Road Less Traveled to Mt St Helens

By: BriarCraft , 9:58 PM GMT on July 13, 2012

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In May, we traveled to Mt St Helens from the west, along the Toutle River to Johnston Ridge Observatory. That approach offered sweeping vistas of the old lahar flows that changed the Toutle River forever. We got to look almost straight into the crater, but we didn't get to see Spirit Lake, only about 5 miles away. To do that requires some rugged hiking for the direct route or a drive of about 130 miles. Not practical for a simple day trip.

Heading east on US Highway 12 past Mossyrock and Morton to Randle, it was apparent that the late arrival of summer had delayed hay harvests. It seemed that farmers everywhere were making hay as fast as they could.


Traveling along with Cowlitz River for part of the way, the waters of Riffe Lake reflected the blue sky so closely that I just had to stop to take a picture. Mossyrock Dam is the tallest dam in the State of Washington at 606 feet from bedrock. Riffe (rhymes with "life") Lake, named for a community it covered, has 52 miles of shoreline and is 23 miles long and is a popular spot for boating and fishing.


Although I didn't know it when I set out for the east side of Mt St Helens, the trek to Windy Ridge would not have been possible back in May. In fact, it would not have been possible before July 12, the day I went there. Officially, Forest Roads 25 and 99 did not open until July 13, but they were ready to travel by the afternoon of the 12th. Landslides had blocked both Forest Roads, requiring a new bridge to be built.


After leaving US-12 at Randle, there are no services available along the way -- no food, no gas, no water, no cell phone reception. There are a few chemical toilets provided by the Forest Service, but that's it. Forest Road 25 winds through dense forests, then Forest Road 99 climbs the foothills surrounding Mt St Helens to Windy Ridge viewpoint. In several places, the road dips sharply where the soil beneath has slid or sunk. Rather than filling in these large dips, the Forest Service has simply patched pavement to make the drop-offs a bit more manageable. If you're not paying attention, it is very easy to hit one of these too fast and damage your car. So, while the scenery is nice, it doesn't make for a relaxing drive.

Unlike the western approach, there are no interpretive centers as you approach the mountain from the northeast. There are half a dozen viewpoints with small parking lots and there are several wide spots in the road where one can pull over briefly for a quick look and perhaps to snap a photo. Since the road was not yet officially open and there was little traffic, I was able to stop here and there for a few seconds to snap a quick shot from the driver's seat.

8.5 miles from Mt St Helens, this 1972 Pontiac Grand Prix was left undisturbed after the eruption. The picture at top is from a Forest Service sign at the site, showing how it looked in 1980. The bottom picture is what it looks like today.


At the end of the line, Windy Ridge, there are 361 steps to reach the official viewpoint. A few brave souls actually make that climb, braving strong winds, no hand rails, and steps that aren't spaced quite right for comfortable climbing. I didn't even try. Going up is hard on quadriceps and hips. Coming down is really tough on knees. Even young, athletic types are seen stopping every 50 or 100 steps to rest.


Below are some of the photos I took along the way. If you want to see more, there are 26 photos in the series.

inside the blast zone (BriarCraft)
Some trees that were somewhat shielded by ridges managed to hold on to some their bark during Mt St Helens' 1980 eruption.
inside the blast zone
inside the blast zone (BriarCraft)
Unstable soils cause the road to dip and crumble in many places. A landslide blocked part of Forest Road 99 until July 12. Denuded tree trunks still stand all around.
inside the blast zone
inside the blast zone (BriarCraft)
Lush greenery and young trees grow amidst the snags left from Mt St Helens' 1980 eruption.
inside the blast zone
like so many matchsticks (BriarCraft)
Even after 32 years, there still are some places where there is little greenery to distract from the deadfall within the blast zone of Mt St Helens.
like so many matchsticks
Mt Adams (BriarCraft)
Rugged terrain between Mt St Helens and Mt Adams to the east.
Mt Adams
Spirit Lake (BriarCraft)
Spirit Lake is about 200 feet deeper than it was before the 1980 eruption of Mt St Helens. Thousands of tree trunks still float on the surface of the lake 32 years after the blast.
Spirit Lake
Spirit Lake eruption debris (BriarCraft)
Here's a close-up of some of the thousands of tree trunks still floating in Spirit Lake at the foot of Mt St Helens.
Spirit Lake eruption debris
Smith Creek vista (BriarCraft)
If you look closely, you can see a bit of Smith Creek in the lower center. This is the view looking east from Windy Ridge at Mt St Helens.
Smith Creek vista
Mt St Helens (BriarCraft)
View from Forest Road 99 on the northeast side of the mountain.
Mt St Helens
Mt St Helens (BriarCraft)
View from the northeast, about 7 miles from the volcano.
Mt St Helens
Mt St Helens lava dome (BriarCraft)
This perspective shows the profile of the lava dome inside the crater, as seen from northeast of the volcano.
Mt St Helens lava dome
Windy Ridge view (BriarCraft)
This is the view from the parking lot at Windy Ridge, 4 miles from the crater of Mt St Helens.
Windy Ridge view
wildflowers (BriarCraft)
Wildflowers seen near Mt St Helens. Center is foxglove. Lower left is wild strawberry. Don't know the names of the others
wildflowers

