Benign Summer Pattern Continues

By: Zachary Labe , 4:13 PM GMT on June 27, 2014

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Zachary Labe
27 July 2014

Warming temperatures and increasing humidity levels are the big weather stories for the upcoming stretch before the 4th of July. A temporary shift in the rossby wave patterns have allowed for increasing upper level thicknesses over the eastern contiguous United States. 1000-500mb thicknesses will rise to approximately 575dm across portions of the Middle Atlantic with H85 thermals at nearly 20C during the peak of the warmth.

It is likely an entirely accurate statement that the hypsometric equation is one of the fundementally most important in meteorology. Derivered from the ideal gas law and hydrostatic equation, the hypsometric can be manipulated to find out many important things about the atmosphere. Most commonly, it is used to relate the mean temperature of a layer over a given thickness (i.e. 1000-500mb thickness and the 540dm line).


(Courtesy of the Glossary of the American Meteorological Society)

where...
h = thickness
z = geometric heights
p = pressure levels
R = gas constant for dry air
T = average temperature in layer
g = gravity

The hypsometric is one of the most simple equations in meteorology and can be quickly altered by simple algebra. It is the starting place for many upper level meteorology courses. Using the direct proportion, we can see that as warm air advection increases (T increases), the air expands (h increases) and vice versa for cold air advection. Given this piece of evidence, we can note that pressure levels are not at a constant height. We cannot directly state that 850mb level is at 10,000ft aloft.

The temperature change in the atmosphere can tell us quite a bit about the present and future synoptic weather regimes. Therefore, given the increasing warmth over the next week, we can expect an expansion of air aloft. Middle range global ensembles suggest this milder pattern will be short lived with a returning trough axis after the 4th of July. This is relatively in support with most guidance. The summer season brings quieter and more stagnet weather patterns due to longer Rossby wavelengths that occur in both a lower frequency and few number. Teleconnections that are noted all too frequently during the winter season often become much less of a long term weather forecast aid during this time of year. In fact, some research would argue they present a relative useless value for Northeast weather pattern forecasting during July, and August.

Remarkable gains about been made across the equitorial Pacific over the last week with SST anomalies beginning to increase off the coast of South America. This supports dynamical model predictions of a positive ENSO cycle through at least the first half of winter.



Lack of a strong westerly wind burst and unimpressive Kelvin wave regime has allowed most of the warming to dominate across the eastern portions of the basin. Up until a week or so ago, significant increases in upwelling allowed temperatures to be slow to warm even for eastern areas. However, this has changed. I am currently unimpressed with the Kelvin wave structure (essentially sloshes the water back and forth across the Pacific), and I am therefore not expecting this ENSO regime to reach the parameters set forth as 'strong' by NOAA. Nevertheless, I would expect warming to begin to increase more sharply across the Nino 3.4 region over the next few weeks. Weather pattern effects for the United States will likely be noted more towards the end of summer with an increasing subtropical jet and will definitely influence the hurricane season.

Early long term predictors suggest a potentially interesting winter, but that is all I will say for now.

For next week, a bit more unsettled look is likely as the flow shifts to the southwest with increasing humidity. Diurnal convection is likely each day and generally focused across topographically influenced regions or along sea breezes. A cold front will move through at the end of the period, likely in association with a slight risk of the severe weather as deemed by the SPC categorical risks.

My exploration and summer in the Finger Lakes is going marvelously thus far. I have begun to explore my Senior Honors Thesis potential topic of anomalous cold season warm air advection events in relation to plant growth and growing degree hours. Otherwise, this weekend I plan to make a trip out to Watkins Glenn and explore its state park and nearby beautiful Seneca Lake. Excluding some dry conditions along the immediate Middle Atlantic coast up through most of southern New England, this summer has been providing enjoyable temperatures and precipitation for many.

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74. WunderAlertBot (Admin)
6:21 PM GMT on July 25, 2014
Blizzard92 has created a new entry.
73. Zachary Labe
12:29 AM GMT on July 25, 2014
Astrometeor- Hahaha oh my gosh, I thought you were joking. Link. Idiotic.

