Winter's Return?

By: Zachary Labe , 7:56 PM GMT on February 19, 2014

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Zachary Labe
19 February 2014

I remain incredulous toward my ongoing saga with the maintenance staff.

Picture a lovely, turn of the 20th century tudor-style mansion. Picture this mansion turned a'la-frat. And now picture this mansion turned into a small dormitory. Understandably so, given its age and location (yes, the northwestern-most Lake Cayuga bluff is probably not the most ideal for insulation), my residential hall is probably not the most air-tight structure on this here side of the Mississippi. And the ancient steam/radiator heat is probably not the most efficient. But there is a problem. Inside this mammoth structure is a temperature range that shows a greater deviation than the climate of San Francisco.

It began in the fall.
Day 1: temperature outside falls below 32. No heat. Okay, whatever.
Day 2: temperature falls below 25. No heat. Another whatever, although my poor little ivy plant is showing signs of wilt.
Day 3: temperature falls into the teens. No heat

So because the rest of the people living in this virtual temperature hell remain as passive as ants, I decide to send a friendly email to maintenance inquiring about turning on the heat.

3:15 AM. I wake up in a terrible sweat after suffering eccentric dreams of shapes and colors. The temperature in my room is that of a Brazilian rain forest. Alas, I open the window for some soothing Ithacan air. I last about three days. And I have begun to note that the windows to everyone's rooms are open.

This time I decide to send a bit more strongly worded of an email concerning rapidly increasing temperatures via the tudor's radiator. Now lets keep in mind, my version of strongly worded is most people's normal and benevolent text. So, sorry to disappoint.

After great despair, a median temperature is reached.

Fast forward to January.

After a few relaxing weeks off school, I return from winter break. I open the door to my room and a wall of steam greets me to open my pores. It seems our lovely little radiator system is malfunctioning again. Or is it? My ivy plant begins to wilt again from oppressive heat. And once again I turn to the windows and Ithacan air for some below zero temperature relief. This time I last two days. Another email. The next day, I find myself wrapped in a cocoon with mittens and a wool hat over my head. There is no heat radiating from the radiator. Outside, we are at a warm -7F and the wind is howling up the bluff at 50mph (okay, probably more like 15). I decide to google ways to stay warm without the use of a heating system. As a result, I pitch a blanket tent over my bed. The next morning, I awaken to windows that have frozen on the inside glass pane. The cup of water on my nightstand a frozen block. And my ivy plant. Well. Dead. I decide to give it one more night.

Maintenance controls the heat output. And once again, a spiteful tropical rain forest temperature spell is placed back on the building. And yeah, you guessed it. Another email. This exchange continues to this day. A wanted sign now hangs with my photo in the maintenance closet.

Everyone reading is probably now under the assumption that Blizzard92 is a spoiled brat. Nah. Not so. Anal retentive. Maybe. Exaggerator. Maybe. But when annual tuition numbers of $60,000 flicker in your bursar bills, eh well yeah... And when big brother (there's that exaggerator persona coming out again) controls your room's every temperature function. So yeah, maybe just maybe you can see my frustration. Okay. Probably not.

But that is what a blog is for, right? Complaining about life. All I ask for is a night my house plants do not die, and I can visibly see through my windows without excessive steam or frost build-up. That day. That day will be a great day. R.A.N.T. Over.

------------------------------------------------



Its no surprise that the last 15 days have contained their fair share of cold and snowy. The general public is tired of it. Snowlovers are tired of it. I am tired of it. In fact, early statistics may prove this two-week period to be one of the snowiest on record (excluding anomalous KU storms) for the New York City metropolitan area. It is likely most climatological reporting stations along the I-95 corridor will reach their snowiest or at least in the top 5 snowiest season on record.

The jet stream has finally buckled and shifted in an orientation with increasing southwesterly winds aloft bringing in some much-needed warmer air for the east coast.