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70. WatchinTheSky
5:23 PM GMT on August 05, 2012
Hey BC! Sounds like some toasty weather made it up your way for a few days. Hope you are off on another cool road trip - or at least outside enjoying the weather.
Member Since: September 20, 2005 Posts: 133 Comments: 2162
69. sandiquiz
4:18 PM GMT on August 05, 2012
I haven't been circulating much for the last four days, but it appears you haven't either.

Hope all is well, and you are just getting on top of all that weed whacking!
Member Since: October 29, 2005 Posts: 301 Comments: 27127
68. Ylee
2:51 PM GMT on August 05, 2012
Under 60? I'd be wearing woolen union suits if it was that cool here! ;-)

Hope life's treating you well!
Member Since: February 3, 2011 Posts: 98 Comments: 16622
67. Bogon
2:19 PM GMT on August 05, 2012
I heard a report that summer was finally headed your way. Better late than never.

Ha, the temperature reported in your sidebar is 59.8°. I can't even remember the last time it was that cool here.
Member Since: June 26, 2008 Posts: 80 Comments: 3885
66. GardenGrrl
9:13 PM GMT on August 04, 2012
Hey where you at? Watchin the Olympics

Member Since: March 25, 2007 Posts: 260 Comments: 10018
65. Ylee
7:16 AM GMT on August 02, 2012
A belated white rabbits x 3, Briar!
Member Since: February 3, 2011 Posts: 98 Comments: 16622
64. GardenGrrl
3:11 AM GMT on August 02, 2012
It has been sooooo hot here (107f). The only thing still blooming are the pentas. I'm down to five. They get baked. Wilt, curl and look to be lost causes, but given water they revive and flower.
Member Since: March 25, 2007 Posts: 260 Comments: 10018
63. Proserpina
10:33 AM GMT on August 01, 2012
Photobucket
Member Since: May 6, 2008 Posts: 178 Comments: 18460
62. sandiquiz
7:11 AM GMT on August 01, 2012


Wishing you a very happy and weather safe month!
Member Since: October 29, 2005 Posts: 301 Comments: 27127
61. sandiquiz
8:35 AM GMT on July 31, 2012
I think the drama lecturer just had a wild imagination, and liked to make the first year students' life difficult! lol

I had another look for the definition of eccentric and found a British expression.... "barmy as a crumpet"!
I thought it apt for your blog after you made crumpets! lol

Member Since: October 29, 2005 Posts: 301 Comments: 27127
60. BriarCraft
11:49 PM GMT on July 30, 2012
Somehow, I think there might be more than a few eccentrics wandering around WUville...

Sandi: What a strange lecturer! Was that eccentric? Or psychotic? From what I've heard: neurotic people make up fantasy worlds; psychotics live in them!

Ylee: That is absolutely priceless and I can certainly picture you doing that now, if you went back to school now. Somehow, like Sandi, I can't picture an 18-year-old kid doing that.
Member Since: June 21, 2004 Posts: 88 Comments: 4444
59. sandiquiz
4:49 PM GMT on July 30, 2012
Oh, Ylee... if only we had dared! Mind you 18 year olds in 1967 were not made of the same stuff they are today! lol
Member Since: October 29, 2005 Posts: 301 Comments: 27127
58. Ylee
4:42 PM GMT on July 30, 2012
If the drama prof handed me the reins, I would gladly thank her and wait until she left, then head off to the cafeteria. If she tracked me down there, and asked me where her horse was, I would finish chewing and swallowing my hamburger, look her straight in the eye, and with all seriousness say,
I'm eating it!" That'll either get you an A, or thrown out of class, lol!
Member Since: February 3, 2011 Posts: 98 Comments: 16622
57. sandiquiz
11:28 AM GMT on July 30, 2012
Good morning to you.

