Frigid Start to March and Plenty of Snow Systems

By: BwalshNLWeather , 11:51 PM GMT on February 26, 2014

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Good evening,

While the first day of Spring is just 3 weeks away, there are no signs of an improvement in the cold weather that has been settled over the province for the past several weeks. In fact, most long range guidance is showing all of Central and Eastern Canada plunging into an Arctic deep freeze through the first 10-14 days of March. A number of low pressure systems will affect the Island through next week, and with cold air in place, all precipitation is likely to be in the form of snow.

The first low to affect the Island will primarily be an Avalon system on Thursday. With a track well east of the Avalon, the heaviest snowfall will remain offshore. Light snow begins overnight (4-6 AM) across the Avalon, tapering to flurries near noon. Snow will be light and fluffy, due to the cold temperatures in place, and the highest amounts will be over the Southeastern Avalon (Ferryland, Trepassey) where 15 cm is possible.

Snowfall amounts on Thursday:
NW Avalon: 4-7 cm
St. John’s/Metro and SW Avalon: 7-10 cm
SE Avalon: 10-15 cm

Another low quickly moves across Central Newfoundland on Friday. Light snow will spread across the Island overnight Thursday into Friday morning and will persist through the day. The heaviest snowfall looks to fall over Western Newfoundland (west of the low’s track) where 10-15 cm is expected.

Snowfall amounts on Friday:
Avalon Peninsula: 2-5 cm
Burin/Bonavista Peninsulas: 5-10 cm
Central Newfoundland: 10 cm
Western Newfoundland: 10-15 cm

As the low moves off the Northeast coast of Newfoundland late Friday, it will rapidly deepen and very strong westerly winds develop across Eastern Newfoundland Friday afternoon into the evening with gusts likely up to 110 km/h, including the St. John’s/Metro region.

In behind Friday’s system, very cold air will rush onto the Island for Saturday with temperatures mainly below -10 across Newfoundland through the day and wind chill values near, or below, -20. Skies will be fair on Saturday, but definitely a bitterly cold day.

The next system arrives on Sunday, tracking from west to east across the Island. The low looks to bring a general 5-10 cm of snow to all parts of Newfoundland. Some areas, particularly along the South Coast, may receive up to 15 cm through the day Sunday. With a track across the Island, temperatures will warm up to just below seasonal on Sunday, particularly in the south and east where temperatures may rise up to near zero.

Another break in the weather for Monday with a mix of sun and cloud, but a return to frigid, well below normal, temperatures is expected.

Yet another low looks to track near, or offshore of, Eastern Newfoundland on Tuesday. Significant snowfall is possible, along with gusty winds and the system needs to be watched.

The biggest theme for next week across Newfoundland and Labrador will be the frigid temperatures, particularly over Labrador. Values at least 10 degrees below normal are expected across the province next week, and a return to bitter wind chills (minus 25 and below) for many areas.

Labrador will see very little snow over the next week to 10 days, but temperatures in the minus 20 to minus 30 degree range continue through the end of next week, with wind chill values consistently between minus 35 and minus 45.

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About BwalshNLWeather

Operations Manager and Meteorologist with Ice & Environmental Services at Provincial Aerospace Ltd. I've been weather forecasting since 2000.

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