DEBATE ON GLOBAL WARMING!{Tesla}

By: Fshhead , 7:41 PM GMT on July 12, 2007

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This is my continuing blog on global warming. If you are new visitor, please look at last couple of blog entrys also on global warming!!!!







"There are so many arguments proving & disputing global warming that people can't seem to agree completly on it. But for all the preperations that we make for hurricanes & other disasters, what do we have to lose if we prepare for global warming as if the worst might come true?
The answer is pure common sense. We should try to eliminate the variables that cause global warming instead of just arguing about it. It's like a hurricane- if we prepare for the worst, it can only save lives & money. If it does not come, no one will have been hurt & we may even have a healthier Earth."


Book I recommend reading:


Videos I recommend:
"Who killed the electric car?"
HBO'S "To hot Not to handle"
"Inconvienent Truth"




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1051. sullivanweather
12:52 PM EST on November 11, 2007
This story is just plain foolishness...

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Fighting fat and climate change By SETH BORENSTEIN, AP Science Writer
35 minutes ago



WASHINGTON - America's obesity epidemic and global warming might not seem to have much in common. But public health experts suggest people can attack them both by cutting calories and carbon dioxide at the same time.


How? Get out of your car and walk or bike half an hour a day instead of driving. And while you're at it, eat less red meat. That's how Americans can simultaneously save the planet and their health, say doctors and climate scientists.

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That makes absolutely no sense. Walk or ride a bike instead of driving? Walk or bike for what? Recreation? If so, who drives their car for half an hour...for fun? Seriously. I don't know of anyone that just goes and drives their car around the block, just because. Does the author of this article mean walk or bike to the store? To work? What is this in reference to?


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The payoffs are huge, although unlikely to happen. One numbers-crunching scientist calculates that if all Americans between 10 and 74 walked just half an hour a day instead of driving, they would cut the annual U.S. emissions of carbon dioxide, the chief greenhouse gas, by 64 million tons.

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Again, what is this in reference to? How would a 10 year old kid walking a half hour a day save any CO2? Do 10 year old kids even drive cars, like the sentence above suggests? I think we're beginning to reach just a bit much.

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About 6.5 billion gallons of gasoline would be saved. And Americans would also shed more than 3 billion pounds overall, according to these calculations.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is considering public promotion of the "co-benefits" of fighting global warming and obesity-related illnesses through everyday exercise, like walking to school or work, said Dr. Howard Frumkin, director of the CDC's National Center for Environmental Health.

"A simple intervention like walking to school is a climate change intervention, an obesity intervention, a diabetes intervention, a safety intervention," Frumkin told The Associated Press. "That's the sweet spot."

Climate change is a deadly and worsening public health issue, said Frumkin and other experts. The World Health Organization estimated that 160,000 people died in 2000 from malaria, diarrhea, malnutrition and drownings from floods — problems that public health and climate scientists contend were worsened by global warming. Officials predict that in the future those numbers will be higher.

The American Public Health Association, which will highlight the health problems of global warming in April, is seeking to connect obesity and climate change solutions, said executive director Dr. Georges Benjamin.

"This may present the greatest public health opportunity that we've had in a century," said University of Wisconsin health sciences professor Dr. Jonathan Patz, president of the International Association for Ecology and Health.

The key is getting people out of the car, Patz and Frumkin told the public health association at its annual convention. Reducing car travel in favor of biking or walking would not only cut obesity and greenhouse gases, they said, it would also mean less smog, fewer deaths from car crashes, less osteoporosis, and even less depression since exercise helps beat the blues.

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I pose a question, would fewer deaths from car crashes equal more pedestrian related deaths now that the roads would fill up with people walking?? Do these scientist consider this? Or are they just being short sided?

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In a little-noticed scientific paper in 2005, Paul Higgins, a scientist and policy fellow with the American Meteorological Society, calculated specific savings from adopting federal government recommendations for half an hour a day of exercise instead of driving.

The average person walking half an hour a day would lose about 13 pounds a year. And if everyone did that instead of driving the same distance, the nation would burn a total of 10.5 trillion calories, according to the scientist, formerly with the University of California at Berkeley. At the same time, that would cut carbon dioxide emissions by about the same amount New Mexico produces, he said.

"The real bang for the buck in reducing greenhouse gas emissions was from the avoided health expenses of a sedentary lifestyle," said Higgins.

But it's not just getting out of the car that's needed, said Dr. Robert Lawrence of the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. A diet shift away from heavy meat consumption would also go far, he said, because it takes much more energy and land to produce meat than fruits, vegetables and grains.

Recent studies support that argument. Last year the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization reported that the meat sector of the global economy is responsible for 18 percent of the world's greenhouse gas emissions. Much of that is indirect, including the fertilizer needed to grow massive amounts of feed for livestock, energy use in the whole growing process, methane released from fertilizer and animal manure, and transportation of the cattle and meat products.