No, I agree with you about eccentricity not being age related. When I was at college we had a drama lecturer whom we were all a little afraid of. She would wander down the main college corridor looking for unwilling slaves. She would stop you and ask you to hold her horse, handing over imaginary reins, which you had to accept. The unwilling "horse-holder" was then expected to stand there, holding the reins, until she returned... and woe betide if you didn't! As you can imagine there was a great exodus from the corridor if she was seen to be about!
Member Since: October 29, 2005 Posts: 301 Comments: 27127
56. BriarCraft
4:43 AM GMT on July 30, 2012
YCD: There's nothing like a lively jig to brighten one's day. Especially as it accompanies Pros's Swallowtail. Thanks so much for finding that and posting it here.

And no, I would not want my router to have an eccentric orbit! That's too scary to even consider.

Sandi: As to eccentricity, I don't think age has anything to do with it, except possibly in perfecting the art form. Borrowing from Wiki, here's what I mean by eccentricity:

Eccentricity is often associated with genius, intellectual giftedness, or creativity. The individual's eccentric behavior is perceived to be the outward expression of their unique intelligence or creative impulse. In this vein, the eccentric's habits are incomprehensible not because they are illogical or the result of madness, but because they stem from a mind so original that it cannot be conformed to societal norms. English utilitarian thinker John Stuart Mill wrote that "the amount of eccentricity in a society has generally been proportional to the amount of genius, mental vigour, and moral courage which it contained", and mourned a lack of eccentricity as "the chief danger of the time". Edith Sitwell wrote that eccentricity is "often a kind of innocent pride", also saying that geniuses and aristocrats are called eccentrics because "they are entirely unafraid of and uninfluenced by the opinions and vagaries of the crowd".


Quoting Ggrrl: Oh the reason I came by was that while watching the Olympic basketball, the camera shows the top of the hoop ring. Written on the rim it says; Inspiring A generation.
That just seemed like something you would come up with.

{{{Thank you very much}}}

Try stuffing a tomato with your tuna salad sometime. Or pop a Tuna Melt under the broiler for a minute.

Member Since: June 21, 2004 Posts: 88 Comments: 4444
55. ycd0108
6:31 PM GMT on July 29, 2012
#54 Morning:
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 187 Comments: 4743
54. Proserpina
1:48 PM GMT on July 29, 2012
Photobucket
Member Since: May 6, 2008 Posts: 178 Comments: 18460
53. GardenGrrl
10:13 PM GMT on July 28, 2012
YCD- eccentric bearings LOLO
Hi Briar, Am tempted to get some fresh canned tuna. I only eat canned tuna or salmon when it's hot out. Otherwise cant stand fish but cold tuna salad with chopped pecans and crisp lettuce is really good indoors with A/C.

Oh the reason I came by was that while watching the Olympic basketball, the camera shows the top of the hoop ring. Written on the rim it says; Inspiring A generation.
That just seemed like something you would come up with.
Member Since: March 25, 2007 Posts: 260 Comments: 10018
52. sandiquiz
8:52 PM GMT on July 28, 2012
Quoting BriarCraft:
YCD: Maturity is for old fogies. Try for eccentricity instead -- it's a lot more fun. And it is an art form, if you practice enough to get really good at it.

I prefer to call it "experience" :-)
Eccentricity is for octogenarians, I feel ... and I have still a way to go to get there! lol
Member Since: October 29, 2005 Posts: 301 Comments: 27127
51. ycd0108
8:32 PM GMT on July 28, 2012
Are you kidding? If I was more eccentric my bearings would fail. Some of the tools I work with run at 23,000 RPM.
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 187 Comments: 4743
50. BriarCraft
7:55 PM GMT on July 28, 2012
YCD: Maturity is for old fogies. Try for eccentricity instead -- it's a lot more fun. And it is an art form, if you practice enough to get really good at it.
Member Since: June 21, 2004 Posts: 88 Comments: 4444
49. ycd0108
4:10 PM GMT on July 28, 2012
Good morning BriarCraft:
I was reading the link you posted over at Bogon's place and I thought: "It's been a while since I said hello to BC."
So I came here and checked comments and there I was: Not.
I have appreciated all your photos of Mt. St. Helens but it seems I have not commented.
Hello.
I'm pretty sure I had read the story you linked for Bogon but the re read was interesting.
Maybe I'll "Take a swipe at maturity between adolescence and senility" someday.
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 187 Comments: 4743
48. BriarCraft
11:51 PM GMT on July 26, 2012
Poppy: Jack rabbits and gophers seem to have cast iron stomachs. I don't think anything would poison them.

