to send a copy of the letter I sent to the Times editors and Bill O'Reilly. Please pray that Hurricane Ike will NOT come to Louisiana - I don't think I have the attitude of Christ yet!

Sherri



Dear Editor,

I am a nurse who has just completed volunteer working approximately 120 hours as the clinic director in a Hurricane Gustav evacuation shelter in Shreveport , Louisiana over the last 7 days. I would love to see someone look at the evacuee situation from a new perspective. Local and national news channels have covered the evacuation and "horrible" conditions the evacuees had to endure during Hurricane Gustav.

True - some things were not optimal for the evacuation and the shelters need some modification.

At any point, does anyone address the responsibility (or irresponsibility) of the evacuees?

Does it seem wrong that one would remember their cell phone, charger, cigarettes and lighter but forget their child's insulin?

Is something amiss when an evacuee gets off the bus, walks immediately to the medical area, and requests immediate free refills on all medicines for which they cannot provide a prescription or current bottle (most of which are narcotics)?

Isn't the system flawed when an evacuee says they cannot afford a $3 copay for a refill that will be delivered to them in the shelter yet they can take a city-provided bus to Wal-mart, buy 5 bottles of Vodka, and return to consume them secretly in the shelter?

Is it fair to stop performing luggage checks on incoming evacuees so as not to delay the registration process but endanger the volunteer staff and other persons with the very realistic truth of drugs, alcohol and weapons being brought into the shelter?

Am I less than compassionate when it frustrates me to scrub emesis from the floor near a nauseated child while his mother lies nearby, watching me work 26 hours straight, not even raising her head from the pillow to comfort her own son?

Why does it insense me to hear a man say "I ain't goin' home 'til I get my F EMA check" when I would love to just go home and see my daughters who I have only seen 3 times this week?

Is the system flawed when the privately insured patient must find a way to get to the pharmacy, fill his prescription and pay his copay while the F EMA declaration allows the uninsured person to acquire free medications under the disaster rules?

Does it seem odd that the nurse volunteering at the shelter is paying for childcare while the evacuee sits on a cot during the day as the shelter provides a "daycare"?

Have government entitlements created this mentality and am I facilitating it with my work?

Will I be a bad person, merciless nurse or poor Christian if I hesitate to work at the next shelter because I have worked for 7 days being called every curse word imaginable, feeling threatened and fearing for my personal safety in the shelter?

Exhausted and battered,

Sherri Hagerhjelm, RN





We saw the same things at shelters in Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky and North Carolina. But we also saw evacueee's rob, assault, threaten local government officals, demand that they be housed in hotels and not the free shelters, complain about the free food that was provided, they demanded 30 day supplies of meds when they were only here for less than a week, destroyed or damaged shelter equipment and facilities, stated they had no money to return home with, but were able to go out and buy booze, pot and other drugs and use them in the shelters.
936. twifob
2:24 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Quoting Flewid:


Mm. Biohazard level 4. Yes. They have one of those off the end of Long Island. It is called "Plum Island". Google it if you like. It is purely a coincidence that Lyme disease got started just a few miles over the water in Lyme Conneticutt, not long after a strong storm blew through. Ditto West Nile.


Please turn your tinfoil hat to SHINY SIDE OUT.

Lyme disease was first clinically described in the 1880s in Europe. In the USA, it was called tickborne meningopolyneuritis, Garin-Bujadoux syndrome, Bannworth syndrome, Afzelius syndrome, Montauk Knee or sheep tick fever.

West Nile virus was not studied in the USA until after it became endemic here.

If that entire lab was battered into pieces, releasing all the viruses, no one would be in any danger. They can't survive long outside the host, and have to be transmitted in specific ways - casual contact isn't enough. Sunlight, pH changes, and other environmental factors kill them quickly. They decay, just like other proteins.
935. KendallHurricane
2:23 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
something is brewing across the leeward/windward islands Looks intresting could this be what the models have been indicating development in the caribean
Member Since: August 14, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 498
934. hurricane23
2:21 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Some pretty good consensus on something possibly sub-tropical in nature of the eastcoast.The ECMWF has been showing some development of the coast for a few runs now.

As far as the CMC iam not buying it until i see some more reliable models picking up on development.CMC/NOGAPS is not enough for me.The GFS has been developing a tc of the african coast for a while no but till now i see 0 signs of it taking place.If development were to take shape out there in my view the chances are low it ever becomes a threat to the U.S.