And no, I am not sure about any reruns of the episodes. But I will look into it for you and check out his blog.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 284 Comments: 15112
72. Astrometeor
8:46 PM GMT on July 24, 2014
Quoting 56. Blizzard92:

Did anyone get a chance to see this show on Sunday? Link


I'm not happy with the show time. It starts at the same time my church service starts....so...until I leave for college, I can't watch the shows. If TWC wants to show they genuinely care about their weather geek following, putting the show at an hour where the entire nation can watch would be so helpful.

Do you know if there is another time where they replay the episodes?

Meanwhile they have "Fat Guys in the Woods" this late summer coming out, and some other show I think...which I sort of feel is in direct violation of their contract with DirectTV.
Member Since: July 2, 2012 Posts: 101 Comments: 10328
71. Zachary Labe
6:12 PM GMT on July 24, 2014
Quoting 69. hurigo:

Hey Blizz, et al
We're hearing reports of severe damage on Virginia's Eastern Shore.

Yes, very sad story out of that region this morning; two fatalities and many injured. Link
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 284 Comments: 15112
70. NEwxguy
3:17 PM GMT on July 24, 2014
Hi,guys,very depressing with your notes about the departure of summer.
Our summers are short enough as is,but the last few years,we've had no summer in August,just the feel of fall.
Member Since: September 6, 2007 Posts: 881 Comments: 15820
69. hurigo
2:52 PM GMT on July 24, 2014
Hey Blizz, et al
We're hearing reports of severe damage on Virginia's Eastern Shore.
Member Since: October 9, 2005 Posts: 100 Comments: 6730
68. Zachary Labe
12:37 PM GMT on July 24, 2014
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 284 Comments: 15112
67. Zachary Labe
11:47 AM GMT on July 24, 2014
Quoting 65. TheRasberryPatch:



Not much different from the past few Augusts. Seems like we have been locked in a pattern where the end of July means the end of Summer. I can't recall too many Bermuda High's sitting off the coast in a long time.

IT is funny you mention that... I was just reading someone's analysis earlier yesterday about how pattern trends in late July foreshadow the rest of the month of August.

My parents yesterday also reported very heavy rain with my station recording 0.65" in 10 minutes and then a storm total of over 1" after the cell passed through.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 284 Comments: 15112
66. TheRasberryPatch
11:26 AM GMT on July 24, 2014
My total rainfall for yesterday's severe thunderstorm was 1.09" and most of that fell in about 20 mins. My highest wind gust was 40 mph. The winds were strong throughout the storm, which seem unusual. Most storms lately in my area will have strong gusts at the beginning of the storm.
Member Since: January 26, 2007 Posts: 72 Comments: 6259
65. TheRasberryPatch
9:19 PM GMT on July 23, 2014
Quoting 62. Blizzard92:

Farewell summer 2014?



Not much different from the past few Augusts. Seems like we have been locked in a pattern where the end of July means the end of Summer. I can't recall too many Bermuda High's sitting off the coast in a long time.
Member Since: January 26, 2007 Posts: 72 Comments: 6259
64. TheRasberryPatch
9:15 PM GMT on July 23, 2014
Just had a 40mph gust in this severe thunderstorm. It has been raining cats and dogs with 1.00" in 20 mins. The wind has been non-stop in the storm
Member Since: January 26, 2007 Posts: 72 Comments: 6259
63. ThePoetSirrah
6:34 PM GMT on July 23, 2014
Quoting 62. Blizzard92:

Farewell summer 2014?