----------------------

Any readers within driving distance of the Washington coast, I got email notification that albacore are now available at Westport's Seafood Connection for $2.59 a pound, plus $3 per fish to have it filleted. I'll be going to get mine for home canning sometime between now and the end of August. It is so much better than the commercially canned stuff, you wouldn't believe it. If you're not within driving distance and/or don't want to bother canning your own, they sell and ship home-style canned premium albacore that is worth every penny. If you really want a treat, their smoked albacore is really special. This is not a paid advertisement, but rather an endorsement from a happy customer.
Member Since: June 21, 2004 Posts: 88 Comments: 4444
47. calpoppy
9:57 PM GMT on July 26, 2012
It us funny how some critters stay away from foxglove and delphinium out here they eat it down to the roots. Plus gophers out here eat oleander roots. The jacks will ch ew on the oleander here also. You would think you would find the little bodies strewn about after a night of feasting on poisinous plants!
Member Since: February 18, 2008 Posts: 57 Comments: 4034
46. BriarCraft
8:48 PM GMT on July 26, 2012
Ylee: Digitalis is an old herbal remedy and derivatives are used for some types of heart failure. As with many medicines, incorrect use can be poisonous. Animals seem to know better than to mess with foxglove.

----------------

NASA's Earth Observatory captured an interesting cloud view. To me, it looks like hoarfrost on a window. It has nothing to do with what's been going on in this blog, but I thought it was worth sharing.


Okay, so the image was here for awhile, then disappeared. If it doesn't appear above, here's the direct link.
Member Since: June 21, 2004 Posts: 88 Comments: 4444
45. Ylee
3:17 AM GMT on July 26, 2012
I used usa.gov to look up foxglove, and besides the photo of it was an article about poisoning to people who eat the leaves and stems and suck the flowers.

Did you know the foxglove is used for heart medicine? (digitalis glycoside)
Member Since: February 3, 2011 Posts: 98 Comments: 16622
44. BriarCraft
11:54 PM GMT on July 25, 2012
Patti and Ggrrl: Would you believe that I've tried starting foxglove from seed with no luck, but this year, one actually volunteered by an old, rotting stump. Actually, it had to have volunteered last year and I just didn't recognize it. They're a biennial and only blossom the second year.

Ggrrl: Medical procedures, surgical or otherwise, are a crap shoot. There are never any guarantees. You certainly had a "this is gonna be tough and recovery tougher" procedure that ended with a great outcome. What matters most is the result, even if it doesn't seem like it at the time.
Member Since: June 21, 2004 Posts: 88 Comments: 4444
43. GardenGrrl
10:02 AM GMT on July 25, 2012
Good Morning. Isn't there some certain irony when doctors say, "This surgery is very simple and you'll be doing cartwheels in no time." Then the person has "rare" life threatening complications.
Glad that your,"this is gonna be tough and recovery tougher" surgery has gone so well. (Knock on wood.)
It is hot here and I'm ready to come visit the cooler mountains out west.
Btw, have to agree with Patti, WILD foxglove, how cool is that.
Member Since: March 25, 2007 Posts: 260 Comments: 10018
42. redagainPatti
3:04 AM GMT on July 25, 2012
Hey Darling, thanks for dropping by my little blog.
Love your photos.. man.. it is so unfair that foxglove grows wild over there... down here in my yard, I could never get it to live down here.. I love those foxglove flowers.
Hope you all have a good week!
Member Since: July 10, 2005 Posts: 123 Comments: 1520
41. BriarCraft
11:47 PM GMT on July 24, 2012
brintcorb: Welcome to WUville! Glad you enjoyed tagging along with us to Mt St Helens.