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Once again there's a tremendous amount of short sightedness in this paragraph. If less meat is consumed, more fruits and vegetables would need to be grown, natrually. Fruits and vegetables that ALSO need fertilizer to be grown and these products just don't magically apppear on store shelves either. Something has to bring them there. Usually refrigerated trains, trucks and ships. There's also a lot of fruits and vegetables that are imported from the other side of the globe, say kiwis and out of season apples from New Zealand. Do they consider the surge in demand of these products once meat is cut from diets and other sources of food need to be met? Do they think that shipping a box a kiwis from New Zealand to the United States would be a better alternative than trucking a box of meat from Omaha to Chicago?

Similar calculations were made in a study in September in the medical journal Lancet.

The average American man eats 1.6 times as much meat as the government recommends, Lawrence said. Some studies have shown eating a lot of red meat is linked to a higher risk for colon cancer.

As for fighting obesity and global warming by walking and cycling, don't expect people to do it easily, said Kristie Ebi. She's a Virginia public health consultant and one of the lead authors of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report.

Citing the decades-long effort to curb smoking, she said, "It turns out changing people's habits is very hard."
Member Since: March 8, 2007 Posts: 273 Comments: 12612
1050. sullivanweather
12:50 PM EST on November 11, 2007
$100 a barrel next week.

Cold air is coming down for next weekend.
Member Since: March 8, 2007 Posts: 273 Comments: 12612
1049. Fshhead
8:08 PM GMT on November 10, 2007
Oil inches higher as traders inhale
Midday trading slows after a record-breaking run; North Sea production is back online.


NEW YORK (AP) -- Oil prices crept slightly higher Friday as markets took a breather from the feverish trading that has fueled a race to record prices.

Light, sweet crude for December delivery on the New York Mercantile Exchange settled 86 cents higher at $96.32 - after reaching an intraday high of $96.65 in New York.

"We're out of adrenaline, the market's just a little fatigued," said Tim Evans, an analyst at Citigroup Inc. in New York. "We've run a long way and it's time for things to slow down a little bit."

A price movement of even $1.50 to $2 is considered narrow in today's market, he said.

On Thursday, the contract fell 91 cents to settle at $95.46 after Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke said the housing slump and high oil prices, among other factors, will slow economic growth in coming months.

In London, Brent crude rose 70 cents to $93.49 a barrel on the ICE Futures Exchange.

News of two shutdowns in the North Sea exacerbated supply worries earlier in the session. But oil companies operating in the region said Friday that they had begun restarting shut-in output totaling at least 330,000 barrels of oil equivalent a day.

Energy investors worry that any slowdown in the U.S. or global economy will crimp demand for oil and gasoline. The U.S. is the world's largest user of oil, accounting for about a quarter of daily petroleum consumption.

Oil prices fluctuate on Bernanke, supplies
StatoilHydro ASA said it restarted production at its Visund oil field early Friday and expects to bring its Oseberg South field back online later in the day. Both fields account for around 110,000 barrels a day of oil production. BP PLC also expects to restart oil and gas production at its 80,000 barrel-a-day Valhall field later Friday as winds in the region ease.

ConocoPhillips (Charts, Fortune 500) said it had no reports of damage to its oil installations in the Ekofisk region after the storm and it was sending evacuated crews back to the closed platforms.

In the heating oil and natural gas markets, traders were excited about forecasts for temperatures to cool to more seasonal levels over the next couple of weeks, Evans said.

Heating oil futures rose 2.36 cents to $2.6294 a gallon on the Nymex, while natural gas futures rose 15 cents to $7.863 per 1,000 cubic feet.

Gasoline prices climbed 1 cent to $2.4476 a gallon.

Word of a power outage and fire Thursday at Valero Energy Corp (Charts, Fortune 500).'s 325,000 barrel a day refinery in Port Arthur, Texas, supported prices somewhat. While it's too early to tell how much production will be affected, the outage added to investor concerns.

Crude prices are within the range of inflation-adjusted highs set in early 1980. Depending on how the adjustment is calculated, $38 a barrel then would be worth $96 to $103 or more today.

Estimates of where crude prices will head from here vary. Many analysts expect prices to increase to at least $100 a barrel, but a growing chorus is warning that futures are due for a sharp downturn soon.

"If this market has trained me in any fashion, it's not to expect anything and to be prepared for anything," Evans said.

Few analysts believe the underlying fundamentals of supply and demand support such high prices. Many blame speculative investing fueled by the weak dollar for oil's recent run-up. Oil futures offer a hedge against a weak dollar, and oil futures bought and sold in dollars are more attractive to foreign investors when the U.S. currency is falling.
Link
Member Since: November 19, 2005 Posts: 9 Comments: 9960
1047. Fshhead
9:44 PM GMT on November 09, 2007
Yea have to totally agree again lol
As far as the oil situation, BOTH parties should be working together as AMERICANS on this issue. It affects everyone in this country. I have posted it sooo many times that I dont think people realize how much impact has on almost every aspect of our lives!!
Member Since: November 19, 2005 Posts: 9 Comments: 9960
1046. sullivanweather
4:38 PM EST on November 09, 2007
Our whole gov't is in neutral right now.

The dems can't get anything passed w/o republican obstruction in congress and Bush vetos.