Meanwhile Alaska bakes...
Member Since: October 25, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 64
62. Zachary Labe
4:56 PM GMT on July 23, 2014
Farewell summer 2014?
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 284 Comments: 15112
61. Zachary Labe
4:21 PM GMT on July 21, 2014
ThePoetSirrah- Yep, the global forecast models do not have near the resolution required to take into account the UHI. In fact, even our smallest model domains of 4km or so do not really have the capabilities for its algorithms. Although this is changing...
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 284 Comments: 15112
60. ThePoetSirrah
4:18 PM GMT on July 21, 2014
Quoting 54. Blizzard92:


I am not familiar with effects on urban precipitation during the winter; however, it is highly evident the warmer temperatures in urbanized locations during winter storms. This is particularly noticeable in the Washington DC area where a very strong urban heat island effect is evident. There is often a strong snowfall/temperature gradient between the suburbs and downtown. But most any other city will also see this effect. The UHI is highly documented and taken into account for most all daily winter forecasts for metropolitan areas.


This certainly seemed to be true for the infamous "Snowquester" Storm in DC where models predicted heavy snow for the city. I remember some people speculated whether the UHI was partially responsible for that bust. Dulles Airport and areas just outside of the city did get pummeled while the actual city didn't receive any snowfall. I would imagine the GFS and Euro aren't precise enough to account for the UHI.
Member Since: October 25, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 64
59. PatrioticThinking
12:59 PM GMT on July 21, 2014
Quoting 35. workinggirl99:

I am from upstate NY & remember the beautiful blue skies with big puffy clouds during the summer. Too bad we wont be seeing those anymore. Chemtrails are destroying our once beautiful atmosphere, changing the weather & creating general havoc. What a shame.

I live in SC now & every day the sky is a muddy gray, & whether I walk my dog during the morning or the evening, or even at night, I see plans spreading plumes everywhere & they settle in murky, stifling patches on the ground that just hang in the humid air down here. When I first moved here 8 years ago, the famous Carolina blue skies were something new & different for me & I loved the sunny blue skies. They predict showers down here daily, but in spite of the grayish muddy skies, it rarely rains; sometimes we get a quick shower but the summer storms dont happen as often as they used to.
They spray us everywhere everyday now . I have been seeing it worsen yearly, 99' was the first year and you barely saw them but once a month, Thank the U.N. all country's under there exo gov are under the nano particle fallout...
Member Since: December 11, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 12
58. PatrioticThinking
12:53 PM GMT on July 21, 2014
Weather everyday "" Partly Cloudy "" again next every day "" Party Cloudy "" Pay ATTENTION my citizens...
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57. PatrioticThinking
12:51 PM GMT on July 21, 2014
Quoting 50. yomenm:



Although I do not rule out your chemtrail angle, the sky in upstate NY, especially in the Fall, has never been matched in the Dirty South. I have been going to the SC for 30 some years, yearly.


Yomenm, I currently and actively fight the the geo engineering situation at hand " Chemtrails" are only apart of the problem try youttubin weather control and see how the use the NEXGEN to manipulate the pressure systems. As lead resident electrician at my facility... I can tell you the amount of power used at these nexgens is enough to power 1000's of single family homes and they dump this energy into the stratosphere every day from hundreds of locations. And yes chemtrail are considered the worse greenhouse problem to date, 100x that of methane and carbon combined...
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56. Zachary Labe
11:55 AM GMT on July 21, 2014
Did anyone get a chance to see this show on Sunday? Link
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 284 Comments: 15112
55. PatrioticThinking
11:34 AM GMT on July 21, 2014
What ever happened to Sunny Days? Cloudless Dark Blue Sunny Days???
Member Since: December 11, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 12
54. Zachary Labe
6:17 PM GMT on July 18, 2014
Quoting 53. ThePoetSirrah:



Does a similar effect occur over urbanized areas during winter storms too? It seems like it would.