GFS individual ensembles show very little deviation in solution for this time period as a classic Norwegian-style middle latitude cyclone (sub 988mb) plows through the western Great Lakes. The +10C H85 thermal will rise along with the warm front as far north as the New York/Pennsylvania on Friday with surface temperatures rising into the lower 50s for many areas. Warm sector is pretty nicely illustrated by current guidance, and therefore I am expecting temperatures to exceed current MOS values for this Friday-Saturday time frame. Frontogenic forcing along the face of the cold front in addition to moderately steep lapse rates will focus a band of heavy rain that will move across the Northeast on Friday. The greatest axis of vertical velocity components and lifting mechanisms remain displaced to the north and any surface instability displaced to the south across North and South Carolina. 0-3km shear of around 30 knots is relatively unimpressive and the current SWEAT readings are not even registering. I am not expecting any severe weather for any locations north of a Richmond, VA to Salisbury, MD line. A few rumbles of thunders are possible and gusty showers. But even PWATs are sub +1SD, so nothing standing out there. Most areas will receive around 0.25" to 0.50" of QPF on Friday in the form of rain. This will certainly not be enough to push any areas toward major flooding.

The anomalous warm only lasts for a three or so day period this week therefore, limiting any rapid snow melt. Max boundary layer temperatures reach maybe 60F for some eastern I-95 locations. There is a myriad of factors to consider when analyzing ice jams and snow cover melt, but I do not see any red-flags for this period at this time.



A final, reinforcing cold front will move through the Northeast on Saturday allowing H85 thermals to fall back below 0C. Weak forcing and dry air aloft should inhibit any precipitation with this frontal passage.

Weak vorticies will continue to move through the Northeast early next week under a northwest CAA regime. Lake Ontario may produce a bit of moderate lake effect snow during this period given ice coverage is still around 70% in comparison to the 95%+ for the other lakes.



Current global model guidance and teleconnections are signaling the return of anomalously cold air during the final week of February. Upwards of -3SD air will move south over New England with H85s falling to near -20C as far south as central New York.

Multiple shortwaves will rotate through the region next week, but I do not see any glaring significant cylogenesis flags. I understand the ECMWF has been waving at the 10-day time frame, but I am not overly enthusiastic. Reading wavelengths from Asia and extrapolating downstream has been more difficult this winter due to a high number of perturbations in the jet stream, so my confidence is lower than normal.



I am very confident for a significant cold period with temperatures well below normal in the 2/24-3/2 time frame. But I think the majority of the period will be dry. See the January cold spell as a good comparison to this pattern. Although temperatures this time around will not be as cold given climatology. Highs may struggle to reach 30F for southern areas like Washington DC for one or two days in this time frame. Any significant winter storm is likely well off in the horizon, if at all. Bottom line is that the weather pattern is finally becoming a bit more quiet. A relatively meager warm period followed by cold and dry weather.

Follow my 24hr forecasts on Twitter... Link and Facebook... Link.

Lower Susquehanna Valley Doppler...

(Courtesy of WGAL)

"10mi northeast of Harrisburg 2013-2014 Winter Statistics"
(Snow Stats)
Monthly Total (October)- 0.0"
Monthly Total (November)- Dusting
Monthly Total (December)- 9.6"
Monthly Total (January)- 10.3"
Monthly Total (February)- 25.0"
Monthly Total (March)- 0.5"
Seasonal Total- 45.4"

(Snow Storms Stats)
Trace - November 8 - First trace of snow - Lake effect snow shower
Dusting - November 12 - First snow on the ground - Anafront
1.5" - December 8 - First inch of snow - WAA double barrel low
4.3" - December 14 - Miller B - Changed to freezing rain/sleet
1.3" - December 17 - Alberta Clipper
2.0" - December 26 - Surprise squall/clipper
4.8" - January 2-3 - Miller B Coastal
1.5" - January 10 - SWFE all snow
3.1" - January 21 - Redeveloping clipper with heavy snow along I-95
6.0" - February 3 - Wet snow from coastal low
1.5" - February 5 - All sleet accumulation with 0.3" of freezing rain
1.5" - February 9 - Light snow with Alberta Clipper
10.5" - February 12-13 - Nor'easter
3.5" - February 15 - Alberta Clipper redevelopment
2.0" - February 18 - Clipper/snow squalls