This is ridiculous. Common ground must be found. While the rest of the world is working together our leadership can't even work amongst themselves. It beginning to show its effects in society right now. A country can't continue to survive at the top without good leaders.
Member Since: March 8, 2007 Posts: 273 Comments: 12612
1045. Fshhead
9:38 PM GMT on November 09, 2007
I was just reading that Flea from the Chili Peppers took a test drive in the Tesla. They are offering test drives to reserved customers & let them comment on it in their blogs...
Link
Member Since: November 19, 2005 Posts: 9 Comments: 9960
1044. Fshhead
9:35 PM GMT on November 09, 2007
Yea Sully,
I could not agree more with that statement!That also goes for both parties too. I seem to remember all this talk from the Dems. to get elected about standing UP to Big Oil. Hmmmm personally I am not seeing it lol
Member Since: November 19, 2005 Posts: 9 Comments: 9960
1043. sullivanweather
4:33 PM EST on November 09, 2007
If gov't would give these alternative energy folks the same kind of incentives and tax breaks the oil co's get we'd be moving in the right direction.

Obviously, since this has not happened yet, you see where our governments' heart lies.
Member Since: March 8, 2007 Posts: 273 Comments: 12612
1042. Fshhead
9:28 PM GMT on November 09, 2007
Man I cringe to think of the pump prices by years end. It's really going to put a damper on the holiday shopping! I just wish this country would FINALLY wake up & do something about it.
Member Since: November 19, 2005 Posts: 9 Comments: 9960
1041. sullivanweather
4:21 PM EST on November 09, 2007
To top it off it's snowing!!

Man, thank goodness it's Friday and markets are closed until Monday, when it should be warmer.

Otherwise we'd be over 100 by tomorrow
Member Since: March 8, 2007 Posts: 273 Comments: 12612
1040. Fshhead
9:21 PM GMT on November 09, 2007
PEAK OIL: LIFE AFTER THE OIL CRASH!!
Dear Reader,

Civilization as we know it is coming to an end soon. This is not the wacky proclamation of a doomsday cult, apocalypse bible prophecy sect, or conspiracy theory society. Rather, it is the scientific conclusion of the best paid, most widely-respected geologists, physicists, bankers, and investors in the world. These are rational, professional, conservative individuals who are absolutely terrified by a phenomenon known as global "Peak Oil."

"Are We 'Running Out'? I Thought

There Was 40 Years of the Stuff Left"


Oil will not just "run out" because all oil production follows a bell curve. This is true whether we're talking about an individual field, a country, or on the planet as a whole.
Oil is increasingly plentiful on the upslope of the bell curve, increasingly scarce and expensive on the down slope. The peak of the curve coincides with the point at which the endowment of oil has been 50 percent depleted. Once the peak is passed, oil production begins to go down while cost begins to go up.
In practical and considerably oversimplified terms, this means that if 2005 was the year of global Peak Oil, worldwide oil production in the year 2030 will be the same as it was in 1980. However, the world?s population in 2030 will be both much larger (approximately twice) and much more industrialized (oil-dependent) than it was in 1980. Consequently, worldwide demand for oil will outpace worldwide production of oil by a significant margin. As a result, the price will skyrocket, oil dependant economies will crumble, and resource wars will explode.
Link

I think this should be posted again, it is heavily referenced & sourced.
I encourage everyone to read through all of it!!
Member Since: November 19, 2005 Posts: 9 Comments: 9960
1039. Fshhead
9:05 PM GMT on November 09, 2007
Hey Sully,
Man all I know is this. Prices around here are around $3.10. With a few stations starting to show $3.19. With the barrel price hovering near $100 & heading into winter those same folks if they are in northern states are REALLY going to be in trouble soon! I just cannot believe that their is not more outcry about the current oil situation.
Member Since: November 19, 2005 Posts: 9 Comments: 9960
1038. sullivanweather
3:45 PM EST on November 09, 2007
Fish,

I find this article is tremendously misleading.

Rich Wall Street investors are keeping this economy artificially inflated.

For middle class (excluding upper-middle class) and folks making less, the oil prices are hitting these people HARD. What's keeping them aloft is all the credit that people were able to obtain, which they cannot pay now due to energy prices already through the roof (gasoline, home heating, plain ol' electricity). Now it's starting to show in the 'credit crunch' that's going on in this country. People in these brackets are having their homes foreclosed. Folks are buying cheap unhealthy processed food from grocery stores (like that article printed last month) and other various assorted problems from lack of money after paying for energy.

It's almost as if the media is writing a story trying to downplay the impact of $100 a barrel oil once this reaches the consumer on a retail level. Oil co's read this stuff and set their prices off this. Just like when gas went over 3.00 a gallon after Katrina. Media writes 'American consumer still buys $3 a gallon gas at same rate' (as if people had a choice).

This is a story in poor taste and the editor should be letting this garbage get out. It certainly doesn't apply for most Americans, just the elite bunch.
Member Since: March 8, 2007 Posts: 273 Comments: 12612
1037. Fshhead
8:41 PM GMT on November 09, 2007
Oil: No longer a heavyweight
Higher efficiency, a more diverse energy mix and a more prosperous nation have softened rising oil's economic punch.