I am not familiar with effects on urban precipitation during the winter; however, it is highly evident the warmer temperatures in urbanized locations during winter storms. This is particularly noticeable in the Washington DC area where a very strong urban heat island effect is evident. There is often a strong snowfall/temperature gradient between the suburbs and downtown. But most any other city will also see this effect. The UHI is highly documented and taken into account for most all daily winter forecasts for metropolitan areas.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 284 Comments: 15112
53. ThePoetSirrah
5:30 PM GMT on July 18, 2014
Quoting 47. Blizzard92:

yomenm- Urbanization most definitely has its own microclimate. In fact microclimatology and the urban heat island effect are some of my primary research interests. Not only do cities have a heat balance influence, but also a frictional effect. A very well studied aspect of cities are the effects on convection. While I do not remember the exact details offhand, a well accepted report from a study of Chinese metropolitan regions suggests that thunderstorms focus their lighter rain and QPF totals as they approach the city. But then a noticeable increase in precipitation as the storm exits the city. The data is actually remarkable! New dynamic and climate models are beginning to add algorithms to account for these heat and frictional effects. While still not completely well understand, you are not imagining things... it definitely changes natural storm tracks and impacts. If you ever have any more specific questions feel free to ask; I love this topic!


Does a similar effect occur over urbanized areas during winter storms too? It seems like it would.
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52. Zachary Labe
4:59 PM GMT on July 18, 2014
I have met Dr. Marshall Shepard, and I definitely believe with him as host this could be quite interesting... Link
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 284 Comments: 15112
51. Zachary Labe
3:01 PM GMT on July 17, 2014
Summer thus far... warm and wet Link
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 284 Comments: 15112
50. yomenm
3:13 AM GMT on July 17, 2014
Quoting 35. workinggirl99:

I am from upstate NY & remember the beautiful blue skies with big puffy clouds during the summer. Too bad we wont be seeing those anymore. Chemtrails are destroying our once beautiful atmosphere, changing the weather & creating general havoc. What a shame.

I live in SC now & every day the sky is a muddy gray, & whether I walk my dog during the morning or the evening, or even at night, I see plans spreading plumes everywhere & they settle in murky, stifling patches on the ground that just hang in the humid air down here. When I first moved here 8 years ago, the famous Carolina blue skies were something new & different for me & I loved the sunny blue skies. They predict showers down here daily, but in spite of the grayish muddy skies, it rarely rains; sometimes we get a quick shower but the summer storms dont happen as often as they used to.


Although I do not rule out your chemtrail angle, the sky in upstate NY, especially in the Fall, has never been matched in the Dirty South. I have been going to the SC for 30 some years, yearly.
Member Since: May 2, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 60
49. yomenm
1:39 AM GMT on July 17, 2014
Thank you Z. Labe and Astrometeor for the link also, very interesting.
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48. Zachary Labe
1:13 AM GMT on July 17, 2014
yomenm- I am not sure if this link will work (I have access to most scientific journals that are often not available to the public)... but anyways at least you can see the abstract. Excellent study on cities and precipitation in the Yangtze River Delta in China. Link. I was fortunate enough to meet the author of this study at the most recent American Meteorological Society Conference.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 284 Comments: 15112
47. Zachary Labe
1:07 AM GMT on July 17, 2014
yomenm- Urbanization most definitely has its own microclimate. In fact microclimatology and the urban heat island effect are some of my primary research interests. Not only do cities have a heat balance influence, but also a frictional effect. A very well studied aspect of cities are the effects on convection. While I do not remember the exact details offhand, a well accepted report from a study of Chinese metropolitan regions suggests that thunderstorms focus their lighter rain and QPF totals as they approach the city. But then a noticeable increase in precipitation as the storm exits the city. The data is actually remarkable! New dynamic and climate models are beginning to add algorithms to account for these heat and frictional effects. While still not completely well understand, you are not imagining things... it definitely changes natural storm tracks and impacts. If you ever have any more specific questions feel free to ask; I love this topic!

Astrometeor- Thanks for the link! A close friend in my department at Cornell spent last summer at Columbia University working with their Earth Institute to monitor changes in monarch butterfly migration over time. She actually graduated this year from Cornell and is now attending Columbia for a Masters at their climate institute.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 284 Comments: 15112
46. yomenm
11:09 PM GMT on July 16, 2014
Quoting 45. Astrometeor:



Me too as well, including my favorite, the Monarch Butterfly.



Link

I would help my sister when I was little with collecting caterpillars and feeding them and raising them up to butterfly status.