(Advisories Issued)
Winter Weather Advisories- 12
Winter Storm Warnings- 4
Ice Storm Warnings- 0
Blizzard Warnings- 0
Freezing Rain Advisories- 3
Winter Storm Watches- 5

(Temperature Stats)
Lowest High Temperature- 9.6F on 1/7/2014
Lowest Low Temperature- -3.1F on 1/7/2014
Wind Chill Advisories- 3
Wind Chill Warnings- 0

(Cornell University (950ft elev.) Snow Stats)
Monthly Total (October)- 0.0"
Monthly Total (November)- 3.7"
Monthly Total (December)- 16.4"
Monthly Total (January)- 18.5"
Monthly Total (February)- 19.1"
Monthly Total (March)- 1.5"
Seasonal Total- 59.2"

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204. WunderAlertBot (Admin)
8:41 PM GMT on March 12, 2014
Blizzard92 has created a new entry.
203. listenerVT
12:54 AM GMT on March 12, 2014
Walshy, are the trees coming back up at all? I hope they won't have to cut the ones that are hanging in the road. Trees usually do stand up again, but it might take awhile. If they break they will reappropriate the nutrition that is no longer needed for the lost branches and get stronger elsewhere. If a whole tree comes down, the other plants around it get extra nutrition and fill in.
Member Since: July 11, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 5401
202. TheRasberryPatch
3:46 AM GMT on March 11, 2014
wow Walshy. That looks bad. I hope the warm weather has helped
Member Since: January 26, 2007 Posts: 72 Comments: 6233
201. listenerVT
1:14 AM GMT on March 11, 2014
Quoting 198. PhillySnow:
Hope you get your snow, Listener! Not many winters where I have as much snow - or more - than you've gotten. :)


Thanks! It looks like I am getting it, and possibly more! They've upped the projected snow total to 10"-20" now! Sounds like my evening Watecolour class will be cancelled and I'll get to shovel instead! I think of that as a Win-Win. ;-)
Member Since: July 11, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 5401
200. Walshy
12:08 AM GMT on March 11, 2014
Still cleaning up from the storm. Some schools will still be closed tomorrow in NC.

Tree damage was extensive. 5" of wet 32 degree snow has been much worse than the 12" of snow earlier this winter.

Icing over half an inch occurred to my east!
Member Since: May 17, 2009 Posts: 2 Comments: 904
199. Gaara
11:32 PM GMT on March 10, 2014
Hmm.. Our annual trip to Bethlehem, NH for a stay in the umass amherst cabin may be delayed a day by this little event coming up. Drat.
Member Since: December 27, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 355
198. PhillySnow
4:24 PM GMT on March 10, 2014
Hope you get your snow, Listener! Not many winters where I have as much snow - or more - than you've gotten. :)
Member Since: December 18, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 1210
197. listenerVT
4:16 PM GMT on March 10, 2014
Quoting 196. originalLT:
Hi Listener, Accuweather this morning (Monday), has your area pegged for 6-12" of snow by Thursday afternoon. Not much mention of any ICE.


Thanks, LT! Yeah I just saw that Wednesday is ramping up to bring 6-14" of snow, though I'm apparently on the lower end of the totals. We need a snow totals map!

Apparently bumping the turn signal device on the way out of my car turns on its parking lights. Who knew? It's not good to leave your parking lights on for two days, especially when you have twelve places you need to go. Heh.
Member Since: July 11, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 5401
196. originalLT
2:47 PM GMT on March 10, 2014
Hi Listener, Accuweather this morning (Monday), has your area pegged for 6-12" of snow by Thursday afternoon. Not much mention of any ICE.
Member Since: January 31, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 7064
195. listenerVT
1:33 AM GMT on March 10, 2014
Looks like a messy week here, with maybe 3" of snow on Wednesday.
Anything to worry about? What's the likelihood of ice?