By Steve Hargreaves, CNNMoney.com staff writer
October 30 2007: 2:50 PM EDT
Link
Member Since: November 19, 2005 Posts: 9 Comments: 9960
1036. Fshhead
8:34 PM GMT on November 09, 2007
How to Green Your Car
Link
Member Since: November 19, 2005 Posts: 9 Comments: 9960
1035. Fshhead
8:10 PM GMT on November 08, 2007
Hybrids Come in Many Shapes and Sizes ? and More Are on the WayHonda introduced the first hybrid to America in 1999 ? the Honda Insight, a two-door hatchback with a 60 miles-per-gallon rating. Today, American consumers can choose from among hybrids in several major classes, and by 2008, nearly 25 hybrid models from a dozen carmakers will be on the market.
The models listed below are available in 2006 ? click on the links for manufacturers specifications.

For detailed comparisons of hybrids, visit http://autos.yahoo.com/green_center-fuel_hybrid_cars-cars/

Sedans

Honda Accord Hybrid (4-door), estimated 30 mpg city/37 mpg highway
Honda Civic Hybrid (4-door), estimated 47/48 mpg
Honda Insight Hybrid (2-door hatchback), estimated 61/66 mpg
Lexus GS 450h Hybrid (4-door), estimated 25/28 mpg
Nissan Altima Hybrid (4-door), estimated 42/36 mpg
Toyota Prius Hybrid (4-door hatchback), estimated 60/51 mpg

SUVs

Ford Escape Hybrid, estimated 36/31 mpg http://autos.yahoo.com/2007_ford_escape_hybrid/
Mercury Mariner Hybrid, estimated 33/29 mpg
Lexus RX 400h Hybrid, estimated 30/26 mpg http://autos.yahoo.com/2007_lexus_rx_400h/
Saturn Vue Green Line Hybrid, estimated 27/32 mpg
Toyota Highlander Hybrid, estimated 32/27 mpg

Trucks

Chevrolet Silverado/GMC Sierra Hybrid Pickup, estimated 18/20 mpg

Link
Member Since: November 19, 2005 Posts: 9 Comments: 9960
1033. Fshhead
7:28 AM GMT on November 08, 2007
Michael Kanellos of CNET published a list of electric car making companies he knows of. Here is the list:

Tesla Motors
Wrightspeed
Fisker Automotive
Zap
Miles Automotive
Zenn
AC Propulsion
Phoenix Motorcars
Aptera
Porteon
Lightning
Reva
Ultramotor
Myers Motors
Th!nk
Venture Vehicles
To these were added by her commenters:

Brammo
Silence PT2
Universal Electric Vehicles
Commuter Cars
Hybrid Technologies
Bricklin’s Visionary Vehicles
Link
Member Since: November 19, 2005 Posts: 9 Comments: 9960
1032. Fshhead
8:10 PM GMT on November 07, 2007
Experts warn Fla. about climate change
By BILL KACZOR, Associated Press Writer | Posted Tue Nov 6, 2007

Link
Member Since: November 19, 2005 Posts: 9 Comments: 9960
1031. LowerCal
8:55 AM PST on November 07, 2007
That's a sly one SSI, lol!
Member Since: July 26, 2006 Posts: 58 Comments: 9331
1028. Fshhead
8:00 PM GMT on November 06, 2007
THANX for the update Sully! Does not look good for us at the pump!!!
Member Since: November 19, 2005 Posts: 9 Comments: 9960
1027. sullivanweather
1:47 PM EST on November 06, 2007
Oil hits $97 on bombs, demand prediction By JOHN WILEN, AP Business Writer
1 hour, 41 minutes ago



NEW YORK - Oil futures jumped to a new record above $97 a barrel Tuesday after bombings in Afghanistan and an attack on a Yemeni oil pipeline compounded the supply concerns that have driven crude prices higher in recent weeks.


Those concerns were further fed by a government prediction on Tuesday that domestic oil inventories will fall further this year while consumption rises.

Oil was already up before news of the blasts in northern Afghanistan that killed 64 people and the attack in Yemen. Severe weather forecasts for the North Sea, expectations that domestic crude supplies fell last week and the weak dollar all contributed to the latest move upward.

While Afghanistan doesn't produce much oil, traders watch for the possibility that any escalation in the conflict there between U.S. armed forces and Islamic militants could spill over into other countries, disrupting oil supplies out of the Middle East.

John Kilduff, vice president of risk management at MF Global UK Ltd., noted that the attack in Yemen "has disrupted a pipeline that carries 155,000 barrels a day of crude."

Meanwhile, investors believe crude supplies are declining in the U.S. Analysts surveyed by Dow Jones Newswires predict, on average, that crude oil inventories fell by 1.6 million barrels last week. The Energy Department's Energy Information Administration will issue its weekly inventory report on Wednesday. Oil futures' rise above $90 a barrel has been fueled in part by two weeks of unexpected declines in inventories.

On Tuesday, the EIA predicted oil consumption will rise in the fourth quarter and next year despite higher prices, and that inventories will fall.