There are three Monarchs playing above the central air unit, in the air stream (They seem to really like this) but the past couple years there were twice as many. I saw one chasing a dragon-fly the other day. I found that odd.
Member Since: May 2, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 60
45. Astrometeor
9:14 PM GMT on July 16, 2014
Quoting 43. yomenm:

Unrelated: I see far fewer lightning-bugs and butterflies this year.


Me too as well, including my favorite, the Monarch Butterfly.



Link

I would help my sister when I was little with collecting caterpillars and feeding them and raising them up to butterfly status.
Member Since: July 2, 2012 Posts: 101 Comments: 10328
44. Astrometeor
9:04 PM GMT on July 16, 2014
Quoting 40. Blizzard92:

We are now at the climatologically hottest week of the year.


Hey Zach, have you seen this blog? I thought it was a cool representation of the various "hottest weeks of the year" for locales across the country. Link
Member Since: July 2, 2012 Posts: 101 Comments: 10328
43. yomenm
7:21 PM GMT on July 16, 2014
In Brooklyn, I look forward to the rain. I usually watch the radar with anticipation. For some time I have thought that I see a trend of storm fronts breaking-up, splitting North and South, or veering North just before they hit NYC. Am I just imagining this because I long for the rain, or is there some way in which the city (heat storage, tall building or what have you) affects the storm front? I have no meteorological knowledge, so I ask you folks.
Of course, storms do hit the city but I am surprised how often they appear to weaken and break apart right to the West of the city.
Unrelated: I see far fewer lightning-bugs and butterflies this year.
Member Since: May 2, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 60
42. Zachary Labe
3:26 PM GMT on July 16, 2014
Looks like New Jersey is the "winner" for the last few days of precipitation; very nice call by the WPC from a few days ago. Link
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 284 Comments: 15112
41. originalLT
1:19 PM GMT on July 16, 2014
Thanks Zach. In my little corner of CT. we really "under-performed" with the rain yesterday. As of 9pm last night, only 0.62" for Tuesday, after getting 2.60" on Monday. I have two rain gauges and both concur . One is in the front yard, the other in the back yard. Two day total for me was, 3.22".
Member Since: January 31, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 7593
40. Zachary Labe
1:00 PM GMT on July 16, 2014
We are now at the climatologically hottest week of the year. However, long term guidance suggests the upper level ridge will stay positioned to our west mitigating any heat wave away from the region.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 284 Comments: 15112
39. TheRasberryPatch
12:17 PM GMT on July 16, 2014
After a mostly dry June, I have received 3.58" of rain the past week with the most in one day of 1.27"
Member Since: January 26, 2007 Posts: 72 Comments: 6259
38. originalLT
2:48 AM GMT on July 16, 2014
Listener, check your WU Mail.
Member Since: January 31, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 7593
37. ThePoetSirrah
6:04 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Quoting 36. weathernewbie:

Hi Blizz and all,
Just checking in from Philadelphia, most incredible lightning I ever remember seeing. Am on the top floor of Van Pelt Library at UPenn. Windows were moving from the wind!


It seems like there's been a lot of unsettled weather here in the past few weeks -- mostly high wind events. Last night's storm was impressive for its duration and lightning show. A lot of branches were down on the Schuylkill River Trail this morning, especially near the boat houses. I'm sure it was quite the display watching the storm from up above.
Member Since: October 25, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 64
36. weathernewbie
12:26 AM GMT on July 15, 2014
Hi Blizz and all,
Just checking in from Philadelphia, most incredible lightning I ever remember seeing. Am on the top floor of Van Pelt Library at UPenn. Windows were moving from the wind!
Member Since: September 26, 2005 Posts: 3 Comments: 48
35. workinggirl99
9:42 PM GMT on July 13, 2014
I am from upstate NY & remember the beautiful blue skies with big puffy clouds during the summer. Too bad we wont be seeing those anymore. Chemtrails are destroying our once beautiful atmosphere, changing the weather & creating general havoc. What a shame.