This LINK takes you to a video of the 1998 ice storm, as experienced from the NY side of Lake Champlain.
Member Since: July 11, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 5401
194. Walshy
4:37 PM GMT on March 09, 2014
I see the EURO is showing some 9 to 10 day threats from North Carolina northward.

I would love to bite but need that within 5 days and under!

Member Since: May 17, 2009 Posts: 2 Comments: 904
193. listenerVT
4:05 AM GMT on March 09, 2014
Quoting 188. Blizzard92:
Thanks everyone! I am very excited as it should outline my senior honors thesis in addition to possibly presenting at next year's AMS conference in Phoenix; it should be a great opportunity. Also in two weeks, I have registered for a guest course through the Natural Disaster Preparedness Training Center for tornado awareness. I should be getting my FEMA tornado emergency management certification after this event. So busy, busy up here, but certainly no complaints on my end haha.


Can't help feeling excited and proud! Gosh, we knew you when you were in high school and merely could predict the weather better than the local forecasters! ;-) Now look at you gaining knowledge and expertise. Go, Zachary! So pleased for you!
Member Since: July 11, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 5401
192. originalLT
12:51 AM GMT on March 09, 2014
Congrats Zach to all that's going on with you, as you say, "busy, busy" but that is great. I know with your intellect you will take it all in and be so much better off for it.
Member Since: January 31, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 7064
191. Zachary Labe
1:33 PM GMT on March 08, 2014
Quoting 189. TheRasberryPatch:
Wow, Blizz sounds like a really fun and exciting course load.

A question - has anyone ever looked into a change in the declination of Earth's axis or something else similar as to change in some climate weather.

There is plenty of research in this area, but the small wobbling in addition to several other factors is the cause for changes in climate trends and patterns. The axis shift itself has been very minor. We are fortunate enough to have up here four of probably the most leading climatology scientists in the US; they all bring different perspectives and ideas. However, planetary wobble and it's associated change appears pretty small in the scheme of other natural causes.

Surprisingly right around earth's birth four billion years ago, most of the warm climate despite a weak sun was due to the processes of hydrolysis, dissolution, and changes in albedo. Pretty interesting because most people don't think of the first two small process and their impacts on the atmosphere.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 278 Comments: 15045
190. Pcroton
1:25 PM GMT on March 08, 2014
Our planet wobbles, TRP.

There is extensive research done on the Sahara desert and what I believe was uncovered is that the latitude of the region may have been as much as 10 degrees further south at one point, placing it where you see the green belt of Africa today, which would explain why it was once a water world that was densely inhabited...and also would explain it's incredible subterranian aquifier (perhaps the largest known in the world). Also of note is cave drawings that date back over 10,000 years in the region depicting a lush landscape full of plants, water, animals, etc. These were done by people who lived there and likely never traveled far so that leads to the idea that it was once a water world.

The Mayans also took note of various planetary cycles of 5,000 years and 16,0000 years (unsure of exact numbers) which relate to the planet's wobbles.
Member Since: September 26, 2011 Posts: 29 Comments: 5125
189. TheRasberryPatch
1:18 PM GMT on March 08, 2014
Wow, Blizz sounds like a really fun and exciting course load.