"Strong demand, limited surplus capacity, falling inventories and geopolitical concerns continue to weigh on the market," the EIA said in its monthly Short-Term Energy Outlook.

The weak dollar, which fell to a new low against the euro Tuesday, is also lifting oil prices. Oil futures offer a hedge against a weak dollar, and oil futures bought and sold in dollars are more attractive to foreign investors when the greenback is falling.

Light, sweet crude for December delivery rose $2.63 to $96.61 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange Tuesday after earlier rising as high as $97.07, a new trading record.

Other energy futures also rose Tuesday. December gasoline futures jumped 5.52 cents to $2.4363 a gallon on the Nymex, while December heating oil futures added 6.46 cents to $2.6085 a gallon.

Natural gas for December delivery fell 13.8 cents to $7.861 per 1,000 cubic feet on the Nymex on predictions for mild temperatures next week in the Midwest and Northeast, and expectations that inventories, already at record levels, will continue to rise.

In London, Brent crude rose $2.59 to $93.08 a barrel on the ICE Futures exchange. A number of North Sea oil platforms were being evacuated Tuesday in advance of expected severe weather.

At the pump, meanwhile, gas prices continued to rise, following oil's 39 percent price jump since August. The national average price of a gallon of gas jumped 2 cents overnight to $3.024 a gallon, according to AAA and the Oil Price Information Service.

Separately, the EIA reported that diesel fuel prices reached a national average of $3.303 a gallon, a new record.

On Wednesday, analysts also expect the EIA to report that gasoline inventories rose by 200,000 barrels during the week ended Nov. 2, while supplies of distillates, which include heating oil and diesel fuel, fell by 500,000 barrels.

The analysts expect that refinery use grew by 0.8 percentage point to 87 percent of capacity.

Oil inventories likely fell due to a suspension of output at Mexico's state oil company Petroleos Mexicanos, a major crude exporter to the United States, which temporarily shut its ports last week due to severe weather.

"The oil market is really supported by the tight inventories in the U.S. market and the general expectations for the inventory report this week are that the crude inventories will likely fall," said Victor Shum of Purvin & Gertz Inc. in Singapore.

Crude prices are within the range of inflation-adjusted highs set in early 1980. Depending on the how the adjustment is calculated, $38 a barrel then would be worth $96 to $103 or more today.
Member Since: March 8, 2007 Posts: 273 Comments: 12612
1025. Fshhead
7:01 AM GMT on November 06, 2007
Lol no prob' bro no hurry, will be around for a while.
Member Since: November 19, 2005 Posts: 9 Comments: 9960
1024. sullivanweather
1:55 AM EST on November 06, 2007
Awesome bro!!

Lundqvist got his 4th shutout tonight in a 2-0 Rangers victory over the 1st place Flyers.



I'll be on in a little bit...

G/f's using the computer right now and the room the PC is in is WAAAY too cold.
Member Since: March 8, 2007 Posts: 273 Comments: 12612
1023. Fshhead
6:52 AM GMT on November 06, 2007
Yea Sully indeed it was Booth who scored the winning goal. Man what a game,few fights,lot of goals & got a free hat!!! Took some pics of the arena for you, just have to upload them later...
Member Since: November 19, 2005 Posts: 9 Comments: 9960
1022. sullivanweather
11:57 PM EST on November 05, 2007
He shoots...HE SCORESSS!!!!!

DAVID BOOTH PUTS THE PANTHERS AHEAD 4-3 AT 18:41 IN THE THIRD PERIOD!!!
Member Since: March 8, 2007 Posts: 273 Comments: 12612
1020. Fshhead
8:02 PM GMT on November 04, 2007

Click Me!!!!
Member Since: November 19, 2005 Posts: 9 Comments: 9960
1019. Fshhead
7:23 AM GMT on November 04, 2007
Here comes $100 oil, and $3 gas
With crude setting new highs every day, experts say there's no way motorists won't see a spike at the pump.

By Steve Hargreaves, CNNMoney.com staff writer
October 26 2007: 5:16 PM EDT
Link
Member Since: November 19, 2005 Posts: 9 Comments: 9960
1018. Fshhead
7:13 AM GMT on November 04, 2007
California inches toward 300 megawatt solar
plant

Link
Member Since: November 19, 2005 Posts: 9 Comments: 9960
1016. Fshhead
8:53 PM GMT on November 03, 2007
Just a reminder to everyone...
Time change is tonite!!! FALL back an hour..
Member Since: November 19, 2005 Posts: 9 Comments: 9960
1015. Fshhead
7:57 AM GMT on November 03, 2007
Ahhhhh, Dave....
I dont write the articles lol Besides it's common sense to me that we need to get away from fossil fuel use lol So kinda a moog point how many barrels are in the ground.
Member Since: November 19, 2005 Posts: 9 Comments: 9960
1014. robodave
2:59 AM GMT on November 03, 2007
There's over 40 billion barrels of regulated, "untappable" oil within the limits of our country (consevative estimate). There's lots more in the rest of the world that just sits there.