Adrian
Member Since: May 14, 2006 Posts: 8 Comments: 13626
933. Hurricajun
2:20 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
txalways,
That is how it is here, and it is so great to see your town try to build itself back up and get smiles on everyone's faces instead of waiting for someone to do it for you!!!!
Member Since: July 3, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 48
932. KRL
2:16 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Quoting usa777:
I wanted to give you all an update on myself and 3 co-workers planned trip to Texas for Red Cross relief help. We were informed last night 3 hrs before our departure that our help wasnt needed. According to our local Red Cross Rep, there are so many people in the area helping that excessive volunteers are hampering the situation. We are left standing there completely confused!!!Has anyone else heard anything about this as no one I have talked to can explain this to us????


Yep. Seen it before first hand. At a distribution point in Florida after the canes a few years back and this location had long lines of people waiting to get stuff. I inquired where to volunteer to help out handing out the relief packages, and got rebuffed with this fellow saying "We're not taking any more volunteers, we're all disorganized because we've got too many volunteers here already."

So being persistent, on the way out I asked a Sheriff who was directing traffic if there was a way to volunteer and help out, and he had the same attitude, gruffly waving me off with a "Sir just keep moving, we've got enough help here already."

Go figure . . .

Member Since: July 31, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 231
931. txalwaysprepared
2:12 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
I have to say... I am very proud of my little Texas community down here. As I drove around yesterday... No one is waiting for assistance. No one is waiting for the government, handouts, what-have-you to start and clean up. People are helping each other. Using their own tractors, bulldozers and such. It was great to see.

I'm pleased to see the majority of people not sitting here waiting for a govt bailout or blaming the govt for not coming in to help them fast enough.
Member Since: August 18, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 1642
930. chsstormgirl
2:12 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
That makes total sense... sounds like some of the people I know
Member Since: September 20, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 118
929. FLDART1
2:12 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Photobucket
Photobucket
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928. Dar9598
2:11 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
The tropics will begin to increase it's activity 3 to 5 days from now.
927. jcpoulard
2:11 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Hello every one ! The CMC develop 144 hours by now a Hurricane N of Hispaniola and a other one W of CV.

See the link

The season will see a other intensity pic before November.
Member Since: September 15, 2005 Posts: 4 Comments: 114
926. FLDART1
2:10 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Photobucket
Photobucket
Member Since: August 4, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 201
925. chicagowatcher
2:10 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Quoting BeanTech:


100% ? Of course not. You do the best you can.
My point is that she is mayor of a town that is highly vunerable during season. Based on what I've seen so far, she doesn't act like she has much clue at all as to what she's doing. She looks like a deer caught in the headlights on tv.


The frustrating part of it is that there is no process of any kind in place that would help these folks prevent and deal with these disasters. SJ has pretty well documented that the mayor of Galveston probably could have acted with a more appropriate sense of urgency (given that alot of the bloggers here were more afraid than she was). In '05 we saw the same thing with Ray Nagin. How many times do we have to watch this tragedy played out over and over again?
Member Since: August 28, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 153
924. FLDART1
2:08 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Photobucket
Photobucket
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923. hurricane23
2:07 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Taz please stop with these ridiculous statements although it would be great news for the season to be cut short i see no signs of that happening.We could easily see 4-5 named storms before its all said and done this season.Now wheather they impact land is a different story.
Member Since: May 14, 2006 Posts: 8 Comments: 13626
922. Nolehead
2:06 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
morning everyone...hope everyone that was in Ike's path is ok...
Member Since: June 3, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 1924
921. Orcasystems
2:04 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
916. RayRayfromLa 1:56 PM GMT on September 18, 2008

Easily the best post of the day.
Member Since: October 1, 2007 Posts: 81 Comments: 26511
920. momma4
2:03 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Sorry. I did miss Rita.

Not intentional for sure.

919. Hurricajun
2:02 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Before you look at this link, please be aware that we know the people in Texas have suffered major losses but it is great to see our Governor of Louisiana standing up for his people and his state!!! Link
Member Since: July 3, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 48
918. WxLogic
2:01 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Quoting Orcasystems:


Its been pretty reliable this year. Thats being said, I have noticed it will develop something.. then a few runs later drop it... and then it will be picked up by other models and actually happen, before the CMC picks it up again, if that made any sense?


LOL!!! Indeed... it has being doing good this year... seems like is alive. After it knows something might develop it begins doubting itself and then backs out.
Member Since: August 14, 2008 Posts: 4 Comments: 4928
917. MahFL
2:01 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
"The residents of Gilchrist
would like to publicly thank
the US Army Corps of Engineers
and the State of Texas
for their brilliant work
to protect and enhance
our beaches!"

Oh someone forget Mother Nature has a say.....
Member Since: June 9, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 3295
916. RayRayfromLa
1:56 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
It angers and sickens my stomach to see fellow Louisianians acting like this: This is an incert from a RN working at a shelter for Hurricane Gustav in Shreveport, La.
There are some really GREAT people that live here in our great state...however, the bad always outweighs the good.




