A Novice Photographer's Journey II...

By: Zachary Labe , 3:15 AM GMT on January 17, 2010

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Unfortunately, to some extent, the 21st century has the reputation of engaging in a myriad of activities. Ongoing across the world, millions of people are on a tight schedule, to go to work, go to the gym, gather groceries, go to school, go to this and that, etc. This scheduled lifestyle was even noted as I was learning how to drive, and I used the right, left, right motion at a stop sign. Yet on occasion a distant honking of a horn behind me would signal that people do not follow the rules and just do not feel like stopping at a stop sign (sound contradictory?); all that matters is they arrive at their next destination. Whether or not the scheduled lifestyle is for the better, most have obviously lost their appreciation for their surroundings. Fortunately I have been able to experience many different cultures around the world, and subcultures here in the United States from Rome, Italy to Paris, France, to Cancun. Mexico, to Halifax, Nova Scotia, to Athens, Greece, to Jackson Hole, Wyoming, to Chicago, Illinois, to Bar Harbor, Maine, and many more. The world is built on these subcontinent entities to create a unique planet. Amongst my unique hobbies, photography is definitely up on top. While I marvel at the brilliant photography as shown in the Wunderground photo gallery, it provides inspiration for how one looks onto the world. Perhaps you may be remember, I did a special photography blog back in July 2008... Link featuring a seasonal perspective approach across the horizon of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. This narrative will take a different approach using some of my favorite pictures through my travels using a Sony Cybershot DSC-H20.


(Mt. Washington, New Hampshire)

Perhaps one of my favorite poets Robert Frost regards society ideally in his poem...

"Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening"
Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village, though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer 5
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake. 10
The only other sounds the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark, and deep,
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep, 15
And miles to go before I sleep.


The ambiguity of the verses can be translated in several meanings, but critics generally acclaim it to be a man decisively stopping in the woods to marvel at the simple yet perplexity of a snowy evening in nature. While he has obligations of his scheduled routine lifestyle, he wonders whether to face society's calling. Like Frost's "The Road Not Taken" we clearly see the suddel nature of the destructive forces of technological enhancement and advancement. The man in the snowy woods has clearly reached the mountainous division between nature vs. society.


(Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming)

I took an interesting trip back a few years ago aboard a Conestoga Bus Trip for two weeks across the central and Western United States traveling from Pennsylvania to Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, South Dakota, Wyoming, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Kentucky, and West Virginia. While my classmates associated this as a senior citizen bus trip, there were a lot interesting people aboard that I associated with over the two week period full of interesting stories from past lives and experiences or when life was just "more simpler." While facing many ongoing hurdles in life, they seemed to simply appreciate life more than most people.


(Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming)

I have always enjoyed traveling, and fortunately I have been able to explore many places and sights most people never are able to even see. For instance, upon one of our frequent bathroom/rest stops across the west, a woman at the information desk asked where we were all from? Quickly responding, we said the Harrisburg region in Pennsylvania, and she followed back with, "Do you live with the Amish?" Without visiting subcultures of each state in the United States, reputations are quick to splurge around it seems. Although I must say, Kansas has the best beef/steak, Wyoming does seem to have the most ranchers/cowboys, and New York City is the city that never sleeps.


(Pike's Peak, Colorado)

The western United States, candid away from California up through Washington, does seem to have a slower lifestyle persona. The buffalo continue to roam across the vast prairies and over the rolling Black Hills of South Dakota. Towns remain segregated with road signs lining the highways "next rest stop; 71mi." And people in general just seem overall, friendlier.


(Acropolis east of Delphi, Greece)

More recently I had the wonderful opportunity to visit Greece and Italy on a Sophomore/Junior Latin III class club trip. While I was marveling at the peaks of Alps in Italy, my classmates were sound asleep dreaming. While it seems the current youth population and/or all generation's youth seem more akin to shopping or sports rather than appreciating their natural surroundings and history that carved the way we live to today.