I live in SC now & every day the sky is a muddy gray, & whether I walk my dog during the morning or the evening, or even at night, I see plans spreading plumes everywhere & they settle in murky, stifling patches on the ground that just hang in the humid air down here. When I first moved here 8 years ago, the famous Carolina blue skies were something new & different for me & I loved the sunny blue skies. They predict showers down here daily, but in spite of the grayish muddy skies, it rarely rains; sometimes we get a quick shower but the summer storms dont happen as often as they used to.
Member Since: March 31, 2014 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
34. Zachary Labe
1:14 PM GMT on July 11, 2014
Quoting 33. TheRasberryPatch:

I'm not dry anymore. The past 3 days we've had rain. The first 2 were light, but last night we had 1.27" in about 45 minutes. I was inside a restaurant, but it had strong winds. A lot of leaves and debris all over. I think Hershey got hit hard again. There were a lot of tree damage from Tuesday evening and I heard The Country Club is closed again due to the severe weather.
I'm not sure if it is because the trees are old or the storm was destructive. Probably, a combination of both.

I saw some flooding pictures out of Hershey Park from last night. What an impressive cell. My parents said my station recorded 1.62" of rain, but no significant wind. SPC reported tree damage in Derry Township and down your way in Campbelltown.
-
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 284 Comments: 15112
33. TheRasberryPatch
11:30 AM GMT on July 11, 2014
I'm not dry anymore. The past 3 days we've had rain. The first 2 were light, but last night we had 1.27" in about 45 minutes. I was inside a restaurant, but it had strong winds. A lot of leaves and debris all over. I think Hershey got hit hard again. There were a lot of tree damage from Tuesday evening and I heard The Country Club is closed again due to the severe weather.
I'm not sure if it is because the trees are old or the storm was destructive. Probably, a combination of both.
Member Since: January 26, 2007 Posts: 72 Comments: 6259
32. TheRasberryPatch
12:51 PM GMT on July 09, 2014
Quoting 31. Blizzard92:


Winds blowing into the storm coinciding with the gust front signal a back-ended downdraft where precipitation is at the back of the cumulonimbus. Keep in mind thunderstorms need a continuous flow of air with an updraft and subsequent downdraft. Therefore, depending on the storm structure you likely were influenced by a strong updraft feeding the thunderstorm. In an ideal thunderstorm schematic this would occur behind the thunderstorm but that is not always the case. Another possible reason is that the thunderstorm was cycling through intensity, much like hurricanes do in a way but just on a smaller, different scale.


Thank you for the information. It seems easy to think and understand, but just like Physics it's a mindset
Member Since: January 26, 2007 Posts: 72 Comments: 6259
31. Zachary Labe
12:27 PM GMT on July 09, 2014
Quoting 29. TheRasberryPatch:

A question: When the front hit I had a wind gust of 40 mph. What was weird is the wind blew the opposite direction of the storm movement. Is that normal?

Winds blowing into the storm coinciding with the gust front signal a back-ended downdraft where precipitation is at the back of the cumulonimbus. Keep in mind thunderstorms need a continuous flow of air with an updraft and subsequent downdraft. Therefore, depending on the storm structure you likely were influenced by a strong updraft feeding the thunderstorm. In an ideal thunderstorm schematic this would occur behind the thunderstorm but that is not always the case. Another possible reason is that the thunderstorm was cycling through intensity, much like hurricanes do in a way but just on a smaller, different scale.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 284 Comments: 15112
30. Zachary Labe
12:20 PM GMT on July 09, 2014
Quoting 28. TheRasberryPatch:



Does that mean after your PhD program you will look to find a job in Ithaca? Is there research in that area? I bet it is beautiful there and somewhat close to the Finger Lakes. I've heard the Finger Lakes has some great orchards and wines. Is there any skiing in that area? Or is it more about snowmobiling and cross country skiing?