Before everyone thinks I am a terrible, prejudiced, horrible person, just wanted to send a copy of the letter I sent to the Times editors and Bill O'Reilly. Please pray that Hurricane Ike will NOT come to Louisiana - I don't think I have the attitude of Christ yet!

Sherri



Dear Editor,

I am a nurse who has just completed volunteer working approximately 120 hours as the clinic director in a Hurricane Gustav evacuation shelter in Shreveport , Louisiana over the last 7 days. I would love to see someone look at the evacuee situation from a new perspective. Local and national news channels have covered the evacuation and "horrible" conditions the evacuees had to endure during Hurricane Gustav.

True - some things were not optimal for the evacuation and the shelters need some modification.

At any point, does anyone address the responsibility (or irresponsibility) of the evacuees?

Does it seem wrong that one would remember their cell phone, charger, cigarettes and lighter but forget their child's insulin?

Is something amiss when an evacuee gets off the bus, walks immediately to the medical area, and requests immediate free refills on all medicines for which they cannot provide a prescription or current bottle (most of which are narcotics)?

Isn't the system flawed when an evacuee says they cannot afford a $3 copay for a refill that will be delivered to them in the shelter yet they can take a city-provided bus to Wal-mart, buy 5 bottles of Vodka, and return to consume them secretly in the shelter?

Is it fair to stop performing luggage checks on incoming evacuees so as not to delay the registration process but endanger the volunteer staff and other persons with the very realistic truth of drugs, alcohol and weapons being brought into the shelter?

Am I less than compassionate when it frustrates me to scrub emesis from the floor near a nauseated child while his mother lies nearby, watching me work 26 hours straight, not even raising her head from the pillow to comfort her own son?

Why does it insense me to hear a man say "I ain't goin' home 'til I get my F EMA check" when I would love to just go home and see my daughters who I have only seen 3 times this week?

Is the system flawed when the privately insured patient must find a way to get to the pharmacy, fill his prescription and pay his copay while the F EMA declaration allows the uninsured person to acquire free medications under the disaster rules?

Does it seem odd that the nurse volunteering at the shelter is paying for childcare while the evacuee sits on a cot during the day as the shelter provides a "daycare"?

Have government entitlements created this mentality and am I facilitating it with my work?

Will I be a bad person, merciless nurse or poor Christian if I hesitate to work at the next shelter because I have worked for 7 days being called every curse word imaginable, feeling threatened and fearing for my personal safety in the shelter?

Exhausted and battered,

Sherri Hagerhjelm, RN



Member Since: August 18, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 89
915. MahFL
1:56 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
I wonder if they tempted fate....

"The Gilchrist area has a bright future being the closest oceanfront resort area to the Beaumont Port Arthur energy capital, where over 10 billion dollars in investment capital for new energy and chemical plants has been approved"

from http://www.bolivarchamber.org.
Member Since: June 9, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 3295
914. Flewid
1:55 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Quoting Celia1970:


According to the Sunshine Project, the lab at UT-MB Galveston ins a Level 4 facility. Following is the definition of Level 4 Biohazard:

"Biohazard Level 4: Exclusively viruses that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, dengue fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other various hemorrhagic diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release."

Bio-Labs in Texas are known neither for their transparency nor adherence to safety protocol. During the past year, there have been reports of safety violations in both Texas A & M and University of Texas--Austin Labs. UT-Austin fired the last employee who spoke out about lack of safety--after they hired him to help get things straight.

UTMB is not known for its openness.

If you are concerned, a good starting point is with the Sunshine Project.
Link


Mm. Biohazard level 4. Yes. They have one of those off the end of Long Island. It is called "Plum Island". Google it if you like. It is purely a coincidence that Lyme disease got started just a few miles over the water in Lyme Conneticutt, not long after a strong storm blew through. Ditto West Nile.
Member Since: August 29, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
913. Orcasystems
1:54 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
Quoting chsstormgirl:
Orca,

How reliable is the CMC regarding development? I know that the GFS is the most reliable overall, and it seems sometimes that the CMC just develops everything. You think this is a serious possibility for the East Coast?

Thanks!


Its been pretty reliable this year. Thats being said, I have noticed it will develop something.. then a few runs later drop it... and then it will be picked up by other models and actually happen, before the CMC picks it up again, if that made any sense?
Member Since: October 1, 2007 Posts: 81 Comments: 26511
912. NEwxguy
1:54 PM GMT on September 18, 2008
cmc loves to spin up storms,so find it hard to take it seriously.
Member Since: September 6, 2007 Posts: 874 Comments: 15595

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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