A question - has anyone ever looked into a change in the declination of Earth's axis or something else similar as to change in some climate weather.
Member Since: January 26, 2007 Posts: 72 Comments: 6233
188. Zachary Labe
4:27 AM GMT on March 08, 2014
Thanks everyone! I am very excited as it should outline my senior honors thesis in addition to possibly presenting at next year's AMS conference in Phoenix; it should be a great opportunity. Also in two weeks, I have registered for a guest course through the Natural Disaster Preparedness Training Center for tornado awareness. I should be getting my FEMA tornado emergency management certification after this event. So busy, busy up here, but certainly no complaints on my end haha.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 278 Comments: 15045
187. listenerVT
2:45 AM GMT on March 08, 2014
Quoting 179. Blizzard92:
It looks like I will be staying at Cornell over the summer doing research with a professor on phenometrics. We will be utilizing meteorological observation and reanalysis data through NARR and NetCDF to correlate multiple indices to create an teleconnection index to predict the onset of spring climatology timing. Then a focus will be on analyzing trends over the last few centuries in correlation to climatology and a changing Earth's energy budget. I'll be doing most of the index reanalysis, through Python. Our grants are currently out of the USGS and potentially NASA later in the ~2 year proposal. This is a very exciting field that has a very small portion devoted to meteorological data sets. I am currently brushing up my programming skills; the project will generally begin slowly after my spring break. There will be a website devoted to our lab and the process of this climate extrapolation data; I will be sure to post a link for those interested in following our progress.


Wonderful! I'll be looking forward to the website! Congratulations, Zach, on being chosen for this!
Member Since: July 11, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 5401
186. Pcroton
11:46 PM GMT on March 07, 2014
Quoting 180. Blizzard92:
TheRasberryPatch- Unfortunately my blueberry bushes did not survive. I still do not really understand what happened. I had one decent summer's production (eaten by birds), but after that they sort of shriveled up lol.



There have been some diseases going around that you could probably ask a local farmer about. My neighbor here also lost his 5 year old berry plants.

Around here in NJ we have been seeing rosemary plants go belly up due to an unpreventable disease.

Everyone's mature plants started dying around 3 years ago and needed replacement every 1-2 years. We just can't seem to get them to survive.

I saw a 12 year old plant die a couple years ago and replaced it.

Then my 2 year old one made it through the winter green (probably frozen green) and died as soon as we warmed two weekends ago.


Maybe it's something similar.
Member Since: September 26, 2011 Posts: 29 Comments: 5125
185. bwi
9:59 PM GMT on March 07, 2014
Fantastic news! It's wonderful to get these sorts of grad school level opportunities as an undergrad. I hope you learn a ton and help the rest of understand what's going on with the weird weather in the process!

Quoting 179. Blizzard92:
It looks like I will be staying at Cornell over the summer doing research with a professor on phenometrics. We will be utilizing meteorological observation and reanalysis data through NARR and NetCDF to correlate multiple indices to create an teleconnection index to predict the onset of spring climatology timing. Then a focus will be on analyzing trends over the last few centuries in correlation to climatology and a changing Earth's energy budget. I'll be doing most of the index reanalysis, through Python. Our grants are currently out of the USGS and potentially NASA later in the ~2 year proposal. This is a very exciting field that has a very small portion devoted to meteorological data sets. I am currently brushing up my programming skills; the project will generally begin slowly after my spring break. There will be a website devoted to our lab and the process of this climate extrapolation data; I will be sure to post a link for those interested in following our progress.
Member Since: September 4, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 1356
184. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
9:25 PM GMT on March 07, 2014
Quoting 183. Blizzard92:
KEEPEROFTHEGATE- For energy and agricultural purposes, spring is one of the most costly due to variable weather patterns. March 2012 is a good example where extreme warmth caused nearly a billion dollars in damage after normal weather resumed back in April and normals frosts killed much of the early blooms and crops. Given increasing variability in such weather patterns, especially noted during major season changes over the last decade, this index's goal is to provide a solution to the inherit risk in the economics markets through better forecasting and preparation.