Sustainable oil?

Don't ask me why we're not drilling. Its like asking why people become liberal and why some people jump off bridges.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1010. crucilandia
3:53 PM GMT on November 02, 2007
Orimulsion will help

The bitumen occurs naturally and is obtained from the world's largest deposit in the Orinoco Belt in Venezuela. Reserves are estimated at more than 1.2 million million barrels (190 million m3) of bitumen, an amount greater than 50% of the world's estimated oil reserves

from wikipedia
Member Since: March 6, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 2212
1009. Fshhead
7:11 AM GMT on November 02, 2007
PEAK OIL!!

Civilization as we know it is coming to an end soon. This is not the wacky proclamation of a doomsday cult, apocalypse bible prophecy sect, or conspiracy theory society. Rather, it is the scientific conclusion of the best paid, most widely-respected geologists, physicists, bankers, and investors in the world. These are rational, professional, conservative individuals who are absolutely terrified by a phenomenon known as global "Peak Oil."

"Are We 'Running Out'? I Thought

There Was 40 Years of the Stuff Left"


Oil will not just "run out" because all oil production follows a bell curve. This is true whether we're talking about an individual field, a country, or on the planet as a whole.
Oil is increasingly plentiful on the upslope of the bell curve, increasingly scarce and expensive on the down slope. The peak of the curve coincides with the point at which the endowment of oil has been 50 percent depleted. Once the peak is passed, oil production begins to go down while cost begins to go up.
In practical and considerably oversimplified terms, this means that if 2005 was the year of global Peak Oil, worldwide oil production in the year 2030 will be the same as it was in 1980. However, the world’s population in 2030 will be both much larger (approximately twice) and much more industrialized (oil-dependent) than it was in 1980. Consequently, worldwide demand for oil will outpace worldwide production of oil by a significant margin. As a result, the price will skyrocket, oil dependant economies will crumble, and resource wars will explode.
The issue is not one of "running out" so much as it is not having enough to keep our economy running. In this regard, the ramifications of Peak Oil for our civilization are similar to the ramifications of dehydration for the human body. The human body is 70 percent water. The body of a 200 pound man thus holds 140 pounds of water. Because water is so crucial to everything the human body does, the man doesn't need to lose all 140 pounds of water weight before collapsing due to dehydration. A loss of as little as 10-15 pounds of water may be enough to kill him.
In a similar sense, an oil based economy such as ours doesn't need to deplete its entire reserve of oil before it begins to collapse. A shortfall between demand and supply as little as 10 to 15 percent is enough to wholly shatter an oil-dependent economy and reduce its citizenry to poverty.
The effects of even a small drop in production can be devastating. For instance, during the 1970s oil shocks, shortfalls in production as small as 5% caused the price of oil to nearly quadruple. The same thing happened in California a few years ago with natural gas: a production drop of less than 5% caused prices to skyrocket by 400%.
Fortunately, those price shocks were only temporary.
The coming oil shocks won't be so short lived. They represent the onset of a new, permanent condition. Once the decline gets under way, production will drop (conservatively) by 3% per year, every year. War, terrorism, extreme weather and other "above ground" geopolitical factors will likely push the effective decline rate past 10% per year, thus cutting the total supply by 50% in 7 years. (Source)
These estimate comes from numerous sources, not the least of which is Vice President Dick Cheney himself. In a 1999 speech he gave while still CEO of Halliburton, Cheney stated:
By some estimates, there will be an average of two-percent
annual growth in global oil demand over the years ahead,
along with, conservatively, a three-percent natural decline
in production from existing reserves.That means by 2010 we
will need an additional 50 million barrels per day.
Cheney's assesement is supported by the estimates of numerous non-political, retired, and now disinterested scientists, many of whom believe global oil production will peak and go into terminal decline within the next five years. Many industry insiders think the decline rate will far higher than Cheney predicted in 1999. Andrew Gould, CEO of the giant oil services firm Schlumberger, for instance, recently explained:
An accurate average decline rate is hard to estimate, but an
overall figure of 8% is not an unreasonable assumption.
An 8% yearly decline would cut global oil production by a whopping 50% in under nine years. If a 5% cut in production caused prices to triple in the 1970s, what do you think a 50% cut is going to do?
Other experts are predicting decline rates as high as 10% to 13%. Some geologists now believe 2005 was the last year of the cheap-oil bonanza, while many estimates coming out of the oil industry indicate "a seemingly unbridgeable supply/demand gap opening up after 2007," which will lead to major fuel shortages and increasingly severe blackouts beginning around 2008-2012. As we slide down the downslope slope of the global oil production curve, we may find ourselves slipping into what some scientists are already calling the coming "post industrial stone age."
Link

Hmmm, heard an interview with this guy...
This is his website & the story is quite long lol Much more to it than what I posted...
Member Since: November 19, 2005 Posts: 9 Comments: 9960
1008. Fshhead
6:34 AM GMT on November 02, 2007
An Electric Dream
THE $98,000 Tesla Roadster aims to be the ultimate green car. Will it succeed?