(Alps, northern Italy)

I have walked the streets of Pompeii, marveled at the Acropolis in Athens, pondered at Michelangelo's paintings in the Sistine Chapel, gazed upon the great pyramids of the Mayan city of Chichen Itza,yet I still cannot fathom ably come upon a theory to how much knowledge of history can be gained from simple observation and experience.


(Ancient Roman Forum; Rome, Italy)

Despite the popular persona of history being "about old people," the foundation of every culture and society has been built upon the successes and failures of those before us. If we can examine their mistakes, we can make for a better life for those of tomorrow.


(20km north of Rome, Italy)

Wherever the winds steer your ship or travels take you, now so more than ever before is the importance to appreciate not only the intricate style of nature, but the importance of history is equally prudent. As Aldous Huxley's "A Brave New World" and George Orwell's "1984" showed us, the abuse of technology and conformity vs. nature will be the downfall of modern society. Despite if one does not want to fly abroad or travel 4000mi+ on a motor coach, the intricate planet is right out in backyard from the caravan of ants carrying leaves to their dirt mound to the cardinal eating the last of the sunflower seeds before dusk. I have attached a collection of photos below that display not only of my favorite pictures, but also those of planet Earth. And to add for some weather theme, lol...

"Here northeast of Harrisburg 2009-2010 winter statistics"
(Snow Stats)
Current Snow Cover- 0.00in
Monthly Total- 2.1in
Seasonal Total- 18.1in
October Total- 0.0in
November Total- Trace
December Total- 16.0in
January Total- 2.1in
Winter Weather Advisories- 5
Winter Storm Warnings- 1
Ice Storm Warnings- 0
Blizzard Warnings- 0
Freezing Rain Advisories- 2
Winter Storm Watches- 1

(Temperature Stats)
Lowest High Temperature- 22.9F
Lowest Low Temperature- 13.7F
Wind Chill Advisories- 0
Wind Chill Warnings- 0

(Winter Storms Stats)
Dec 5 - 1.5in - First accumulating snow of season
Dec 8-9 - 2.5in - Snow changed to plain rain
Dec 13 - .1in - Freezing rain
Dec 19 - 9.0in - Heavy snow, higher amounts to south
Dec 31 - 3.0in - 2.5hr warm air advection event
Dec 31 #2 - .2in - Freezing rain/sleet later in day
Jan 8 - 1.5in - Light snow associated with clipper

A quick weather synopsis of the week ahead continues with a warmer than normal pattern with GFS MOS and MAV generally running 5-10F above normal for upcoming high temperatures. A double barrel low will cause a plethora of anomalous moisture from the Gulf of Mexico to cause the Miller A storm system to track near benchmark on Sunday. But with a lackadaisical high pressure system moving offshore, it will provide little cold air. So despite an ideal track, temperatures aloft and at the surface will inhibit wintry precipitation for the entire northern Middle Atlantic. Rainfall amounts will range from .25in near Erie, Pennsylvania to about 1.25in from southern Pennsylvania on southward. As UVV and PVA increases, dynamic cooling may result in marginal 0C H85 temperatures. This may allow for a transfer from rain to snow over the higher elevations, especially above 1800ft in Pennsylvania. 1-3in of snow is possible favoring Sullivan and Tioga Counties up through the Poconos and northeastern mountains. Freezing rain may also pose a few problems north of I-80 with trace amounts generally to the south. Evaporational cooling will also be eliminated generally from this system with dewpoints in the low to mid 30s and mid levels generally moist. As the system departs Monday night, a continued benign pattern with 5-10F above normal averages with partly cloudy skies will continue Monday through Tuesday. By Wednesday guidance indicates a weak wave of low pressure in the form over overrunning QPF towards Pennsylvania and northern Maryland. Precipitation types will be questionable, but with GFS/ECMWF/NAM thermals biased a bit too cool this week, I am leaning on the warm side. Also towards Friday and Saturday is another system of concern with again lacking cold air. The continued pattern ahead will be typical of that of a La Nina for the East, but El Nino for the west setting up for an active storm track over California and the Pacific Northwest. The active Pacific jet will continue to mitigate any arctic air masses to our north bottled up in Canada where H85s are near -40C towards the upper Hudson Bay. The long term pattern through the rest of the month looks to be a general continued theme of marginal cold with an active storm jet favoring above normal precipitation. Snow south of the Mason-Dixon Line or even I-80 for that matter will be hard to come by. Mixed signals arise towards the first of February, but unless we see the MJO resurface near phases 6, 7, or 8, the same-old, same-old pattern will continue.