I am not interested in academia research post graduation, so no I probably will not be looking in Ithaca. I do not really have any places in mind for moving to, perhaps Boston or Seattle. I do though know where I do not want to be haha. Ithaca definitely has more snow mobiling and cross country skiing. Although there are a few smaller resorts nearby such as Greek Peak. However, the Catskills really are not that far of a drive from here and offer much larger mountains.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 284 Comments: 15112
29. TheRasberryPatch
11:33 AM GMT on July 09, 2014
A question: When the front hit I had a wind gust of 40 mph. What was weird is the wind blew the opposite direction of the storm movement. Is that normal?
Member Since: January 26, 2007 Posts: 72 Comments: 6259
28. TheRasberryPatch
2:26 AM GMT on July 09, 2014
Quoting 26. Blizzard92:


I am looking into PhD programs currently and favoring the University of Chicago as my number one choice at the moment. I am definitely anticipating leaving the area. I love the Ithaca area; it gives me my perfect taste of nature and plenty of hiking areas. I was just over in Watkins Glen last weekend, which was quite a treat. This Saturday I am taking a day trip to the beautiful Lake Keuka.


Does that mean after your PhD program you will look to find a job in Ithaca? Is there research in that area? I bet it is beautiful there and somewhat close to the Finger Lakes. I've heard the Finger Lakes has some great orchards and wines. Is there any skiing in that area? Or is it more about snowmobiling and cross country skiing?
Member Since: January 26, 2007 Posts: 72 Comments: 6259
27. Zachary Labe
1:35 AM GMT on July 09, 2014
Rough storms across the Syracuse metro region with three fatalities being reported this evening.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 284 Comments: 15112
26. Zachary Labe
12:33 AM GMT on July 09, 2014
Quoting 24. TheRasberryPatch:



Things are busy with 2 kids. My garden is doing well. I've been picking cucumbers now for a week. They are so good. Beets are ready to be picked.

It's been really drying in the area. I got 0.27" of rain from this line. It will help a bit. The weather has been pretty dull around here. It's been actually great, but dull.

I was sitting outside last night with breezy conditions and just enjoying the moon and sitting in the dark. For some reason I love temps in the 80's at night and just enjoying the evening sounds.

I see your school work is really taking off. A summer away from home....how is that going? Do you miss Hersheypark? And working at the outlets? Think you will have to move away from the area after school for work?

I am looking into PhD programs currently and favoring the University of Chicago as my number one choice at the moment. I am definitely anticipating leaving the area. I love the Ithaca area; it gives me my perfect taste of nature and plenty of hiking areas. I was just over in Watkins Glen last weekend, which was quite a treat. This Saturday I am taking a day trip to the beautiful Lake Keuka.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 284 Comments: 15112
25. TheRasberryPatch
12:29 AM GMT on July 09, 2014
Blizz - NOAA weather radio and TV was all over the line about how severe and life threatening. Guess what? At the beginning we had strong winds with the rain that lasted 15 seconds. No hail. Very little lightning and thunder.
I guess they are better off warning people and nothing happening vs not warning and something happening
Member Since: January 26, 2007 Posts: 72 Comments: 6259
24. TheRasberryPatch
12:26 AM GMT on July 09, 2014
Quoting 23. Blizzard92:

TheRasberryPatch- Hey! How is it going? My parents reported a lot of wind, but very little rain. It sounds like there are some trees down on 2nd street in Harrisburg.


Things are busy with 2 kids. My garden is doing well. I've been picking cucumbers now for a week. They are so good. Beets are ready to be picked.

It's been really drying in the area. I got 0.27" of rain from this line. It will help a bit. The weather has been pretty dull around here. It's been actually great, but dull.

I was sitting outside last night with breezy conditions and just enjoying the moon and sitting in the dark. For some reason I love temps in the 80's at night and just enjoying the evening sounds.

I see your school work is really taking off. A summer away from home....how is that going? Do you miss Hersheypark? And working at the outlets? Think you will have to move away from the area after school for work?
Member Since: January 26, 2007 Posts: 72 Comments: 6259

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Cornell University- Atmospheric Sciences Undergrad; Research Assist.- Onset of Spring Indices Toolbox; Interests- Small spatial scale climatolology

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