Poppy: Strange that your friend had no movement restrictions after surgery. Maybe her surgery wasn't as extensive??? The reason for movement restrictions is to give the ligaments time to heal as they had to be severed when the ball joint was replaced. Then again, mine was more severe than average in that I had developed cysts in the pelvis that had to be removed and filled in with bone grafts. Her experience just goes to show that any surgery can have complications. It sounds like she's lucky to be alive.
Member Since: June 21, 2004 Posts: 88 Comments: 4444
40. calpoppy
2:21 PM GMT on July 24, 2012
Hi Briar! I had a former landscape client of mine come into the nursery on Saturday, she is recovering from dual hip replacement surgery. Just a month ago! I thought you might be interested in the technique they used. They did not cut through any muscle, just pulled them apart enough to get through, she had no restrictions in movement after the surgery. The very, very bad thing that happened to her, were many blood clots that went to her brain and her lungs. 5 days in the ICU, they flushed her brain with steroids and basically saved her life. This is a very, very rare occurrence! But I was impressed at the no restrictions! She had arthritis in both hips, and she can't be over 50.

Fresh raspberries, sounds so good. I get to eat the berries off of the plants I haven't sold yet. I don't usually get to many, people see those ripe berries and buy them quickly. I am still getting blueberries off these amazing bushes at home and had my first ripe fig of the season this morning.

Have a great week, Briar!
Member Since: February 18, 2008 Posts: 57 Comments: 4034
39. brintcorb
3:58 AM GMT on July 24, 2012
wow what a great blog entry!

I studied the mt st helens eruption for a minors thesis. I took my wife there 10 years ago (from the east) and still was blown away with the power of that event. the approach from the west was and still is very difficult. thank you for documenting your journey.

signed--

Dr. brinton corb, Sc.D.
Member Since: July 24, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
38. BriarCraft
8:32 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
Pros: Swallowtails and Coneflowers make for a perfect mid-summer collage. Thanks!

Sandi: Talking of aching... Twenty years ago, or even ten, I used to enjoy the slight muscle ache the day after some unusual exertion. It felt good twice, the feel of renewed muscle tone and the pride of accomplishment. Now, it only feels good once... I still get the pride of accomplishment. As to the other, there's nothing like a good hot soak.
Member Since: June 21, 2004 Posts: 88 Comments: 4444
37. sandiquiz
6:46 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
I haven't been around for a few days, as I went north to vist - check up on - my aunt.
Finally summer had arrived, for this week at least!
It made it up to low 80's today and tomorrow should be even warmer.

I read you have been weed wacking - take it easy, don't do too much, although I am sure you have sense to stop if you feel you have done enough or ache.

Talking of aching, I am looking forward to a leisurely hot bath tonight. I am repairing my decking so had to unscrew eight of the planks. My shoulders ache even though I had the help of an electric screwdriver attachment on a drill.

Take care


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36. Proserpina
3:18 PM GMT on July 22, 2012
Photobucket
Member Since: May 6, 2008 Posts: 178 Comments: 18460
35. BriarCraft
10:34 PM GMT on July 21, 2012
Karen: I enjoyed your Tahoe trip, too! As to the snow, it was an odd year for the mountains with early snow and late snow and not a lot in between.

Ylee: So far, we've just been eating fresh raspberries with milk. Eventually (maybe) we'll get tired of that and I'll freeze some.

Ggrrl: You're just full of great news. Best, of course, is the PET scan results, but paying off your house is great, too. I think you're wise to give yourselves a little reward, but then sock away the rest. You won't miss it and it's a good thing to have something set aside. When I think of smart phones, I think there are some cool things you can do with them, but they are so expensive to use I simply can't justify the expense. Regardless, you deserve a little frivolity. Enjoy!
Member Since: June 21, 2004 Posts: 88 Comments: 4444
34. GardenGrrl
4:31 PM GMT on July 21, 2012
Hey Briarcraft,
yeah I know what you mean about trying to balance doing stuff and getting to the blogs...and just about everything else after taking care of responsibilites.
Sounds like your hip recovery is going great. Please don't push the envelope though.
We finally paid off the house so this afternoon we are going shopping for a "smart phone". The idea is to put what we normally paid for the house payment into savings each month, minus what a smart phone package will cost.

I like the idea of GPS, Google maps and some of the useful apps they have for traveling. For a price can also download the Audubon field guides to everything. That would be awesome for hiking and bird-watching.
Did you know there is also a free ap for loading the floor plan of your house (dimensions, furniture etc) and a measuring tape. That way if you are out and see someting big you like you can see if it will fit in the house.