December 5th Snowstorm... (Blizzard92)
Summit of Blue Mountain (elevation ~1300ft), just northeast of Harrisburg, PA. About 1.5-2inches of accumulated snowfall so far.
December 5th Snowstorm...
Winter in Pennsylvania... (Blizzard92)
Clark's Creek in central Dauphin County; snow depth 2in
Winter in Pennsylvania...
Black Moshannon State Park (Blizzard92)
Black Moshannon State Park is located northwest of State College situated on the 2000ft+ Alleghany Plateau. It features some unique geography including a National Bog Preserve home to unusual plants and animals. I took a trip there after my tour to the NWS and got a few interesting pictures. It is a must see Pennsylvania State Park.
Black Moshannon State Park
Fall in Pennsylvania... (Blizzard92)
Fall colors are at peak here in the southern portion of central Pennsylvania in the ridge and valley region. These pictures were taken on the northern side of Blue Mountain just north of Harrisburg. Colors are the most brilliant in years.
Fall in Pennsylvania...
Gardens 2009 Cont: (Blizzard92)
These pictures are the gardens of my close relative who was featured in the Hershey Horticulture Garden 2009 Tour. She also won several first place Blue Ribbons for the Hershey Garden Contest and received an Honorable Mention George Weigel Award for Koi Ponds. She is located up here in the Harrisburg vicinity.
Gardens 2009 Cont:
Water Garden (Blizzard92)
This is a new water garden I made this summer. I took an empty barrel and put lining in it. Then filled with a layer of stone followed by the fountain, water, and plants. My own little oasis.
Water Garden
Hershey Gardens and Butterfly house... (Blizzard92)
Hershey Gardens and Butterfly house...
January Deep Freeze... (Blizzard92)
After some of the coldest weather in years, the Susquehanna River at Rockville just north of Harrisburg is nearly frozen over.
January Deep Freeze...
Falls leaves are changing... (Blizzard92)
Falls leaves are changing...
Florida sunset... (Blizzard92)
After the storm was a gorgeous sunset on the lake...
Florida sunset...
Hyner View State Park (Blizzard92)
Hyner View State Park
Swatara Creek State Park (Blizzard92)
Swatara Creek State Park
Snowy northwest mountains outside of Williamsport, Pennsylvania (Blizzard92)
Snowy northwest mountains outside of Williamsport, Pennsylvania
Beautiful yet destructive ice (Blizzard92)
Alot of damage from .5inch of frz rain
Beautiful yet destructive ice
Hershey Gardens and Butterfly house... (Blizzard92)
Hershey Gardens and Butterfly house...
A sunny afternoon on the beach... (Blizzard92)
A sunny afternoon on the beach...
Fresh Snow (Blizzard92)
Fresh Snow
A fall colored valley... (Blizzard92)
A fall colored valley...
Boyd Big Tree Preserve Conservation Area (Blizzard92)
Boyd Big Tree Preserve Conservation Area
Snow geese heading north... (Blizzard92)
This is located in southeastern, PA on the Lancaster, Lebanon County line called the Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area. Thousands of snowgeese migrate to this marsh/lake area each year on their journey north into Canada.
Snow geese heading north...