we suffered the same fate here during the summer in march and late feb even in 2013

lots of loss because of the early warmth

it would a good thing to get data for

good luck with it

I am sure its going to be lots of work with it
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 163 Comments: 52216
183. Zachary Labe
9:19 PM GMT on March 07, 2014
KEEPEROFTHEGATE- For energy and agricultural purposes, spring is one of the most costly due to variable weather patterns. March 2012 is a good example where extreme warmth caused nearly a billion dollars in damage after normal weather resumed back in April and normals frosts killed much of the early blooms and crops. Given increasing variability in such weather patterns, especially noted during major season changes over the last decade, this index's goal is to provide a solution to the inherit risk in the economics markets through better forecasting and preparation.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 278 Comments: 15045
182. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
9:15 PM GMT on March 07, 2014
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 163 Comments: 52216
181. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
9:14 PM GMT on March 07, 2014
Quoting 179. Blizzard92:
It looks like I will be staying at Cornell over the summer doing research with a professor on phenometrics. We will be utilizing meteorological observation and reanalysis data through NARR and NetCDF to correlate multiple indices to create an teleconnection index to predict the onset of spring climatology timing. Then a focus will be on analyzing trends over the last few centuries in correlation to climatology and a changing Earth's energy budget. I'll be doing most of the index reanalysis, through Python. Our grants are currently out of the USGS, NCAR, and potentially NASA later in the ~2 year proposal. This is a very exciting field that has a very small portion devoted to meteorological data sets. I am currently brushing up my programming skills; the project will generally begin slowly after my spring break.


the spring thing sounds interesting blizz

with winter on the down slope now
should be getting slow for winter weather anyway much deserved break once march be done
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 163 Comments: 52216
180. Zachary Labe
9:12 PM GMT on March 07, 2014
TheRasberryPatch- Unfortunately my blueberry bushes did not survive. I still do not really understand what happened. I had one decent summer's production (eaten by birds), but after that they sort of shriveled up lol.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 278 Comments: 15045
179. Zachary Labe
9:10 PM GMT on March 07, 2014
It looks like I will be staying at Cornell over the summer doing research with a professor on phenometrics. We will be utilizing meteorological observation and reanalysis data through NARR and NetCDF to correlate multiple indices to create an teleconnection index to predict the onset of spring climatology timing. Then a focus will be on analyzing trends over the last few centuries in correlation to climatology and a changing Earth's energy budget. I'll be doing most of the index reanalysis, through Python. Our grants are currently out of the USGS and potentially NASA later in the ~2 year proposal. This is a very exciting field that has a very small portion devoted to meteorological data sets. I am currently brushing up my programming skills; the project will generally begin slowly after my spring break. There will be a website devoted to our lab and the process of this climate extrapolation data; I will be sure to post a link for those interested in following our progress.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 278 Comments: 15045
178. TheRasberryPatch
8:15 PM GMT on March 07, 2014
Glad to see you got into the snow, Walshy.

The Cedar Wax Wing is a beautiful bird. I wish I could have had a more steady hand. I took 6 pictures and most were not quite in focus. When you zoom you really need a steady hand

Blizz - I hear you. Now where we are there might be some accumulating snow. 3/15/07 we got 10" and I believe in April 04 or 05 we got close to 6".
I am done with snow for the season. I want to start getting into Spring and the Easter flowers. Also, to get my gardens ready. As long as they are wet they can't be turned or tilled properly. Will you be able to garden this year? Did your blueberries ever make it?
Member Since: January 26, 2007 Posts: 72 Comments: 6233
177. originalLT
8:11 PM GMT on March 07, 2014
RE your post #174 Blizz, I remember 2 of them, of course "Super Storm" in 1993, and a 9 or 10" snow in early April, I think it was in 1982 or 1983.
Member Since: January 31, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 7064
176. listenerVT
7:23 PM GMT on March 07, 2014
Beautiful birds, TRP!


Wow, Walshy, that looks icy….and how my area has looked for months.



Today it is 39F here and looks like this:

Member Since: July 11, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 5401
175. Walshy
5:28 PM GMT on March 07, 2014
Power is back on for me at least! Ended up with 5" of snow. Up to 8.5" nearby. Some glazing of freezing rain and sleet.