Speed Racer: Tesla cofounder Eberhard hopes to electrify the luxury-sports-car market
By Keith Naughton | NEWSWEEK
Oct 29, 2007 Issue

Inside a messy garage on a side street in the unglamorous Silicon Valley suburb of San Carlos, David Lu is struggling to make the shift to the future of transportation. The 25-year-old engineer taps away at a laptop, while behind him technicians crawl over a sinewy yellow sports car with a jumble of wires spilling from its carbon-fiber body. They're trying to work the bugs out of the transmission for this high-speed racer. "How the transmission handles, is still a subject of debate," says Lu. But something's different in this monster garage. On the walls, big yellow and red signs warn: DANGER: HIGH VOLTAGE. And the car has a thick black electrical plug sticking into it. This two-seat hot rod—which slingshots from 0 to 60 in less than 4 seconds—is powered by the same batteries as Lu's laptop. And what's even more shocking: This automotive antidote to our oil addiction does not come from a big car company. It is the work of Tesla Motors, a Silicon Valley start-up with 250 employees. Maybe you caught a glimpse of the Tesla Roadster making a cameo at the end of last year's documentary, "Who Killed the Electric Car?"

Or maybe you heard that celebrities like George Clooney and Matt Damon already have put down deposits on this $98,000 road rocket. Or perhaps you know that Silicon Valley A-listers like the Google guys are Tesla investors. Even Detroit, long derided as environmental knuckle draggers, is showing respect for tiny Tesla. "They have a real shot at success," says GM car czar Bob Lutz, who credits Tesla's arrival with jump-starting GM's plans to build its Chevy Volt plug-in hybrid electric car coming in 2010. "Their Roadster, if and when fully reliable, is an extremely attractive proposition."
That "if and when" is proving problematic. This green machine was originally due to hit the road this month. But that tricky transmission and other mundane issues for major automakers—like crash-testing the cars—are taking longer than the neophyte auto moguls expected. It now looks like customers won't get their cars until early next year. "I had a friend cancel his order because he didn't want to wait," says Chris Paine, the director of "Who Killed the Electric Car?" who still has his deposit down.

Some critics see Tesla as woefully underfunded with $105 million in start-up money, from a variety of Valley players like Jeff Skoll, eBay's original president, and the Technology Partners venture capital fund. The car business, the auto analysts warn, takes billions, not millions. All the delays have editors of auto-buff magazines wondering if Tesla is for real. "Until they have a drivable car, everything else is just flapping their jaws," says Car and Driver editor Csaba Csere, who's been awaiting a promised test drive for months. Tesla's overwhelmed executives hope everyone will be patient as they work through a long list of tests and tweaks. "Everybody will tell you that starting a car company is really hard," says Tesla's intense 47-year-old cofounder Martin Eberhard. "And they're right."

You could fill a junkyard with the magnificent failures in automotive history. There's Preston Tucker, who built just 51 of his ahead-of-its-time eponymous model in the 1940s, and then in the 1980s there was John DeLorean's gull-winged sports car, which is best remembered as a movie prop. But electric vehicles have proved a car conundrum that has confounded giants from Thomas Edison to General Motors. Guzzling gasoline, while environmentally incorrect, has always been cheaper and easier than propelling pollution-free in an electric car, with its balky batteries, limited driving range and endless recharging time. In the '90s, those factors helped short-circuit GM's EV1, whose ignominious death was the subject of Paine's documentary. Nearly a century ago, Edison was so frustrated by the failure of his electric car that he wrote a note of surrender on a napkin over dinner with Henry Ford. "The electric car," Edison wrote, "is dead."

What makes Tesla—named for the inventor of alternating current—any different? For starters, Tesla's timing may be perfect. Ever since Al Gore let us in on the inconvenient truth, the idea of an electric vehicle has emerged as the purest play against global warming, since cars spit out 20 percent of the greenhouse gases that heat the planet. Plus, Tesla's founders and financiers created a compelling car that blends Silicon Valley smarts with the kind of pulse-pounding performance that earnest, eat-your-peas electric cars always lacked. They're powering their car with a 950-pound bundle of 6,831 lithium-ion cells, each about the size of a AA battery, which come from a device these Valley boys know something about—a laptop computer. Lithium ion is the new battery of choice for electric cars—Toyota and GM are looking at it—because it goes farther on a charge (Tesla claims well over 200 miles) and doesn't take as long to juice up (about 3.5 hours with a special garage charger, or seven hours with a conventional plug). And all this technology is wrapped in a curvaceous car based on the exotic Elise by boutique British carmaker Lotus, which is building the Roadster for Tesla in Hethel, England. The first year's production of 600 cars is sold out.
Link

Really long article, pretty much lays it on the line... There are a couple more pages just follow the link. The highlighted parts are funny cause it is what I have been saying. I knew the Volt was pushed into production because of the Tesla Roadster. lol Also like I have said ALL along, the timing of this car is PERFECT!!!!! Oil prices going through the roof, the danger of peak oil & the wars that are & will be fought over it......
Member Since: November 19, 2005 Posts: 9 Comments: 9960
1007. Fshhead
6:09 AM GMT on November 02, 2007
Software expert Shai Agassi plans to jumpstart electric car sector
By Aurelia End | Posted Thu Nov 1, 2007 5:33am
Link