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261. weflytoo
10:13 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
Just found the blog. Love it! Thanks for the work you put into it.
260. TheRasberryPatch
8:23 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
Blizz - how can you put out a new blog when the championship games are on television? hahaha
Member Since: January 26, 2007 Posts: 72 Comments: 6244
259. flattyboy50
8:21 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
Thank you, Blizz!
Member Since: December 19, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 155
258. Zachary Labe
8:14 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
flattyboy50- GFS prognostic verification indicates a bias to over intensify these anticyclones in the 96-150hr time frame, so in general I think it will weaken a bit when it actually verifies allowing the precipitation to verify a bit farther north. But the exact position is critical to if the system is surpressed over the southern Middle Atlantic and southeast. Remember in general the first wave is a west to east momentum system. My new blog will be out by 4pm, which should make this all a bit more clear.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 281 Comments: 15071
257. flattyboy50
8:07 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
Hi Blizz, How much of a player do you believe this big high pressure is going to influence the events of this next week`s weather? Do you believe its track will progress SE, or remain somewhere between Hudson Bay & the Great lakes? It is approching 1044mb and may continue to build a little more. Hopefully, it will not devide itself, or get streched out north-south too much.
Member Since: December 19, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 155
256. originalLT
7:57 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
Thanks Blizz!
Member Since: January 31, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 7359
255. Zachary Labe
7:55 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
Quoting originalLT:
Here in Stamford CT. it is Cloudy , 38.5F, Baro. 1019mb and falling, very light ENE wind, with some very light rain just starting, not showing on radar.

Inversion is allowing for low stratus (ceilings about 300-500') to cause drizzle in which the high radar beams are not able to detect. The drizzle should only amount to a trace to .05in of rain before the stratiform precipitation sheild moves into the region.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 281 Comments: 15071
254. originalLT
7:48 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
Here in Stamford CT. it is Cloudy , 38.5F, Baro. 1019mb and falling, very light ENE wind, with some very light rain just starting, not showing on radar.
Member Since: January 31, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 7359
253. Zachary Labe
7:20 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
Quoting flattyboy50:
S Delaware obs...temp 59F wind SSE 12-19MPH barometer 29.95 falling overcast: altostratus,stratus deck. no rain so far.

This goes to show the thermal gradient between areas within 50mi of the coast vs. farther inland. Cold air damming is holding current boundary layer temperatures here in KMDT around 35-37F, while easterly winds are allowing for temperatures near 60F near the coastline in Delaware.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 281 Comments: 15071
252. flattyboy50
7:17 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
S Delaware obs...temp 59F wind SSE 12-19MPH barometer 29.95 falling overcast: altostratus,stratus deck. no rain so far.
Member Since: December 19, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 155
251. TheRasberryPatch
7:13 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
flattyboy - the small bits of data comes from being a scientist. in school you are always taught the more data the better and that you can't really make a good hypothesis without a good spread of data.

it rained here early - mostly a heavy mist. it didn't show up as measureable
Member Since: January 26, 2007 Posts: 72 Comments: 6244
250. Zachary Labe
6:17 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
Rain has commenced here, .02in so far.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 281 Comments: 15071
249. flattyboy50
6:08 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
Hi there Rasberry patch! Just to let you know I agree with you, on the "small data "remark. Although the subject of weather is still not the exact science we want it to be, we have more knowledge and tools at hand now than ever. I have follwed, recorded,watched,and eat & slept weather for 55 years now. Its all one pearson opinion vs another. It was HCN Hazel that got me going. The immense Blizzard of Feb 1958, and the snowstorm of Jan 1966, have yet to be surpassed in the Mid-Atlantic, in my opinion, although they have been approched on occasions. Live long enough, and you can see them eclipsed. I think if you lived in the "east" only the Superstorm of Mar `93 the winter of `93-`94, the Jan `96 storm, winter of `02-`03, and to a lesser degree the `04-`05 season there has been not to much to cheer about snow wise. Now live further north, or west, alot different. As far as the winters of the 1940`s in the east, a real banger in 1940, 1942 was very good too, but then you had to wait until Dec 1945, then wait until the winter of `47-`48. If you lived in the west, the winter of 1949-1950, that winter was extreme for them. They werent even aware of the jet stream until WWII.
Member Since: December 19, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 155
248. originalLT
5:28 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
I hear you Blizz, but I was reffering to flattyboy50 question of 31.00" high pressyre systems(that's a 1050mb high pressure system).On Suilli's blog and on the good Doctors blog, they have mentioned several times about the diminution of ice cover over the years in the arctic. I feel there maybe some correlation of this to flattyboy50 comments, IF infact this is the case. I really don't know if this is the case or not. I guess its checkable.
Member Since: January 31, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 7359
247. TheRasberryPatch
5:05 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
well said Blizz. it seems like people want to mention climate change on such a small data comparison. i always tell people let me know after 100 years or so and they we can discuss what is going on with the climate. 10 years, 20 years or even 30 years is not nearly enough data. could you imagine what people would be saying back around 1940 with all those summers of drought conditions or the unbelievable cold conditions during WWII. the 90's were very snowy.