Member Since: May 17, 2009 Posts: 2 Comments: 904
174. Zachary Labe
2:20 PM GMT on March 07, 2014
While there are signs of potential storminess on the horizon, we are getting in the time of year where large snowstorms are more and more unlikely from I-95 east to the coast. For instance, NYC has only had six 6"+ snowstorms since 1950 after March 10. Climatology is beginning to turn unfavorable and that is something to keep in mind despite whatever ridiculous model runs are churning out.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 278 Comments: 15045
173. Zachary Labe
1:05 PM GMT on March 07, 2014
TheRasberryPatch- Wow, great picture!
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 278 Comments: 15045
172. Walshy
6:47 AM GMT on March 07, 2014
Storm Prediction Center mesoscale discussion and special weather statements from the NWS are busting.

No freezing rain changed over to thunder snow. I guess the ice could still come after the intense banding.

Member Since: May 17, 2009 Posts: 2 Comments: 904
171. listenerVT
5:18 AM GMT on March 07, 2014
Quoting 164. PhillySnow:
Great to hear, Listener. Congratulations!


Thanks, Philly! Now I just need a snowstorm. LOL!



Member Since: July 11, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 5401
170. Walshy
4:09 AM GMT on March 07, 2014
Quoting TheRasberryPatch:


How much are you expecting?


Picked up a quick 2" of snow. Now stinging sleet/ZR. Already iced over the snow-pack.

I guess I am expecting 1" of sleet next and 0.1" freezing rain.

I am in the 50-60% chance range for over 0.25 of freezing rain tho. Wish-casting for more sleet! Not sure if it switches back over to heavy snow in the morning or not. Multiple ptype changes every 30mins... thought it was going to be more snowy...
Member Since: May 17, 2009 Posts: 2 Comments: 904
169. TheRasberryPatch
2:04 AM GMT on March 07, 2014
I took this picture late this afternoon. It is Cedar Wax Wings hanging out in one of my trees. About 15 of them

Member Since: January 26, 2007 Posts: 72 Comments: 6233
168. TheRasberryPatch
1:56 AM GMT on March 07, 2014
Quoting 167. Walshy:
Get PASTE BOMBED in the northern foothills of North Carolina.

Near North Wilkesboro to be exact. Heavy snow. Sleet mixed in briefly but back to all snow. When the event started winds were gusting over 20mph...quickest March accumulation in years. Perfect timing.


How much are you expecting?
Member Since: January 26, 2007 Posts: 72 Comments: 6233
167. Walshy
1:37 AM GMT on March 07, 2014
Getting PASTE BOMBED in the northern foothills of North Carolina.

Near North Wilkesboro to be exact. Heavy snow. Sleet mixed in briefly but back to all snow. When the event started winds were gusting over 20mph...quickest March accumulation in years. Perfect timing.
Member Since: May 17, 2009 Posts: 2 Comments: 904
166. Zachary Labe
9:37 PM GMT on March 06, 2014
Quoting 161. originalLT:
Blizz, is that any sort of record for that area?

Unfortunately, not even close. Ithaca sits in a very unusual geographical setup, which is perfect for katabatic winds and radiational cooling. It is typically one of the coldest locations in New York State. Add in the wind factor that I frequently mention and you have yourself a pretty miserable cold climate lol.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 278 Comments: 15045
165. zotty
4:20 PM GMT on March 06, 2014
Quoting 155. Blizzard92:

The larger finger lakes of Cayuga and Seneca do not. According to ice records, Lake Cayuga has only completely frozen over once in recorded history (1912). Ithaca is at the bottom of the lake and the current lake ice extends up about 1/4-1/2mi from the shallow waters of the inlet into the deeper portion of the lake. But that is it. The current extent of the ice is the largest I have seen. There is actually a tradition at Wells College that if the lake ever freezes over, they will cancel classes for one day.


1912? Only time? And you think this winter is cold, ha!
I like the finger lakes- very cool features. Thanks for the info...
Member Since: August 19, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 717
164. PhillySnow
11:49 AM GMT on March 06, 2014
Quoting 162. listenerVT:
There's nothing like sitting in the retina specialist's chair, with an incredibly dilated eye as he peers into your eye with an intense light, to remind you that you're mortal. Ash Wednesday observance: check!