The plans are unbelievably expensive for internet use. Really going to have to shop and research.
Member Since: March 25, 2007 Posts: 260 Comments: 10018
33. Ylee
2:08 AM GMT on July 21, 2012
I thought I posted yesterday! Oh well, anyway, I'm so proud of you for all that you've accomplished since the surgery. Heck, I'm not sure if I can get up from kneeling without a lot of effort! :)

Carry on; let us know how the berry picking turns out!
Member Since: February 3, 2011 Posts: 98 Comments: 16622
32. SBKaren
3:23 AM GMT on July 20, 2012
Hi BC - Oh you went! I love your great descriptions and the wonderful photos. That old rusted car is a hoot. I can't believe all the snow that is still on the mountains. I'm amazed at the number of tree trunks in that lake too.

As you know, we just returned from Lake Tahoe and there isn't white anywhere - not even at the highest elevations or deepest shadows! Did you have a better than normal winter? We had a poor winter - snow wise.
Member Since: February 21, 2005 Posts: 197 Comments: 14655
31. BriarCraft
12:24 AM GMT on July 20, 2012
Sandi: That sounds like the 30th anniversary program broadcast here two years ago. I clearly remember that gopher pushing dirt up through the ash to provide a toe-hold for seeds to sprout.

-----------------

I haven't been around WUville much lately. According to a local saying, summer arrives on the 5th of July. And it did. Other than the day I went to Mt St Helens and Saturdays busy with housecleaning and board game hosting, I've been keeping out of mischief outdoors. I've been doing a bit of weeding in flower beds and clipping grass here and there with my trusty long-handled grass clippers.

The last of the water finally disappeared from our seasonal pond, otherwise known as Lake Boda. The canary reed grass around the edges wasn't full grown, but it was nearing 5 feet in height and the reeds and other marshy vegetation were quite dense. My trusty riding mower bogged down a few times, but after a couple of passes in different directions, managed to mow it off and chew it up fairly well. It will take another mowing for the area to look decent though.

I've had a couple of good weed-whacking sessions but haven't yet tackled the 900 feet of ditches along our little private road. That's coming soon though. It certainly needs it, but I need to tackle the weeds in my herb bed first.

I picked black currants and the first raspberries. There will be several more pickings of raspberries. Boysenberries, marionberries, and blueberries will be ripening within a few weeks, I think. The black currants are quite sour, but loaded with vitamins and flavor. I will boil them with a bit of water and strain the juice through a jelly bag. The undiluted juice is quite strong in flavor, but with the addition of some apple juice and sugar it cooks up into a very tasty jelly.

Recovering from the hip replacement four months ago is going well. I'm now able to climb a few steps and today, for the first time since the surgery, I was able to get up from kneeling without having to pull myself up on a piece of furniture. I was beginning to wonder if the necessary muscles would ever get strong enough, but they finally have. Exercises do pay off eventually. Going up steps or getting up from a kneeling position doesn't feel very good, so I won't be doing a lot of that quite yet, but being able to do it at all feels like a personal victory. First comes motion, then comes ease of motion, or so I reckon.

I hope you'll pardon me if I haven't been visiting your blogs as often as usual. I'm behind in my yard work and, while I'm moving pretty well, it isn't as fast as I'm used to, so it's taking me a while to get caught up. Good thing I didn't try to have a vegetable garden this year. Soon as I get caught up, or if the weather should turn hot, I'll be back to my usual blog-visiting routine.
Member Since: June 21, 2004 Posts: 88 Comments: 4444
30. toddluck
3:06 PM GMT on July 19, 2012
left you an email
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29. sandiquiz
2:48 PM GMT on July 19, 2012
Hi There,
Finally watched the programme on Mount St Helen's. It was a prog that showed how the flora and fauna survived and re-colonised the area after the eruption, from the first sightings of a gopher and one lupin, to whole meadows of wild flowers, new trees, rodents and a lake full of amphibians and trout! It also showed the volcanic glacier, and explained how it grew so big in such a short period of time.

Excellent cinematography and actually bought all your photos to life :)
Member Since: October 29, 2005 Posts: 301 Comments: 27127
28. BriarCraft
6:40 PM GMT on July 18, 2012
Ylee: The whole idea of Fibonacci numbers in Nature, for everything from nautilus shells to flower petals, fascinates me, too. No wonder those proportions are "naturally" pleasing to the eye.

Sandi and Pros: I think you're both right, that we tend to apply those "rules" without conscious thought. Those proportions or ratios just "feel" right when you see them. When asked why I like a particular photo or piece of art, I am often at a lack for words, but still I know it when I see it.