flattyboy - so Smitty's is getting their act together? last summer was one of the worse i had with their food and i noticed they weren't nearly as crowded either. makes you wonder if they got too big. btw - that tenderloin sandwich is good, though
Member Since: January 26, 2007 Posts: 72 Comments: 6244
246. Zachary Labe
4:56 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
originalLT- 1020+mb highs have just been in unfavorable locations in recent winters sliding to the east near Newfoundland, but they still are there. Cold air has also certainly been across the northern Hemisphere, but the recent Nina pattern has just made it difficult for the polar air to slide south of the Canadian border. In fact some of the coldest and snowiest winters have occured in the 90s, which it seems many people forget. You would think it has been years and years since we have had polar cold and abnormally snowy winters, but they are only back in the 90s and 02-03. Once again courtesy of selective memory for some people, one poor winter means that the last 5 winters have been poor which isn't true; people do not have a very good long term climatology memory. In fact NYC saw one of its snowiest decades from 2000-2010. Anyone enough of that, I am not a fan of mentioning climate change.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 281 Comments: 15071
245. flattyboy50
4:52 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
Here in S. Delaware...Temp 55F overcast, stratus deck. South wind 6-14 MPH
Member Since: December 19, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 155
244. flattyboy50
4:47 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
I am of the opinion that this is due to the decrease of ice coverage, world wide. I am also not one to jump on the "global warming" band wagon, either. But I agree that while cyclone intensity has been largely the same or even increased, high pressures of 31.00" used to be an occurrence of every few years. Now the are conspicuous in their absence.
Member Since: December 19, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 155
243. originalLT
4:38 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
Maybe "Global Warming" is the culprit? We just don't get those super dense/cold high pressure systems like we used to when it was generally colder with more ice coverage in the arctic. Could be?
Member Since: January 31, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 7359
242. Zachary Labe
4:32 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
flattyboy50- I have not heard of that correlation before, but I have heard that in general there has been an increase in low pressure systems; take for instance Arizona just recently broke their state record for the lowest STP of all time. Most people who have been reading here for a good deal of time know I am against the theme of 'global warming' so I am not going to relate it to that. Recently cyclongenesis has been on the increase in the recent decade or two likely courtesy of increasing thermal boundaries which is part due to the variable Pacific recently with strong El Ninos and strong La Ninas. There are so many variables that come in to play that while there could be correlations, some factors are just coincidences.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 281 Comments: 15071
241. flattyboy50
4:28 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
Wings are better than ever, had some last week. `bout time to hit `em again.
Member Since: December 19, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 155
240. flattyboy50
4:25 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
I agree, freezing rain events I can count on one hand, coast-wise. I do want to pose a question to you, as you are very weather-wise for you age, and perhaps give me another point of view, on this: Why have there been a notable decline on anti-cyclones with barometric pressures 31.00"(or higher) within the lower 48 states??? The lack of such has been notable since the 1980`s.
Member Since: December 19, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 155
239. TheRasberryPatch
4:21 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
sorry to say flattyboy, but that is pretty typical for the coast. that one storm back in December i think was highly unusual for all of us to be getting snow from the coast to the mountains. Usually if you are getting snow then we people inland aren't getting anything.