The good news is that all is well, and I am free to jostle again. :-) That means I can shovel snow and go sledding again! Bring it on!!
Great to hear, Listener. Congratulations!
Member Since: December 18, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 1210
163. listenerVT
6:31 AM GMT on March 06, 2014
Well, I thought the subzeros were behind us for this season, but I was wrong.
Currently -8F and it's possible we'll get down to -11F.
Member Since: July 11, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 5401
162. listenerVT
2:55 AM GMT on March 06, 2014
There's nothing like sitting in the retina specialist's chair, with an incredibly dilated eye as he peers into your eye with an intense light, to remind you that you're mortal. Ash Wednesday observance: check!

The good news is that all is well, and I am free to jostle again. :-) That means I can shovel snow and go sledding again! Bring it on!!
Member Since: July 11, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 5401
161. originalLT
9:44 PM GMT on March 05, 2014
Blizz, is that any sort of record for that area?
Member Since: January 31, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 7064
160. TheRasberryPatch
8:52 PM GMT on March 05, 2014
Quoting 159. Blizzard92:
This morning marks 21 days below zero up here since December 1 for lows. Tonight should be another dropping to around -10F.


Sounds like you are in your element, huh. hhahahahahahaa

A very cold past few seasons. I remember back in August we had highs in the mid 70's a lot during that month, which is highly unusual
Member Since: January 26, 2007 Posts: 72 Comments: 6233
159. Zachary Labe
8:43 PM GMT on March 05, 2014
This morning marks 21 days below zero up here since December 1 for lows. Tonight should be another dropping to around -10F.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 278 Comments: 15045
158. TheRasberryPatch
1:52 PM GMT on March 05, 2014
Temperature got to the teens last night. Warming up now. In the mid 20's on the way to 30's. It is so nice hearing the birds singing their mating song. I always love it, especially after a cold and snow covered Winter
Member Since: January 26, 2007 Posts: 72 Comments: 6233
157. listenerVT
4:56 AM GMT on March 05, 2014
Well, we were expecting -10F last night and got -15F.

I thought that would be the last of the minus temps this year, but now they say -8F for tomorrow night.

But I can't really complain. We have about 3-4" of ice with at least 3" of snow on top. But! This was the scene at my house on 7 March 2011:




(There's a red pickup truck in that photo.)


See?

Member Since: July 11, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 5401
156. Astrometeor
12:24 AM GMT on March 05, 2014
New blog with pictures from the storm.

All of the pictures were taken by my mother with her Pentax camera.
Member Since: July 2, 2012 Posts: 79 Comments: 8243
155. Zachary Labe
11:30 PM GMT on March 04, 2014
Quoting 152. zotty:


Hey Blizz- I hope last night was one of the nights the heat was on :)

Here's a stupid question- do the finger lakes freeze? Some are so deep I was wondering if they are like Ontario...

The larger finger lakes of Cayuga and Seneca do not. According to ice records, Lake Cayuga has only completely frozen over once in recorded history (1912). Ithaca is at the bottom of the lake and the current lake ice extends up about 1/4-1/2mi from the shallow waters of the inlet into the deeper portion of the lake. But that is it. The current extent of the ice is the largest I have seen. There is actually a tradition at Wells College that if the lake ever freezes over, they will cancel classes for one day.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 278 Comments: 15045
154. originalLT
10:38 PM GMT on March 04, 2014
Wow, that's cold Blizz, glad my days of going to those 8 O'clock classes are over!
Member Since: January 31, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 7064

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About Blizzard92

Cornell University- Atmospheric Sciences Student; Central PA SKYWARN Storm Spotter; American Meteorological Society Member; PA CoCoRaHS Branch Member

Local Weather

Scattered Clouds
53 °F
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Personal Weather Stations

Linglestown, PA
Elevation: 520 ft
Temperature: 24.2 °F
Dew Point: 15.2 °F
Humidity: 68%
Wind: Calm
Wind Gust: 9.0 mph
Updated: 10:37 AM EST on January 18, 2014

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