Pros: I'm sure -- well mostly sure -- that photo is of the early or late sun shining through some shrubbery, but you made it look like fire. And looking at it, I'm right behind you jumping into that tub of ice. It really looks HOT. If that was on WU instead of Photobucket, I'd give it a 10!
Member Since: June 21, 2004 Posts: 88 Comments: 4444
27. Proserpina
1:58 PM GMT on July 18, 2012
Photobucket

Here is a sample look for our fire hot day! As I look at your predominantly cool photos (cool blues, hip cool as well) I feel calm. Looking at my photo makes me want to jump in a bathtub full of ice!

It is true, if you don't use it, you lose it. But I have a strong feeling that some elements of one's learning, although actively forgotten, still remains as part of us and our thinking. So when you take your photos, I believe that without actively applying the rules you are applying the rules.

Often when my art teacher critiques one of my paintings or class exercise, she points out this rule or that rule that I applied. Well, I have news for her! I seldom actively apply any rules! It just happens, so it seems.

Have a wonderful day BC.
Member Since: May 6, 2008 Posts: 178 Comments: 18460
26. sandiquiz
1:07 PM GMT on July 18, 2012
I still haven't watched the TV prog I saved, but did find a few moments to read through the link you posted in #14. I find I incorporate the rule of thirds or the golden triangle (as I was taught it) without thinking .... it is usually how I "see" it, as a personal preference.

Thinking about it, even my garden design has the 'rule of thirds' applied to it! lol
Member Since: October 29, 2005 Posts: 301 Comments: 27127
25. Ylee
6:43 AM GMT on July 18, 2012
I've never heard of the Rule of Thirds or the Golden Rectangle until I clicked on your link in #14. The part about Fibronacci numbers are facintating, too!

I like the Mt. St. Helens cam!
Member Since: February 3, 2011 Posts: 98 Comments: 16622
24. BriarCraft
10:42 PM GMT on July 17, 2012
Todd: I'll bet you've got some stories worth telling. You've seen and been part of some history. I agree the volcanocam is usually pretty boring, but it's the only one I've found.

Pros: I originally learned about the Rule of Thirds and the Golden Rectangle from woodworking seminars, found them interesting at the time, but then just forgot. Probably because I gave up on designing my own pieces for the most part. I can visualize what I want, but just can't manage to make a decent sketch, let alone draft a plan. Like with many other things, if you don't use it, you loose it -- or at least you forget all about it.
Member Since: June 21, 2004 Posts: 88 Comments: 4444
23. Proserpina
11:01 AM GMT on July 17, 2012
I have not been around to say hello in quite some time, so here I am to wish you a wonderful Tuesday.

In my art classes I have learned all about the rules for a perfect painting including the rule of thirds. The art rules are about the same as the photography rules. And guess what, I break everyone of them! I claim poetic/art/photography license! But Shore is right about the rules, balance, variety of shapes, value changes, etc. etc. all create a pleasant picture/painting. And that's why your landscape photos are so beautiful, particularly the last one of the mountain.
Member Since: May 6, 2008 Posts: 178 Comments: 18460
22. toddluck
8:58 PM GMT on July 16, 2012
volcano cam kinda boring
http://www.fs.fed.us/gpnf/volcanocams/msh/
Member Since: April 28, 2006 Posts: 210 Comments: 14808
21. toddluck
8:52 PM GMT on July 16, 2012
we actually had hoffstadt b4 the damn went in we also had the resort on silver lake
and the crater house was 8 miles b4 you got to windy ridge i have no clue if its still in operation i havent been there in years
Member Since: April 28, 2006 Posts: 210 Comments: 14808
20. BriarCraft
8:23 PM GMT on July 16, 2012
Skye: I hadn't heard of Helenite, but back in the day when tourism to the volcano was big, there were a lot of volcano glass blowers around. Toledo even had one. Today, the only one I know of is at Hoffstadt Bluffs Visitor Center, but I'll bet there are some cottage industries around, selling on the internet. Buyer beware!

Sandi: If that is the 30-year anniversary program I saw two years ago, it's very good. Hope you enjoy.

SP: You wouldn't think a 45 degree change in perspective would make such a difference, but it does.

Todd: There is a boarded up building at the Smith Creek viewpoint that looks like it might have been a restaurant. There is one that's still open at Hoffstadt on the west side.

Here's a Forest Service map of the area.
Member Since: June 21, 2004 Posts: 88 Comments: 4444

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