btw - how are the wings at Smitty's?
Member Since: January 26, 2007 Posts: 72 Comments: 6244
238. Zachary Labe
4:15 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
flattyboy50- Well a surpressed threat is definitely possible as evident by the GFS, but you are either to get snow or rain. Ice storms are very rare to the coastal region.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 281 Comments: 15071
237. flattyboy50
4:09 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
13 miles from the DE coast here. But unless the low passes far enough to the south, a change over, or mix usually occurs. With a low trending further north, may have mostly a mix or...rain.
Member Since: December 19, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 155
236. Zachary Labe
4:09 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
Winterstormsblog- Thanks!
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 281 Comments: 15071
235. Winterstormsblog
4:06 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
Blizzard,

An awesome blog post, with incredible pictures! bravo.
Member Since: October 5, 2007 Posts: 86 Comments: 5650
234. Winterstormsblog
4:05 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
Blizzard,

An awesome blog post, with incredible pictures! bravo.
Member Since: October 5, 2007 Posts: 86 Comments: 5650
233. Winterstormsblog
4:05 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
Blizzard,

An awesome blog post, with incredible pictures! bravo.
Member Since: October 5, 2007 Posts: 86 Comments: 5650
232. Zachary Labe
3:58 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
Quoting flattyboy50:
With just marginal amount of cold in many areas, I hope its not an ice storm we are looking at...

Recent model guidance suggests actually it will be quite cold for many areas, at least inland, but that is typical. H85s over central Pennsylvania are -10C with the 0C line across Richmond to southern Delaware, which is pretty typical of that in these situations. Of course these lines will waffle, and this storm will likely trend a bit to the north, most areas should not have to worry about mixing unless within 50mi of the coastline, although this bides that model guidance stays consistent which it likely will not.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 281 Comments: 15071
231. flattyboy50
3:53 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
With just marginal amount of cold in many areas, I hope its not an ice storm we are looking at...
Member Since: December 19, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 155
230. Zachary Labe
3:49 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
SilverShipsofAndilar- It starts an isentropic lift/warm air advection event transitioning to a coastal low, which usually produce pretty well in some areas. The biggest threat against a winter storm is the PV nudging this to our south and east. But for the now the current GFS, GGEM, and ECMWF models runs show a moderate snow storm at least.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 281 Comments: 15071
229. SilverShipsofAndilar
3:47 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
Quoting Blizzard92:
Alrighty well the H5 wavelength pattern and position of the PV may favor a long duration winter storm towards the end of the week. I will acknowledge more of the setup in my new blog. After the two recent unfavorable storms, where I kept quiet; I am sounding the first alarm for this event with the time frame late Thursday through Saturday evening.


Please, oh please, oh please!
Member Since: December 1, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 600
228. Zachary Labe
3:37 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
Alrighty well the H5 wavelength pattern and position of the PV may favor a long duration winter storm towards the end of the week. I will acknowledge more of the setup in my new blog. After the two recent unfavorable storms, where I kept quiet; I am sounding the first alarm for this event with the time frame late Thursday through Saturday evening.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 281 Comments: 15071
227. Zachary Labe
3:33 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
synthman19872003- Thanks!

Stormfront- Thanks! Glad to see you here, thanks for stopping by!
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 281 Comments: 15071
226. Stormfront
2:04 PM GMT on January 24, 2010
Best of luck on your interview Blizzard. Hopefully it will help to open some doors for you. I'll be rooting for you!
Member Since: March 3, 2006 Posts: 1 Comments: 125
224. synthman19872003
3:12 AM GMT on January 24, 2010
Congrats on the interview Blizz!

Still looking like a washout for the East Coast states tomorrow! NWS says our area could get over 2 inches!
Member Since: May 18, 2006 Posts: 52 Comments: 4045
222. originalLT
11:20 PM GMT on January 23, 2010
Blizz, looking at the nation-wide radar now, as of 6:18pm, it does not look that impressive. I guess you expect it to fill in and expand as the front moves eastward during the overnight and Sunday. Looking foreward to your new blog.
Member Since: January 31, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 7359
221. TheRasberryPatch
11:18 PM GMT on January 23, 2010
sounds like a pretty good storm. coming up the coast?
Member Since: January 26, 2007 Posts: 72 Comments: 6244
220. Zachary Labe
9:24 PM GMT on January 23, 2010
Thanks for the advice everyone!