As far as the last statement in the article?
Hmmmm we will see about that lol
Member Since: November 19, 2005 Posts: 9 Comments: 9960
1006. Trouper415
4:43 PM GMT on November 01, 2007
Lots of good things are happening and growing my friends :)

Thank you all
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1005. Fshhead
7:01 AM GMT on November 01, 2007
Some before & after pics of glaciers & signs of global warming from around the world. Very nicely done. That Pasterze glacier has been debated quite a few times here lol It is the one above all by itself in the header. That one is scary to say the least!
Link
Member Since: November 19, 2005 Posts: 9 Comments: 9960
1004. Fshhead
6:50 AM GMT on November 01, 2007
Solar energy boom may help world's poorest
Link
Member Since: November 19, 2005 Posts: 9 Comments: 9960
1001. sullivanweather
6:53 AM GMT on October 31, 2007
Moderate earthquake shakes Bay Area By RON HARRIS, Associated Press Writer
9 minutes ago



SAN JOSE, Calif. - A magnitude-5.6 earthquake shook the San Francisco Bay area Tuesday night, rattling homes and nerves, but there were no immediate reports of serious damage or injuries.

The moderate temblor struck shortly after 8 p.m., about 9 miles northeast of San Jose, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Residents reported feeling the quake as far east as Sacramento and as far north as Sonoma.

The California Highway Patrol has received no reports of damage or injuries, spokesman Tom Marshall said.

It was the strongest tremor in the Bay Area since 1989, when a magnitude-7.1 quake killed 62 people.

The epicenter of the quake was near Alum Rock, in the Diablo Range foothills east of San Jose — not far from the home of San Jose Mayor Chuck Reed.

Pictures fell off the walls of Reed's house, but the mayor said there was no major damage there.

"It was a pretty strong ride here, a lot of shaking but nothing broken," Reed told The Associated Press in a phone interview from his home. "I've talked to a few people and we have no reports of injuries or damage. There was a lot of shaking, but it wasn't the big one."

Amrit Shergill, a night cashier at Alum Rock Shell gasoline station in San Jose, said there was no damage other than some small items that toppled off a shelf — but the intensity of the shaking sent her outside and crouching on the sidewalk.

"My God, I felt like running because the roof might come down on my head," said Shergill, who was born in India. "I've never felt anything like this in 16 years in the United States."

Rod Foo, a resident of south San Jose, about 10 miles from the epicenter, said everything in his house shook for several seconds, but the electricity never went out and his telephone was still working.

"I could hear it coming up the street before it hit the house," said Foo, a former reporter with the San Jose Mercury News. "I thought it was the kids messing around at first, then I felt the house shaking and I knew it was an earthquake. ... It was rattling for a long time and really loud."

The USGS reported 10 aftershocks, the biggest with a preliminary magnitude of 2.1.

In downtown San Jose, the quake caused a pipe to break, streaming water into the parking garage of a condo building, according to the Mercury News.

An employee at Beverages and More, a liquor store in Milpitas, a few miles from the epicenter, reported a few broken wine bottles.

Allison Guimard, 25, a technology executive who lives in Mountain View, about 18 miles west of the epicenter, said her china started shaking and she grabbed her dog. It was the first significant earthquake for Guimard and her husband, Pierre, who moved here from New York six months ago.

"It felt like the apartment was rolling — shaking and rolling," said Pierre Guimard, 25, a home entertainment installer. "Almost like a boat on the water."

Bob Redding, a dispatcher at the California Highway Patrol dispatch center in the Central Valley town of Atwater, 70 miles east of the epicenter, said the office had received calls from numerous locations in the valley, but CHP had received no reports of injuries.

"When it first hit, we thought a truck might have hit our building," Redding said. "But it was just one jerk."

A representative of Caltrain, which runs light rail between Silicon Valley and San Francisco, said all trains were stopped as soon as the earthquake hit, and they've been running at restricted speeds ever since. There were no reports of injuries or other problems. The trains were expected to remain in service until midnight.

A spokesman for the Bay Area Rapid Transit District, which runs underground and aboveground trains throughout the region, said all trains were stopped soon after 8 p.m. for five minutes. Train operators were then instructed to run trains at half their normal speed, and look out the windows and perform track inspections at every stop.

"There's no damage so far and we're not anticipating any," said BART spokesman Linton Johnson. He said trains were running five to seven minutes behind schedule but were expected to get back on schedule later Tuesday evening.

The magnitude-7.1 quake in October 1989 struck just before the third game of the World Series at Candlestick Park. The quake, centered in the Santa Cruz Mountains on the San Andreas fault, caused nearly $3 billion in damage.

Aaron McLear, a spokesman for Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, said the state would "will review and inspect all important infrastructure," including levees in the coming days.

Earthquakes powerful enough to be felt through the Central Valley have been of increasing concern since Hurricane Katrina because of their potential to weaken the earthen levees that channel rivers throughout the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.
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