Flood watch has been posted. Hydrology concerns are very high for this storm system with PWATs several deviations above normal reaching near 1.2in precipitative waters. I think a widespread 1-4in of rain is likely causing moderate flooding especially towards northeastern Pennsylvania up through eastern New York State. I will try to get my new blog out early tomorrow to detail the event.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 281 Comments: 15071
219. bwi
7:09 PM GMT on January 23, 2010
Congrats Blizz -- that interview sounds like fun. (And good advice I think from originalLT to make sure the interviewer has a clear understanding -- keep it simple!)

On the subject of community news features, here's an oddly relevant tidbit: There was a writeup this morning in our local (very local!) community newspaper about Eugenia Kalnay, who won this year's World Meteorology Organization annual prize. Turns out she's a neighbor, and teaches at the University of Maryland nearby!

The link is just to the whole paper in PDF format, so you have to scroll down through the want ads and police report and gardening club news to finish the article. But I thought it was sort of cool to learn we had such an accomplished weather scientist down the street...
Member Since: September 4, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 1381
218. originalLT
5:59 PM GMT on January 23, 2010
That interview sounds cool Blizz, just try to make sure they get whatever you tell them straight, sometimes these reporters or interviewers get things mixed -up or wrong. Try to be very clear in what you say. That's the best advice I can give you.
Member Since: January 31, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 7359
217. pittsburghnurse
5:28 PM GMT on January 23, 2010
Sorry to rain on your winter parade but I'm tickled, snoopy dancing happy, that what we have here is a taste of Spring in da Burgh. Motorcycles are humming, birds are singing, the Pens are going to come out of their slump and the Pirates are gonna win the penant.
Member Since: October 14, 2006 Posts: 1 Comments: 639
216. Zachary Labe
3:06 PM GMT on January 23, 2010
Thanks all!!! I am very enthusiastic about the opportunity.

Monday should feature some very warm temperatures as the 70-80knot low level jet should tick highs near 60 for many areas up through the I-95 corridor into NYC also. Typically models underestimate high temperatures in these situations so I would tick about 2-4F above NWS forecasts.
Member Since: December 14, 2007 Posts: 281 Comments: 15071
215. cchamp6
2:59 PM GMT on January 23, 2010
12.9 for a low temp here in northwest Connecticut this morning.

Local tv weather personalities in Ct. use some of the Wunderground temps. They like to use mine when we have the great radiational cooling nights.
Member Since: December 21, 2006 Posts: 5 Comments: 1639
213. TheRasberryPatch
2:45 PM GMT on January 23, 2010
CONGRATULATIONS BLIZZ. that is great news. if the local mets were smart they would be using this blog to help in their forecasting. I don't get why the locals don't use info from our weather stations or from the CWOP.

Btw - the weather has turned recently because i read about how to measure snow. you can all thank me later.

low this morning 21F
Member Since: January 26, 2007 Posts: 72 Comments: 6244
212. weathergeek5
2:44 PM GMT on January 23, 2010
wow that is cool!!! Looking forward to the updates!!
Member Since: December 25, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 1744
211. TrentonThunder
2:39 PM GMT on January 23, 2010
Wow that's awsome! Keep us updated. Good luck...

There really were some huge differences in overnight lows even on a local scale. Lows ranged from upper 10's to upper 20's in some really short distances. Goes to show what radiational cooling in still air can do in combination with local topography and local surrounding environment. It reminds me of when you jump into a pool that has been sitting still and calm and you can feel huge differences in warm and cold pockets.
Member Since: December 17, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 796

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About Blizzard92

Cornell University- Atmospheric Sciences Undergrad; Research Assist.- Onset of Spring Indices Toolbox; Interests- Small spatial scale climatolology

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Linglestown, PA
Elevation: 520 ft
Temperature: 24.2 °F
Dew Point: 15.2 °F
Humidity: 68%
Wind: Calm
Wind Gust: 9.0 mph
Updated: 10:37 AM EST on January 18, 2014

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